Site Search for: MILITIA

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FATHER: William Floyd


William Floyd (December 17, 1734 – August 4, 1821), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New York. He was born in Brookhaven, Long Island, New York into a family of Welsh origin and took over the family farm when his father died[MORE]

FATHER: Thomas Heyward


Thomas Heyward, Jr. (July 28, 1746 – March 6, 1809), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence and of the Articles of Confederation as a representative of South Carolina. He was born in St. Luke's Parish, South Carolina and educated at home, then traveled t[MORE]

FATHER: Caesar Rodney


Caesar Rodney (October 7, 1728 – June 26, 1784), was an American lawyer and politician from St. Jones Neck, in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, east of Dover. He was an officer of the Delaware militia during the French and Indian War and the American Revolution, a signer of [MORE]

FATHER: James Smith


James Smith (September 17, 1719 – July 11, 1806), was a signer to the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Pennsylvania. He was born in Province of Ulster, Ireland; his family immigrated to Chester County, Pennsylvania, when he was about ten years o[MORE]

FATHER: Matthew Thornton


Matthew Thornton (1714 – June 24, 1803), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New Hampshire. He was born in Ireland: his family immigrated to America when he was three years old, settling first at Wiscasset, Maine, and removing s[MORE]

FATHER: William Williams


William Williams (April 23, 1731-August 2, 1811) was a merchant, and a delegate for Connecticut to the Continental Congress in 1776, and a signatory of the Declaration of Independence. Williams was born in Lebanon, Connecticut the son of a minister, Tim Solomon Williams, and Mary[MORE]

FATHER: Oliver Wolcott


Oliver Wolcott (December 1, 1726 – December 1, 1797) was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence and also the Articles of Confederation as a representative of Connecticut. Oliver Wolcott was born in Windsor, Connecticut, the youngest of fourteen children of t[MORE]

FATHER: Alexander Hamilton


Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 – July 12, 1804) was the first United States Secretary of the Treasury, a Founding Father, economist, and political philosopher. He led calls for the Philadelphia Convention, was one of America's first Constitutional lawyers, and cowro[MORE]

ARTICLE: American Revolution and War for Independence


This paper is dedicated to the history of American Revolution and the War for Independence. The primary purpose of the survey given here is to carry out an analysis of the events of the late 18th century in the British colonies in North America on the basis of vast historical mat[MORE]

ARTICLE: George Washington - The Best President?


George Washington is a much-admired person in many respects. As the first president of the United States, he set the course upon which the current three-branch system of federal government is based. George Washington is perhaps the one person who can most claim the title of Found[MORE]

ARTICLE: The Secret History of Firearms


The eighth-grade students gathering on the west lawn of the state capitol in Sacramento were planning to lunch on fried chicken with California's new governor, Ronald Reagan, and then tour the granite building constructed a century earlier to resemble the nation's Capitol. But th[MORE]

PEOPLE: James Lloyd


James Lloyd (1745–1820) was an American politician. Lloyd as born at Farley (now Fairlee) near Chestertown, Maryland. He pursued classical studies and studied law, was admitted to the bar, and commenced practice. He was commissioned second lieutenant in the Kent County milit[MORE]

Quote 105 details Share on Google+ - Quote 105 Linked In Share Button - Quote 105 To suppose arms in the hands of citizens, to be used at individual discretion, except in private self-defense, or by partial orders of towns, counties or districts of a state, is to demolish every constitution, and lay the laws prostrate, so that liberty can be enjoyed by no man; it is a dissolution of the government. The fundamental law of the militia is, that it be created, directed and commanded by the laws, and ever for the support of the laws.

