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FATHER: Carter Braxton


Carter Braxton (September 16, 1736 – October 10, 1797), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence and a representative of Virginia. He was born on Newington Plantation in King and Queen County, Virginia into a slave owning family and educated at the College[MORE]

FATHER: Arthur Middleton


Arthur Middleton (June 26, 1742–January 1, 1787), of Charleston, South Carolina, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. His parents were Henry Middleton and Mary Baker Williams. He was educated in Britain, at Westminster School, London, and St John's College, Cambrid[MORE]

FATHER: Robert Morris


Robert Morris, Jr. (pronounced /?m?r?s/) (January 31, 1734 – [May 8, 1806) was an American merchant, and a signer to the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the United States Constitution. He was elected to the Pennsylvania Assembly and became the Chai[MORE]

FATHER: Matthew Thornton


Matthew Thornton (1714 – June 24, 1803), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New Hampshire. He was born in Ireland: his family immigrated to America when he was three years old, settling first at Wiscasset, Maine, and removing s[MORE]

ARTICLE: The Failure of the Founders of The US Constitution


Several years ago I began to feel overwhelmed by all the reports coming from Washington, especially the multitude of deficit spending and I decided to get involved. I began asking myself if the Founders may have overlooked something in the U.S. Constitution which could have preve[MORE]

ARTICLE: American Revolution and War for Independence


This paper is dedicated to the history of American Revolution and the War for Independence. The primary purpose of the survey given here is to carry out an analysis of the events of the late 18th century in the British colonies in North America on the basis of vast historical mat[MORE]

ARTICLE: Analysis and Effect of the Declaration of Independence


The Declaration may be divided into three parts, and it put an end to the inconsistency of the colonial position.[MORE]

PEOPLE: Robert Morris


Robert Morris, Jr.(January 20, 1734 – May 8, 1806) was a Liverpool-born American merchant who financed the American Revolution and was signatory to the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the United States Constitution. He was elected to the Pennsylv[MORE]

Quote 70 details Share on Google+ - Quote 70 Linked In Share Button - Quote 70
Government is instituted for the common good; for the protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness of the people; and not for profit, honor, or private interest of any one man, family, or class of men; therefore, the people alone have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to institute government; and to reform, alter, or totally change the same, when their protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness require it.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 187 details Share on Google+ - Quote 187 Linked In Share Button - Quote 187 The circumstances that endanger the safety of nations are infinite, and for this reason no constitutional shackles can wisely be imposed on the power to which the care of it is committed.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 23, December 17, 1787
The Federalist Papers

Quote 195 details Share on Google+ - Quote 195 Linked In Share Button - Quote 195 The ingredients which constitute energy in the Executive are, first, unity; secondly, duration; thirdly, an adequate provision for its support; fourthly, competent powers. ... The ingredients which constitute safety in the republican sense are, first, a due dependence on the people, secondly, a due responsibility.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 70, March 14, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 248 details Share on Google+ - Quote 248 Linked In Share Button - Quote 248 Although in the circle of his friends, where he might be unreserved with safety, he took a free share in conversation his colloquial talents were not above mediocrity, possessing neither copiousness of ideas, nor fluency of words. In public, when called on for a sudden opinion, he was unready, short and embarrassed.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Dr. Walter Jones, January 2, 1814

Quote 277 details Share on Google+ - Quote 277 Linked In Share Button - Quote 277 During the course of administration, and in order to disturb it, the artillery of the press has been leveled against us, charged with whatsoever its licentiousness could devise or dare. These abuses of an institution so important to freedom and science are deeply to be regretted, inasmuch as they tend to lessen its usefulness and to sap its safety.

Thomas Jefferson: Second Inaugural Address, December 9, 1805

Quote 342 details Share on Google+ - Quote 342 Linked In Share Button - Quote 342 It becomes all therefore who are friends of a Government based on free principles to reflect, that by denying the possibility of a system partly federal and partly consolidated, and who would convert ours into one either wholly federal or wholly consolidated, in neither of which forms have individual rights, public order, and external safety, been all duly maintained, they aim a deadly blow at the last hope of true liberty on the face of the Earth.

James Madison: Notes on Nullification

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The reformation was preceded by the discovery of America, as if the Almighty graciously meant to open a sanctuary to the persecuted in future years, when home should afford neither friendship nor safety.

Thomas Paine: Common Sense, 1776
Quoted Document: Common Sense - Thomas Paine

Quote 1362 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1362 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1362 All men are created equally free and independent, and have certain ihherent rights, of which they cannont, by any compact, deprive or divest their prosterity: among which are the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing the obtaining happiness and safety.

George Mason: First draft, Virginia Declaration of Rights, 1776
The Quotable Founding Fathers

Quote 502 details Share on Google+ - Quote 502 Linked In Share Button - Quote 502 The hour is fast approaching, on which the Honor and Success of this army, and the safety of our bleeding Country depend. Remember officers and Soldiers, that you are Freemen, fighting for the blessings of Liberty — that slavery will be your portion, and that of your posterity, if you do not acquit yourselves like men.

George Washington: General Orders, August 23, 1776

Quote 569 details Share on Google+ - Quote 569 Linked In Share Button - Quote 569 The people alone have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to institute government and to reform, alter, or totally change the same when their protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness require it. And the federal Constitution - according to the mode prescribed therein [Article V] - has already undergone such amendments in several parts of it as from experience has been judged necessary.

Samuel Adams: the Legislature of Massachusetts, January 19, 1796

Quote 707 details Share on Google+ - Quote 707 Linked In Share Button - Quote 707 They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.


Quote 780 details Share on Google+ - Quote 780 Linked In Share Button - Quote 780 It is not choice then, but necessity that calls for Independence as the only means by which foreign Alliances can be obtained; and a proper confederation by which internal peace an Union may be secured. Contrary to our earnest, early, and repeated petitions for peace, liberty and safety, our enemies press us with war, threaten us with danger and Slavery

Richard Henry Lee: letter to Landon carter, June 2, 1776

Quote 893 details Share on Google+ - Quote 893 Linked In Share Button - Quote 893 There is no saying to what length an enterprising man may push his good fortune.

George Washington: To the New York Council of Safety, August 4, 1777

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I am first to show, that a man has a natural right to his property, to his character, to liberty, and to safety.

James Wilson: Of the Natural Rights of Individuals, 1790-1791
Quoted Document: Of the Natural Rights of Individuals

Quote 970 details Share on Google+ - Quote 970 Linked In Share Button - Quote 970
The safety and happiness of society are the objects at which all political institutions aim, and to which all such institutions must be sacrificed.


Quote 978 details Share on Google+ - Quote 978 Linked In Share Button - Quote 978 As, for the safety of society, we commit honest maniacs to Bedlam, so judges should be withdrawn from their bench, whose erroneous biases are leading us to dissolution. it may indeed injure them in fame or in fortune; but it saves the republic, which is the firs and supreme law.


Quote 1001 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1001 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1001
If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve this Union or to change its republican form, let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may tolerated where reason is left free to combat it.




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