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FATHER: John Jay


Was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat, a Founding Father of the United States, President of the Continental Congress from 1778 to 1779 and, from 1789 to 1795, the first Chief Justice of the United States. During and after the American Revolution, he was a[MORE]

FATHER: George Mason


George Mason IV (December 11, 1725 October 7, 1792) was an American Patriot, statesman and a delegate from Virginia to the U.S. Constitutional Convention. Along with James Madison, he is called the "Father of the United States Bill of Rights." For these reasons he is considered[MORE]

ARTICLE: Thomas Jefferson - Author of the Declaration of Independence


When we think of Thomas Jefferson we remember him as one of Founding Fathers and the Declaration of Independence. In addition to the weight of the responsibility in being the principal author of such a great document, he also went on to do so much more for us all. His leadership [MORE]

ARTICLE: The Failure of the Founders of The US Constitution


Several years ago I began to feel overwhelmed by all the reports coming from Washington, especially the multitude of deficit spending and I decided to get involved. I began asking myself if the Founders may have overlooked something in the U.S. Constitution which could have preve[MORE]

ARTICLE: "Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death" - But In Current Textbooks the Context of These Words is Deleted


While I didn't write or compile this mountain of support information, I would ask you offer a humble prayer of thanks for that man or woman who did. Now it my/our privilege to offer free~reprint rights to others who dare to share the truth. Respectifully ,Russ Miles [MORE]

ARTICLE: Show Me Any Other Country


AMERICANS, in general, regard socialism as something alien and unrelated to America, and would never consider joining the Socialist party. Yet, they clamor loudly for every piece of socialistic legislation which is offered-so long as it is sugar-coated with an American label or w[MORE]

FILE: An Address to the Public (Concerning Slavery)


An address to the public by Benjamin Franklin made in 1789 about slavery.[MORE]

BOOK: The Essential Wisdom of the Founding Fathers


The Essential Wisdom of the Founding Fathers collects more than three hundred inspiring and instructive quotations from the men who were present at our nation's inception. Drawn from their speeches, essays, proclamations, and declarations, the thematically arranged contents refle[MORE]

BOOK: The Founding Fathers


A completely newly researched story of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, and of the lives of the most prominent framers of the Constitution: Oliver Ellsworth, Benjamin Franklin, Nathaniel Gotham, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, George Mason, Gouverneur Morris, Charles Cot[MORE]

VIDEO: Franklin's Spark (1720-1765)


Benjamin Franklin is Philadelphia's most iconic citizen, but how did William Penn's city shape the man often called "The First American"? This episode follows Franklin from his arrival as a fugitive indentured servant to his emergence as a leader of craftsmen, civic innovator, me[MORE]

Quote 67 details Share on Google+ - Quote 67 Linked In Share Button - Quote 67 Every measure of prudence, therefore, ought to be assumed for the eventual total extirpation of slavery from the United States.... I have, throughout my whole life, held the practice of slavery in... abhorrence.

John Adams: letter to Evans, June 8, 1819

Quote 288 details Share on Google+ - Quote 288 Linked In Share Button - Quote 288 He [King George] has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred right of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating & carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither.

Thomas Jefferson: deleted portion of a draft of the Declaration of Independence, June, 1776

Quote 410 details Share on Google+ - Quote 410 Linked In Share Button - Quote 410 Freedom had been hunted round the globe; reason was considered as rebellion; and the slavery of fear had made men afraid to think. But such is the irresistible nature of truth, that all it asks, and all it wants, is the liberty of appearing.

Thomas Paine: Rights of Man, 1791
Quoted Document: Rights of Man - Thomas Paine

Quote 458 details Share on Google+ - Quote 458 Linked In Share Button - Quote 458 I wish from my soul that the legislature of this State could see a policy of a gradual Abolition of Slavery.

George Washington: letter to Lawrence Lewis, August 4, 1797

Quote 502 details Share on Google+ - Quote 502 Linked In Share Button - Quote 502 The hour is fast approaching, on which the Honor and Success of this army, and the safety of our bleeding Country depend. Remember officers and Soldiers, that you are Freemen, fighting for the blessings of Liberty — that slavery will be your portion, and that of your posterity, if you do not acquit yourselves like men.

