Site Search for: POLICY

Search Results (25 items)


Jump to Search Page:
[1]

Results 1-25

FATHER: Alexander Hamilton


Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 July 12, 1804) was the first United States Secretary of the Treasury, a Founding Father, economist, and political philosopher. He led calls for the Philadelphia Convention, was one of America's first Constitutional lawyers, and cowro[MORE]

FATHER: John Jay


Was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat, a Founding Father of the United States, President of the Continental Congress from 1778 to 1779 and, from 1789 to 1795, the first Chief Justice of the United States. During and after the American Revolution, he was a[MORE]

ARTICLE: The Failure of the Founders of The US Constitution


Several years ago I began to feel overwhelmed by all the reports coming from Washington, especially the multitude of deficit spending and I decided to get involved. I began asking myself if the Founders may have overlooked something in the U.S. Constitution which could have preve[MORE]

ARTICLE: American Revolution and War for Independence


This paper is dedicated to the history of American Revolution and the War for Independence. The primary purpose of the survey given here is to carry out an analysis of the events of the late 18th century in the British colonies in North America on the basis of vast historical mat[MORE]

ARTICLE: Democracy or Republic?


Despite clear historical evidence showing that the United States was established as a republic and not a democracy, there is still confusion regarding the difference between these two very different systems of government.  Some confusion stems because the word “democracy” is[MORE]

ARTICLE: Show Me Any Other Country


AMERICANS, in general, regard socialism as something alien and unrelated to America, and would never consider joining the Socialist party. Yet, they clamor loudly for every piece of socialistic legislation which is offered-so long as it is sugar-coated with an American label or w[MORE]

ARTICLE: The First Leftist


Our founding fathers, along with the first Leftists who were of the same political faith, were well aware that individual freedom and personal responsibility for one's own welfare are equal and inseparable parts of the same truth. They knew that history amply supports this tru[MORE]

ARTICLE: Liberalism Stands for Freedom


THE story about the Grand Inquisitor in Dostoevsky's novel, The Brothers Karamazov, pictures Christ as appearing in the streets of Seville during the Spanish Inquisition just as a large number of heretics had been burned at the stake. The Grand Inquisitor arrested Christ, visited[MORE]

PEOPLE: Jonathan Shipley


Jonathan Shipley (1714 – 6 December 1788) was the son of a London stationer; his mother's family were owners of Twyford House, a large manor in Winchester, England.[1] He was ordained a minister in the Church of England and became both Bishop of Llandaff and Bishop of St Asaph.[MORE]

VIDEO: James Monroe Facts and Biography


US President James Monroe served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, served as Ambassador to France, and even served as governor of Virginia before becoming president. He was a popular president who is credited with creating a foreign policy that lasted longer t[MORE]

Quote 34 details Share on Google+ - Quote 34 Linked In Share Button - Quote 34
History affords us many instances of the ruin of states, by the prosecution of measures ill suited to the temper and genius of their people. The ordaining of laws in favor of one part of the nation, to the prejudice and oppression of another, is certainly the most erroneous and mistaken policy. An equal dispensation of protection, rights, privileges, and advantages, is what every part is entitled to, and ought to enjoy... These measures never fail to create great and violent jealousies and animosities between the people favored and the people oppressed; whence a total separation of affections, interests, political obligations, and all manner of connections, by which the whole state is weakened.

Benjamin Franklin: Emblematical Representations, Circa 1774

Quote 344 details Share on Google+ - Quote 344 Linked In Share Button - Quote 344 It is a principle incorporated into the settled policy of America, that as peace is better than war, war is better than tribute.

James Madison: letter to the Dey of Algiers, August, 1816

Quote 373 details Share on Google+ - Quote 373 Linked In Share Button - Quote 373 The house of representatives...can make no law which will not have its full operation on themselves and their friends, as well as the great mass of society. This has always been deemed one of the strongest bonds by which human policy can connect the rulers and the people together. It creates between them that communion of interest, and sympathy of sentiments, of which few governments have furnished examples; but without which every government degenerates into tyranny.

James Madison: Federalist No. 57, February 19, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 430 details Share on Google+ - Quote 430 Linked In Share Button - Quote 430 `Tis our true policy to steer clear of permanent Alliances, with any portion of the foreign world.

