Site Search for: DEBT

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FATHER: Alexander Hamilton


Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 July 12, 1804) was the first United States Secretary of the Treasury, a Founding Father, economist, and political philosopher. He led calls for the Philadelphia Convention, was one of America's first Constitutional lawyers, and cowro[MORE]

ARTICLE: Samuel Adams - Dissident Founding Father


If you had to pick one founding father who was the most dissident, rabble-rousing patriot, it would have to be Samuel Adams. Without him, U.S. citizens would probably still be paying taxes to buy down England's war debts.[MORE]

ARTICLE: Thomas Jefferson - Author of the Declaration of Independence


When we think of Thomas Jefferson we remember him as one of Founding Fathers and the Declaration of Independence. In addition to the weight of the responsibility in being the principal author of such a great document, he also went on to do so much more for us all. His leadership [MORE]

ARTICLE: The Failure of the Founders of The US Constitution


Several years ago I began to feel overwhelmed by all the reports coming from Washington, especially the multitude of deficit spending and I decided to get involved. I began asking myself if the Founders may have overlooked something in the U.S. Constitution which could have preve[MORE]

ARTICLE: Interview with Benjamin Franklin


It was my honor to sit down with Benjamin Franklin to discuss his views on some of the common topics of the day as well as his view of what the "American Dream" is. The following post contains that interview and some interesting facts about Benjamin Franklin.[MORE]

ARTICLE: Private Enterprise Regained


Essay on Liberty by Henry Hazlitt - June 27, 1949.[MORE]

ARTICLE: Show Me Any Other Country


AMERICANS, in general, regard socialism as something alien and unrelated to America, and would never consider joining the Socialist party. Yet, they clamor loudly for every piece of socialistic legislation which is offered-so long as it is sugar-coated with an American label or w[MORE]

ARTICLE: Equal Protection, the US Consitition, and the George Washington Connection


Whenever laws aren't explicitly stipulated in the American Constitution (and when it comes to constitutional law, nothing is explicit), each state takes advantage of the wiggle room to create and maintain its own legal code. Although this gives states a lot of leeway in areas, pr[MORE]

BOOK: The Constitution, a Heavenly Banner


The Constitution: A Heavenly Banner, and Other Great Constutional Speeches by Ezra Taft Benson, David O. McKay, J. Reuben Clark, Jr. and Bruce R. McConkie" There are many talks, articles, and teachings from the leadership of the LDS Church which pertain to the Constitution of the[MORE]

PEOPLE: Deborah Franklin


Deborah Read Franklin (about 1708 – December 19, 1774) was the spouse of Benjamin Franklin, a prominent inventor, printer, thinker, revolutionary and Founding Father of the United States. Franklin proposed to Read in 1724 when he was eighteen years old, but her mother would [MORE]

Quote 57 details Share on Google+ - Quote 57 Linked In Share Button - Quote 57
We must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Samuel Kercheval, July 12, 1816

Quote 125 details Share on Google+ - Quote 125 Linked In Share Button - Quote 125 As to Taxes, they are evidently inseparable from Government. It is impossible without them to pay the debts of the nation, to protect it from foreign danger, or to secure individuals from lawless violence and rapine.

Alexander Hamilton: Address to the Electors of the State of New York, March, 1801

Quote 255 details Share on Google+ - Quote 255 Linked In Share Button - Quote 255 But with respect to future debt; would it not be wise and just for that nation to declare in the constitution they are forming that neither the legislature, nor the nation itself can validly contract more debt, than they may pay within their own age, or within the term of 19 years.

Thomas Jefferson: September 6, 1789

Quote 340 details Share on Google+ - Quote 340 Linked In Share Button - Quote 340 Is it not the glory of the people of America, that whilst they have paid a decent regard to the opinions of former times and other nations, they have not suffered a blind veneration for antiquity, for custom, or for names, to overrule the suggestions of their own good sense, the knowledge of their own situation, and the lessons of their own experience? To this manly spirit, posterity will be indebted for the possession, and the world for the example of the numerous innovations displayed on the American theatre, in favor of private rights and public happiness

James Madison: Federalist No. 14, November 30, 1787
The Federalist Papers

Quote 387 details Share on Google+ - Quote 387 Linked In Share Button - Quote 387 To the press alone, checkered as it is with abuses, the world is indebted for all the triumphs which have been gained by reason and humanity over error and oppression.