George Washington: General Orders, August 23, 1776

Quote 592 details Share on Google+ - Quote 592 Linked In Share Button - Quote 592 Among the expected glories of the Constitution, next to the abolition of Slavery was that of Rum.

George Clymer: Unknown

Quote 669 details Share on Google+ - Quote 669 Linked In Share Button - Quote 669 It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace-- but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

Patrick Henry: Unknown

Quote 706 details Share on Google+ - Quote 706 Linked In Share Button - Quote 706 Single acts of tyranny may be ascribed to the accidental opinion of a day; but a series of oppressions, begun at a distinguished period, and pursued unalterably through every change of ministers, too plainly prove a deliberate, systematical plan of reducing us to slavery


Quote 755 details Share on Google+ - Quote 755 Linked In Share Button - Quote 755 BRAVERY - COURAGE - ... we dread nothing but slavery. Death is the creature of a poltroons brains; tis immortality to sacrifice ourselves for the salvation of our country. We fear not death. That gloomy night, that pal faced moon, and the affrighted starts that hurried through the sky, can witness that we fear not death. Our hearts which, at the recollection, glow with rage that four revolving years have scarcely taught us to restrain, can witness that we fear not death...

John Hancock: Boston Massacre Oration - March 5, 1774
Quoted Document: Boston Massacre Oration

Quote 771 details Share on Google+ - Quote 771 Linked In Share Button - Quote 771 It is much to be wished that slavery may be abolished. The honor of the States, as we as justice and humanity, in my opinion loudly call upon them to emancipate these unhappy people. To contend for our own liberty, and to deny that blessing to others, involves an inconsistency not to be excused.

John Jay: to R. Lushington - March 15, 1786

Quote 780 details Share on Google+ - Quote 780 Linked In Share Button - Quote 780 It is not choice then, but necessity that calls for Independence as the only means by which foreign Alliances can be obtained; and a proper confederation by which internal peace an Union may be secured. Contrary to our earnest, early, and repeated petitions for peace, liberty and safety, our enemies press us with war, threaten us with danger and Slavery

Richard Henry Lee: letter to Landon carter, June 2, 1776

Quote 790 details Share on Google+ - Quote 790 Linked In Share Button - Quote 790 We all think ourselves happy under Great Britain. We love, esteem and reverence our mother country, and adore our King. And could the choice of in dependency be offered the colonies or subjection to Great Britain upon any terms above absolute slavery, I am convinced they would accept the latter.

James Otis: Rights of the British colonies Asserted and Proved - 1764
Quoted Document: The Rights of the British Colonies Asserted and Proved

Quote 798 details Share on Google+ - Quote 798 Linked In Share Button - Quote 798 And I take this opportunity to declare, that ... I will to my dying day oppose, with all the powers and faculties God has given me, all such instruments of slavery on the one hand, and villainy on the other, as this writ of assistance is. it appears to me ... the worst instrument of arbitrary power, the most destructive of English liberty, and the fundamental principles of the constitution, that ever was found in the English law-book.

James Otis: Argument against the writs of assistance - February 1761

Quote 801 details Share on Google+ - Quote 801 Linked In Share Button - Quote 801 The colonists are by the law of nature freeborn, as indeed all men are, white or black. No better reasons can be given for enslaving those of any color than such as Baron Montesquieu has humorously given as the foundation of that cruel slavery exercised over the poor Ethiopians, which threatens one day to reduce both Europe and America to the ignorance and barbarity of the darkest ages... Nothing better can be said in favor of a trade that is most shocking violation of the law of nature, has a direct tendency to diminish the idea of the inestimable value of liberty, and makes every dealer in it a tyrant, from the director of an African company to the petty chapman in needles and pins on the unhappy coast. it is clear truth that those who every day barter away another mens liberty will soon care little for their own.

James Otis: The Rights of the British colonies Asserted and Proved - 1764
Quoted Document: The Rights of the British Colonies Asserted and Proved

Quote 814 details Share on Google+ - Quote 814 Linked In Share Button - Quote 814 There is no retreat but in submission and slavery. Our chains are forged. Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston. The ware is inevitable. And let it come! I repeat it, sire, let it come! It is vain, sir to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen my cry, peace, peace - but there is no peace. The war is actually begun. The next gale that surveys from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms. Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand idle here? Is life so dark or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains - and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

Patrick Henry: speaking to the Virginia legislature, march 23, 1775



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