George Washington: Farewell Address, September 19, 1796

Quote 446 details Share on Google+ - Quote 446 Linked In Share Button - Quote 446 Harmony, liberal intercourse with all Nations, are recommended by policy, humanity and interest. But even our Commercial policy should hold an equal and impartial hand: neither seeking nor granting exclusive favours or preferences; consulting the natural course of things; diffusing and diversifying by gentle means the streams of Commerce, but forcing nothing; establishing with Powers so disposed; in order to give trade a stable course.

George Washington: Farewell Address, September 19, 1796

Quote 458 details Share on Google+ - Quote 458 Linked In Share Button - Quote 458 I wish from my soul that the legislature of this State could see a policy of a gradual Abolition of Slavery.

George Washington: letter to Lawrence Lewis, August 4, 1797

Quote 470 details Share on Google+ - Quote 470 Linked In Share Button - Quote 470 Jealousy, and local policy mix too much in all our public councils for the good government of the Union. In a words, the confederation appears to me to be little more than a shadow without the substance....

George Washington: letter to James Warren, October 7, 1785

Quote 479 details Share on Google+ - Quote 479 Linked In Share Button - Quote 479 My policy has been, and will continue to be, while I have the honor to remain in the administration of the government, to be upon friendly terms with, but independent of, all the nations of the earth. To share in the broils of none. To fulfill our own engagements. To supply the wants, and be carriers for them all: Being thoroughly convinced that it is our policy and interest to do so.

George Washington: letter to Gouverneur Morris, December 22, 1795

Quote 497 details Share on Google+ - Quote 497 Linked In Share Button - Quote 497 The citizens of the United States of America have the right to applaud themselves for having given to mankind examples of an enlarged and liberal policy worthy of imitation. All possess alike liberty of conscience and immunities of citizenship. It is now no more that toleration is spoken of as if it were by the indulgence of one class of citizens that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights, for happily the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens in giving it on all occasions their effectual support.

George Washington: letter to the Hebrew Congregation of Newport, Rhode Island, September 9, 1790

Quote 501 details Share on Google+ - Quote 501 Linked In Share Button - Quote 501
The foundations of our national policy will be laid in the pure and immutable principles of private morality, and the preeminence of free government be exemplified by all the attributes which can win the affections of its citizens, and command the respect of the world.

George Washington: First Inaugural Address, April 30, 1789

Quote 512 details Share on Google+ - Quote 512 Linked In Share Button - Quote 512 There exists in the economy and course of nature, an indissoluble union between virtue and happiness; between duty and advantage; between the genuine maxims of an honest and magnanimous policy, and the solid rewards of public prosperity and felicity; since we ought to be no less persuaded that the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right, which Heaven itself has ordained.

George Washington: First Inaugural Address, April 30, 1789

Quote 646 details Share on Google+ - Quote 646 Linked In Share Button - Quote 646 It is an old adage that honesty is the best policy. This applies to public as well as private life, to states as well as individuals.


Quote 1171 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1171 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1171 The more I have reflected on the subject, the better satisfied I am of the impolicy of assuming the state debts. The diminishing the necessity for State taxation will undoubtedly leave the national government more at liberty to exercise its powers and encrease the subjects on which it will act, for that purpose, and if that were absolutely a necessary power of the government, and no objections applied to the transfer itself of the publick creditors from one government to the other, without their consent, (for such a modification as leaves them not even a plausible alternative, amounts to the same thing, and such I understand the report to be) or to the probable inefficiency of the national government comparatively with those of the States in raising the necessary funds, I should perhaps have no objections to it at present.


Quote 1178 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1178 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1178
Honesty will be found on every experiment, to be the best and only true policy; let us then as a nation be just.

George Washington: circular letter to the States, 1783
Web Source: https://founderswisdom.wordpress.com/2015/06/01/4397/

Quote 1192 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1192 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1192 Our commercial policy should hold an equal and impartial hand: neither seeking nor granting exclusive favors or preferences; consulting the natural course of things; diffusing and diversifying by gentle means the streams of commerce, but forcing nothing; establishing with powers so disposed; in order to give trade a stable course.




[1]