Site Search for: HAPPINESS

Search Results (72 items)


Jump to Search Page:
[1] 2 3

Results 1-25

ARTICLE: Thomas Jefferson - Author of the Declaration of Independence


When we think of Thomas Jefferson we remember him as one of Founding Fathers and the Declaration of Independence. In addition to the weight of the responsibility in being the principal author of such a great document, he also went on to do so much more for us all. His leadership [MORE]

ARTICLE: I Am America


This text is written from the point of view, that if the land of America could talk, what it may say to the people, telling them of the freedom that can be had in America. Quotes from some of the greatest men that this nation has ever known. The great diversity that is this great[MORE]

ARTICLE: American Morality - A Glimmer of Hope on the Horizon


Has the United States lost it's basic principle of morality? Has the United States moved away from the guiding principles that this country was founded on?[MORE]

ARTICLE: Interview with Benjamin Franklin


It was my honor to sit down with Benjamin Franklin to discuss his views on some of the common topics of the day as well as his view of what the "American Dream" is. The following post contains that interview and some interesting facts about Benjamin Franklin.[MORE]

ARTICLE: American Revolution and War for Independence


This paper is dedicated to the history of American Revolution and the War for Independence. The primary purpose of the survey given here is to carry out an analysis of the events of the late 18th century in the British colonies in North America on the basis of vast historical mat[MORE]

ARTICLE: Continental Association created by the Articles of Association


The Continental Association, often known simply as the “Association“, was a system created by the First Continental Congress on October 20, 1774, for implementing a trade boycott with Great Britain. Congress hoped that by imposing economic sanctions, Great Britain wou[MORE]

ARTICLE: The Women's Right's Movement


Women have been fighting for equality as long as people can remember. In most of the world women still have no rights and have to submit to men. There are still countries in which women are not allowed to do anything without the permission of a man.[MORE]

ARTICLE: That Something


AMERICA has been different from any other nation on earth. Here is why. The men who cut the pattern for Americans a century and three-quarters ago, held a deep conviction that men-all men-are born with qualities that give them a unique status.[MORE]

ARTICLE: Declaration of Independence - What It Means Now


The following is last chapter in a book called, “The Story of the Declaration of Independence”. Malone, Dumas (1954) The Story of the Declaration of Independence, New York: Oxford University Press. This chapter is found on pages 266-268 and is included in its entirety below[MORE]

ARTICLE: Analysis and Effect of the Declaration of Independence


The Declaration may be divided into three parts, and it put an end to the inconsistency of the colonial position.[MORE]

Quote 38 details Share on Google+ - Quote 38 Linked In Share Button - Quote 38 Marriage is...the most natural state of man, and therefore the state in which you are most likely to find solid happiness.... It is the man and woman united that makes the complete human being..... man has not nearly the value he would have in the state of union. He is an incomplete animal; he resembles the odd half of a pair of scissors.

Benjamin Franklin: "Advice on the Choice of a Mistress" ( 25 Jun 1745

Quote 70 details Share on Google+ - Quote 70 Linked In Share Button - Quote 70
Government is instituted for the common good; for the protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness of the people; and not for profit, honor, or private interest of any one man, family, or class of men; therefore, the people alone have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to institute government; and to reform, alter, or totally change the same, when their protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness require it.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 79 details Share on Google+ - Quote 79 Linked In Share Button - Quote 79 If there is a form of government, then, whose principle and foundation is virtue, will not every sober man acknowledge it better calculated to promote the general happiness than any other form?

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 106 details Share on Google+ - Quote 106 Linked In Share Button - Quote 106 Upon this point all speculative politicians will agree, that the happiness of society is the end of government, as all divines and moral philosophers will agree that the happiness of the individual is the end of man. From this principle it will follow that the form of government which communicates ease, comfort, security, or, in one word, happiness, to the greatest numbers of persons, and in the greatest degree, is the best.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 108 details Share on Google+ - Quote 108 Linked In Share Button - Quote 108 We ought to consider what is the end of government before we determine which is the best form. Upon this point all speculative politicians will agree that the happiness of society is the end of government, as all divines and moral philosophers will agree that the happiness of the individual is the end of man....All sober inquirers after truth, ancient and modern, pagan and Christian, have declared that the happiness of man, as well as his dignity, consists in virtue.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 261 details Share on Google+ - Quote 261 Linked In Share Button - Quote 261 Neither the wisest constitution nor the wisest laws will secure the liberty and happiness of a people whose manners are universally corrupt.

