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FATHER: James Madison


James Madison (March 16, 1751 - June 28, 1836) was an American politician and political philosopher who served as the fourth President of the United States (1809-1817), and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Considered to be the "Father of the Constitution", he was[MORE]

FATHER: George Mason


George Mason IV (December 11, 1725 October 7, 1792) was an American Patriot, statesman and a delegate from Virginia to the U.S. Constitutional Convention. Along with James Madison, he is called the "Father of the United States Bill of Rights." For these reasons he is considered[MORE]

ARTICLE: The Separation of Church and State


Our founding fathers had strong beliefs in the separation of church and state. All previous societies that were built upon religious beliefs eventually failed. [MORE]

ARTICLE: The Failure of the Founders of The US Constitution


Several years ago I began to feel overwhelmed by all the reports coming from Washington, especially the multitude of deficit spending and I decided to get involved. I began asking myself if the Founders may have overlooked something in the U.S. Constitution which could have preve[MORE]

ARTICLE: I Am America


This text is written from the point of view, that if the land of America could talk, what it may say to the people, telling them of the freedom that can be had in America. Quotes from some of the greatest men that this nation has ever known. The great diversity that is this great[MORE]

ARTICLE: The History of Government and the Right to Keep and Bear Arms


Let's take a look at several thousand years of governmental disarmament of the populace. Of course all the while, the rulers, their guards and armies remained armed.[MORE]

ARTICLE: The Bill of Rights


"On February 6, 1788, Massachusetts, by a narrow margin of 19 votes in a convention with a membership of 335, endorsed the new Constitution, but recommended that a bill of rights be added to protect the States from Federal encroachment on individual liberties. . . . New York ra[MORE]

ARTICLE: George Washington - The Best President?


George Washington is a much-admired person in many respects. As the first president of the United States, he set the course upon which the current three-branch system of federal government is based. George Washington is perhaps the one person who can most claim the title of Found[MORE]

ARTICLE: The First Leftist


Our founding fathers, along with the first Leftists who were of the same political faith, were well aware that individual freedom and personal responsibility for one's own welfare are equal and inseparable parts of the same truth. They knew that history amply supports this tru[MORE]

ARTICLE: Liberalism Stands for Freedom


THE story about the Grand Inquisitor in Dostoevsky's novel, The Brothers Karamazov, pictures Christ as appearing in the streets of Seville during the Spanish Inquisition just as a large number of heretics had been burned at the stake. The Grand Inquisitor arrested Christ, visited[MORE]

FILE: The Bill of Rights


The Bill of Rights is the collective name for the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution. Proposed to assuage the fears of Anti-Federalists who had opposed Constitutional ratification, these amendments guarantee a number of personal freedo[MORE]

VIDEO: James Madison - Mini Biography


Watch a short biography video on James Madison, the fourth President of the United States and the "Father of the Constitution." Learn more about James Madison: bit.ly/165qPcy Watch more videos about James Madison: bit.ly/1bnmAtS Watch the U.S. Presidents play list: www.youtube[MORE]

VIDEO: A Stafford History Minute: George Mason


George Mason IV (December 11, 1725 -- October 7, 1792) was an American Patriot, statesman and a delegate from Virginia to the U.S. Constitutional Convention. Along with James Madison, he is called the "Father of the United States Bill of Rights." For these reasons he is considere[MORE]

Quote 212 details Share on Google+ - Quote 212 Linked In Share Button - Quote 212 The truth is, after all the declamations we have heard, that the Constitution is itself, in every rational sense, and to every useful purpose, A BILL OF RIGHTS.


Quote 900 details Share on Google+ - Quote 900 Linked In Share Button - Quote 900 On examining the new proposed constitution, there can be no question but that there is authority enough lodged in the proposed Federal Congress, if abused, to do the greatest injury. And it is perfectly idle to object to it, that there is no bill of rights, or to propose to add to it a provision that a trial by jury shall in no case be omitted, or to patch it up by adding a stipulation in favor of the press, or to guard it by removing the paltry objection to the right of Congress to regulate the time and manner of elections.

Roger Sherman: November 22, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 1212 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1212 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1212 Of a very different nature, tho' only one degree better than the other reasoning, is all that sublimity of nonsense and alarm, that has been thundered against it in every shape of metaphoric terror, on the subject of a bill of rights, the liberty of the press, rights of conscience, rights of taxation and election, trials in the vicinity, freedom of speech, trial by jury, and a standing army. These last are undoubtedly important points, much too important to depend on mere paper protection. For, guard such privileges by the strongest expressions, still if you leave the legislative and executive power in the hands of those who are or may be disposed to deprive you of them you are but slaves.

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Nov 22, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 1258 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1258 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1258 A bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on Earth.


Quote 1259 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1259 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1259 There are certain maxims by which every wise and enlightened people will regulate their conduct. There are certain political maxims, which no free people out ever to abandon. Maxims of which the observance is essential to the security of happiness. It is impiously irritating the avenging hand of Heaven, when a people who are in the full enjoyment of freedom, launch out into the wide ocean of human affairs, and desert those maxims which alone can preserve liberty. Such maxims, humble as they are, are those only which can render a nation safe or formidable... We have one, Sir, That all men are by nature free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into society, they cannot by an compact deprive or divest their prosperity. We have a set of maxims of the same spirit, which must be beloved by every friend of liberty, to virtue, to mankind. Our Bill of Rights contains those admirable maxims.


Quote 1261 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1261 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1261 In proportion as Government is influenced by opinion, must it be so by whatever influences opinion. This decides the question concerning the bill of rights, which acquires efficacy as time sanctifies and incorporates it with the public sentiment


Quote 1334 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1334 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1334 It has been objected also against a bill of rights, that, by enumerating particular exceptions to the grant of power, it would disparage those rights which were not placed in that enumeration, and it might follow by implication, that those rights which were not singled out, were intended to be assigned into the hands of the general government, and were consequently insecure. This is one of the most plausible arguments I have ever heard urged against the admission of a bill of rights into this system; but, I conceive, that may be guarded against. I have attempted it, as gentlemen may see by turning to the last clause of the 4th resolution.

James Madison: Proposing Bill of Rights to House, June 8, 1789
Web Source: https://founderswisdom.wordpress.com/2016/03/01/4926/

Quote 1368 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1368 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1368 That all power is vested in, and consequently derived from, the people; that magistrates are their trustees and servants, and at all times amendable to them.




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