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ARTICLE: The Failure of the Founders of The US Constitution


Several years ago I began to feel overwhelmed by all the reports coming from Washington, especially the multitude of deficit spending and I decided to get involved. I began asking myself if the Founders may have overlooked something in the U.S. Constitution which could have preve[MORE]

ARTICLE: American Morality - A Glimmer of Hope on the Horizon


Has the United States lost it's basic principle of morality? Has the United States moved away from the guiding principles that this country was founded on?[MORE]

ARTICLE: Interview with Benjamin Franklin


It was my honor to sit down with Benjamin Franklin to discuss his views on some of the common topics of the day as well as his view of what the "American Dream" is. The following post contains that interview and some interesting facts about Benjamin Franklin.[MORE]

BOOK: For God and Country (T.K. Marion)


The United States of America was founded on faith, courage and sacrifice. Profound evidence of this was best displayed by General George Washington and his Continental Army during the American Revolution. In fact, more precisely, at Valley Forge during the winter 1777-8. The hist[MORE]

Quote 118 details Share on Google+ - Quote 118 Linked In Share Button - Quote 118 My rule in which I have always found satisfaction, is never to turn aside in public affairs through views of private interest, but to go straight forward in doing what appears to me right at the time, leaving the consequences with Providence.

Benjamin Franklin: Letter to Jane Mecom (30 Dec. 1770), Van Doren, Autobiographical Writings, p. 202

Quote 322 details Share on Google+ - Quote 322 Linked In Share Button - Quote 322 Every new regulation concerning commerce or revenue; or in any manner affecting the value of the different species of property, presents a new harvest to those who watch the change and can trace its consequences; a harvest reared not by themselves but by the toils and cares of the great body of their fellow citizens. This is a state of things in which it may be said with some truth that laws are made for the few not for the many.

James Madison: Federalist No. 62, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 618 details Share on Google+ - Quote 618 Linked In Share Button - Quote 618 They made an early provision by law that every town consisting of so many families should be always furnished with a grammar school. They made it a crime for such a town to be destitute of a grammar schoolmaster for a few months, and subjected it to a heavy penalty. So that the education of all ranks of people was made the care and expense of the public, in a manner that I believe has been unknown to any other people, ancient or modern. The consequences of these establishments we see and feel every day [written in 1765]. A native of America who cannot read and write is as rare ... as a comet or an earthquake

John Adams: Unknown

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My rule, in which I have always found satisfaction, is, never to turn aside in public affairs through views of private interest; but to go straight forward in doing what appears to me right at the time, leaving the consequences with Providence.


Quote 793 details Share on Google+ - Quote 793 Linked In Share Button - Quote 793 This is the most magnificent movement of all! There is a dignity, a majesty, a sublimity, in this last effort of the patriots that I greatly admire. The people should never rise without doing something to be remembered - something notable and striking. This destruction of the tea is so bold, so daring, so firm, intrepid and inflexible, and it must be so important consequences, and so lasting, that I cant but consider it an epocha in history!

John Adams: his diary entry on the Boston Tea party - December 17, 1773

Quote 810 details Share on Google+ - Quote 810 Linked In Share Button - Quote 810 We live, my dear soul, in an age of trial. What will be the consequences, I know not.

John Adams: Letter to Abigail Adams, 1774

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The free men of America did not wait till usurped power had strengthened itself by exercise, and entangled the question in precedents. They saw all the consequences in the principle, and they avoided the consequences by denying the principle. We revere this lesson too much soon to forget it. Who does not see that the same authority which can establish Christianity, in exclusion of all other Religions, may establish with the same ease any particular sect of Christians, in exclusion of all other Sects? that the same authority which can force a citizen to contribute three pence only of his property for the support of any one establishment, may force him to conform to any other establishment in all cases whatsoever?

James Madison: Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments, 1785

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In giving a definition of the simple kinds of government known throughout the world, I have occasion to describe what I meant by a democracy; and I think I termed it, that government in which the people retain the supreme power, and exercise it either collectively or by representation. This constitution declares this principle, in its terms an din its consequences, which is evident from the manner in which it is announced. "We, the People of the United States."

James Wilson: Pennsylvania Ratification Convention, November 26, 1787

Quote 960 details Share on Google+ - Quote 960 Linked In Share Button - Quote 960 For if Men are to be precluded from offering their Sentiments on a matter, which may involve the most serious and alarming consequences, that can invite the consideration of Mankind, reason is of not use to us; the freedom of Speech may be taken away, and dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep, to the Slaughter.


Quote 1176 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1176 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1176 Some gentlemen have inveterate prejudices against all attempts to increase the powers of Congress, others see the necessity but fear the consequences. It is propos’d by the latter and former classes that Congress form and recommend a navigation act to the states, to continue in form for a limited time.


Quote 1177 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1177 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1177 I can meet you and will if it is approved with 100. horse on the frontier of the state, and conduct you here or home, or if military parade is declined and civil preferr’d a like attention might be shewn by me & such of the council as wod. unite. Perhaps a military parade with me at its head might set a bad precedent & lead to bad consequences hereafter, it being but a step to other things, especially when foreign powers are so disposed to interfere in our elections.


Quote 1190 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1190 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1190 If men are to be precluded from offering their sentiments on a matter which may involve the most serious and alarming consequences that can invite the consideration of mankind, reason is of no use to us…My brave fellows, you have done all I asked you to do, and more than can be reasonably expected; but your country is at stake, your wives, your houses and all that you hold dear. You have worn yourselves out with fatigues and hardships, but we know not how to spare you. If you will consent to stay one month longer, you will render that service to the cause of liberty, and to your country, which you probably can never do under any other circumstances.

George Washington: December, 31, 1776

Quote 1321 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1321 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1321 I think the difference is very great. An external tax is a duty laid on commodities imported; that duty is added to the first cost, and other charges on the commodity, and when it is offered to sale, makes a part of the price. If the people do not like it at that price, they refuse it; they are not obliged to pay it. But an internal tax is forced from the people without their consent, if not laid by their own representatives. The Stamp Act says, we shall have no commerce, make no exchange of property with each other, neither purchase nor grant, nor recover debts; we shall neither marry nor make our wills, unless we pay such sums, and thus it is intended to extort our money from us, or ruin us by the consequences of refusing to pay for it.

Benjamin Franklin: Examination of Dr. Benjamin Franklin in the House of Commons - 1766

Quote 1344 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1344 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1344 The tumultuous populace of large cities are ever to be dreaded. Their indiscriminate violence prostrates for the time all public authority, and its consequences are sometimes extensive and terrible.

George Washington: To Marquis de Lafayette, July 28,1791
The Quotable Founding Fathers



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