James Madison: Report on the Virginia Resolutions, 1798

Quote 409 details Share on Google+ - Quote 409 Linked In Share Button - Quote 409 As parents, we can have no joy, knowing that this government is not sufficiently lasting to ensure any thing which we may bequeath to posterity: And by a plain method of argument, as we are running the next generation into debt, we ought to do the work of it, otherwise we use them meanly and pitifully. In order to discover the line of our duty rightly, we should take our children in our hand, and fix our station a few years farther into life; that eminence will present a prospect, which a few present fears and prejudices conceal from our sight.

Thomas Paine: Common Sense, 1776
Quoted Document: Common Sense - Thomas Paine

Quote 484 details Share on Google+ - Quote 484 Linked In Share Button - Quote 484 No pecuniary consideration is more urgent, than the regular redemption and discharge of the public debt: on none can delay be more injurious, or an economy of time more valuable.

George Washington: Message to the House of Representatives, December 3, 1793

Quote 556 details Share on Google+ - Quote 556 Linked In Share Button - Quote 556 I could dwell on the importance of piety and religion; of industry and frugality; of prudence, economy, regularity and an even government; all which are essential to the well-being of a family. But I have not Time. I cannot however help repeating Piety, because I think it indispensible. Religion in a Family is at once its brightest Ornament & its best Security. The first Point of Justice, says a Writer I have met with, consists in Piety; Nothing certainly being so great a Debt upon us, as to render to the Creator & Preserver those Acknowledgments which are due to Him for our Being, and the hourly Protection he affords us.

Samuel Adams: Letter to Thomas Wells, November 22, 1780

Quote 630 details Share on Google+ - Quote 630 Linked In Share Button - Quote 630 It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world.


Quote 736 details Share on Google+ - Quote 736 Linked In Share Button - Quote 736 Of all the enemies to public liberty, war is, perhaps, the most to be dreaded, because it comprises and develops the germ of every other. War is the parent of armies; from these proceed debts and taxes; and armies, and debts, and taxes are the known instruments for bringing the many under the domination of the few. In war, too, the discretionary power of the Executive is extended; its influence in dealing out offices, honors, and emoluments is multiplied; and all the means of seducing the minds are added to those of subduing the force of the people. The same malignant aspect in republicanism may be traced in the inequality of fortunes and the opportunities of fraud growing out of a state of war, and in the degeneracy of manners and of morals engendered by both. No nation could reserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.

James Madison: Political Observations, April 20, 1795

Quote 924 details Share on Google+ - Quote 924 Linked In Share Button - Quote 924 And to preserve their independence, we must not let our rules load us with perpetual debt. We must make our election between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude.


Quote 925 details Share on Google+ - Quote 925 Linked In Share Button - Quote 925 I am for a government rigorously frugal & simple, applying all the possible savings of the public revenue to the discharge of the national debt; and not for the multiplication of officers & salaries merely to make partisans, & for increasing, by every device, the public debt, on the principle of it's being a public blessing.


Quote 926 details Share on Google+ - Quote 926 Linked In Share Button - Quote 926 I, however, place economy among the first and most important of republican virtues, and public debt as the greatest of the dangers to be feared.


Quote 1167 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1167 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1167 The multiplication of public offices, increase of expense beyond income, growth and entailment of a public debt, are indications soliciting the employment of the pruning knife.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Spencer Roane, 1821

Quote 1171 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1171 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1171 The more I have reflected on the subject, the better satisfied I am of the impolicy of assuming the state debts. The diminishing the necessity for State taxation will undoubtedly leave the national government more at liberty to exercise its powers and encrease the subjects on which it will act, for that purpose, and if that were absolutely a necessary power of the government, and no objections applied to the transfer itself of the publick creditors from one government to the other, without their consent, (for such a modification as leaves them not even a plausible alternative, amounts to the same thing, and such I understand the report to be) or to the probable inefficiency of the national government comparatively with those of the States in raising the necessary funds, I should perhaps have no objections to it at present.




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