John Adams: A Defense of the Constitutions of the United States, 1787-1788

Quote 144 details Share on Google+ - Quote 144 Linked In Share Button - Quote 144 If a well-regulated militia be the most natural defense of a free country, it ought certainly to be under the regulation and at the disposal of that body which is constituted the guardian of the national security. If standing armies are dangerous to liberty, an efficacious power over the militia in the same body ought, as far as possible, to take away the inducement and the pretext to such unfriendly institutions. If the federal government can command the aid of the militia in those emergencies which call for the military arm in support of the civil magistrate, it can the better dispense with the employment of a different kind of force. If it cannot avail itself of the former, it will be obliged to recur to the latter. To render an army unnecessary will be a more certain method of preventing its existence than a thousand prohibitions upon paper.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 29, January 10, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 217 details Share on Google+ - Quote 217 Linked In Share Button - Quote 217 There is something so far-fetched and so extravagant in the idea of danger to liberty from the militia that one is at a loss whether to treat it with gravity or with raillery; whether to consider it as a mere trial of skill, like the paradoxes of rhetoricians; as a disingenuous artifice to instill prejudices at any price; or as the serious.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 29, January 10, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 312 details Share on Google+ - Quote 312 Linked In Share Button - Quote 312 Besides the advantage of being armed, which the Americans possess over the people of almost every other nation, the existence of subordinate governments, to which the people are attached and by which the militia officers are appointed, forms a barrier against the enterprises of ambition, more insurmountable than any which a simple government of any form can admit of.

James Madison: Federalist No. 48, February 1, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 578 details Share on Google+ - Quote 578 Linked In Share Button - Quote 578
A militia when properly formed are in fact the people themselves... and include all men capable of bearing arms. . . To preserve liberty it is essential that the whole body of people always possess arms.

Richard Henry Lee: Senator, First Congress

Quote 579 details Share on Google+ - Quote 579 Linked In Share Button - Quote 579 Whenever governments mean to invade the rights and liberties of the people, they always attempt to destroy the militia, in order to raise an army upon their ruins.


Quote 701 details Share on Google+ - Quote 701 Linked In Share Button - Quote 701 A militia, when properly formed, are in fact the people themselves. They include all men capable of bearing arms. To preserve liberty is essential that the whole body of people always possess arms and be taught alike how to use them.


Quote 1063 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1063 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1063 We have reason to be thankful to God for the success of the arms of the U.S. the last year of the war, both at sea and land; it is true, the enemy got possession of the city of Washington (an unfortified and open town) and retained it four & twenty hours, but they were beaten at Baltimore, Chippewa, Bridgetown, Erie, with equal numbers; on Lake Champlain and at Plattsburgh a glorious victory was obtained over them by inferior numbers, and to crown the whole, they sustained a most signal defeat at New-Orleans by a still less proportion of combatants, the great majority of whom were Militia, brave but undisciplined. By these events our Independence is strengthened and the American character exalted. We may now reasonably hope for a durable peace, altho’ we must expect annoyances, while there are wars in Europe between the countries with whom we trade.

Thomas McKean: letter to John Adams, 1 July 1815

Quote 1131 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1131 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1131 That the people have a Right to mass and to bear arms; that a well regulated militia composed of the Body of the people, trained to arms, is the proper natural and safe defense of a free state, that standing armies, in time of peace, are dangerous to liberty, and therefore ought to be avoided.

George Mason: Draft proposal, 3 Elliot, Debates at 659.

Quote 1180 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1180 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1180 It may be laid down, as a primary position, and the basis of our system, that every citizen who enjoys the
protection of a free government, owes not only a proportion of his property, but even of his personal
services to the defence of it, and consequently that the Citizens of America (with a few legal and official
exceptions) from 18 to 50 Years of Age should be borne on the Militia Rolls, provided with uniform
Arms, and so far accustomed to the use of them, that the Total strength of the Country might be called
forth at Short Notice on any very interesting Emergency.

George Washington: letter to Alexander Hamilton (2 May 1783)

Quote 1189 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1189 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1189 To place any dependence upon militia, is, assuredly, resting upon a broken staff. Men just dragged from the tender scenes of domestic life – unaccustomed to the din of arms – totally unacquainted with every kind of military skill, which being followed by a want of confidence in themselves when opposed to troops regularly trained, disciplined, and appointed, superior in knowledge, and superior in arms, makes them timid and ready to fly from their own shadows.

George Washington: letter to the president of Congress, Heights of Harlem, September 24, 1776

Quote 1285 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1285 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1285 If it be the pleasure of Heaven that my country shall require the poor offering of my life, the victim shall be ready, at the appointed hour of sacrifice, come within that hour may. But while I do live, let me have a country and that a free country.

John Adams: letter to First Brigade of the Third Division of the Militia, October 11, 1798
Web Source: http://ringthebellsoffreedom.com/Quotes/jadamscontent.htm
America's God and Country (Encyclopedia of Quotations)

Quote 1288 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1288 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1288 The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. A well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trained to arms, is the best and most natural defense of a free country.

James Madison: I Annals of Congress 434, June 8, 1789



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