Samuel Adams: Essay in the Public Advertiser, 1749

Quote 276 details Share on Google+ - Quote 276 Linked In Share Button - Quote 276 Much of the Strength and Efficiency of any Government in procuring and securing Happiness to the People depends on Opinion, on the general Opinion of the Goodness of that Government as well as of the Wisdom and Integrity of its Governors. I hope therefore that for our own Sakes, as a Part of the People, and for the sake of our Posterity we shall act heartily and unanimously in recommending this Constitution, wherever our Influence may extend, and turn our future Thoughts and Endeavors to the Means of having it well administered.

Benjamin Franklin: Speech on Sept. 17 1787

Quote 337 details Share on Google+ - Quote 337 Linked In Share Button - Quote 337 In Europe, charters of liberty have been granted by power. America has set the example ... of charters of power granted by liberty. This revolution in the practice of the world, may, with an honest praise, be pronounced the most triumphant epoch of its history, and the most consoling presage of its happiness.

James Madison: National Gazette Essay, January 18, 1792

Quote 340 details Share on Google+ - Quote 340 Linked In Share Button - Quote 340 Is it not the glory of the people of America, that whilst they have paid a decent regard to the opinions of former times and other nations, they have not suffered a blind veneration for antiquity, for custom, or for names, to overrule the suggestions of their own good sense, the knowledge of their own situation, and the lessons of their own experience? To this manly spirit, posterity will be indebted for the possession, and the world for the example of the numerous innovations displayed on the American theatre, in favor of private rights and public happiness

James Madison: Federalist No. 14, November 30, 1787
The Federalist Papers

Quote 341 details Share on Google+ - Quote 341 Linked In Share Button - Quote 341 Is there no virtue among us? If there be not, we are in a wretched situation. No theoretical checks-no form of government can render us secure. To suppose that any form of government will secure liberty or happiness without any virtue in the people, is a chimerical idea, if there be sufficient virtue and intelligence in the community, it will be exercised in the selection of these men. So that we do not depend on their virtue, or put confidence in our rulers, but in the people who are to choose them.

James Madison: speech at the Virginia Ratifying Convention, June 20, 1788

Quote 390 details Share on Google+ - Quote 390 Linked In Share Button - Quote 390 We have heard of the impious doctrine in the old world, that the people were made for kings, not kings for the people. Is the same doctrine to be revived in the new, in another shape — that the solid happiness of the people is to be sacrificed to the views of political institutions of a different form? It is too early for politicians to presume on our forgetting that the public good, the real welfare of the great body of the people, is the supreme object to be pursued; and that no form of government whatever has any other value than as it may be fitted for the attainment of this object.

James Madison: Federalist No. 45, January 26, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 406 details Share on Google+ - Quote 406 Linked In Share Button - Quote 406 [T]o exclude foreign intrigues and foreign partialities, so degrading to all countries and so baneful to free ones; to foster a spirit of independence too just to invade the rights of others, too proud to surrender our own, too liberal to indulge unworthy prejudices ourselves and too elevated not to look down upon them in others; to hold the union of the States on the basis of their peace and happiness; to support the Constitution, which is the cement of the Union, as well in its limitations as in its authorities; to respect the rights and authorities reserved to the States and to the people as equally incorporated with and essential to the success of the general... as far as sentiments and intentions such as these can aid the fulfillment of my duty, they will be a resource which can not fail me.

James Madison: Second Inaugural Address, March, 1813

Quote 1362 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1362 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1362 All men are created equally free and independent, and have certain ihherent rights, of which they cannont, by any compact, deprive or divest their prosterity: among which are the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing the obtaining happiness and safety.

George Mason: First draft, Virginia Declaration of Rights, 1776
The Quotable Founding Fathers

Quote 452 details Share on Google+ - Quote 452 Linked In Share Button - Quote 452 I have always considered marriage as the most interesting event of one`s life, the foundation of happiness or misery.

George Washington: letter to Burwell Bassett, May 23, 1785

Quote 460 details Share on Google+ - Quote 460 Linked In Share Button - Quote 460 In our progress toward political happiness my station is new; and if I may use the expression, I walk on untrodden ground. There is scarcely any part of my conduct which may not hereafter be drawn into precedent.

George Washington: letter to Catherine Macaulay Graham, January 9, 1790



[1] 2 3