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FATHER: Patrick Henry


served as the first and sixth post-colonial Governor of Virginia from 1776 to 1779 and subsequently, from 1784 to 1786. A prominent figure in the American Revolution, Henry is known and remembered for his "Give me Liberty, or give me Death!" speech, and as one of the Founding Fat[MORE]

ARTICLE: The Failure of the Founders of The US Constitution


Several years ago I began to feel overwhelmed by all the reports coming from Washington, especially the multitude of deficit spending and I decided to get involved. I began asking myself if the Founders may have overlooked something in the U.S. Constitution which could have preve[MORE]

ARTICLE: I Am America


This text is written from the point of view, that if the land of America could talk, what it may say to the people, telling them of the freedom that can be had in America. Quotes from some of the greatest men that this nation has ever known. The great diversity that is this great[MORE]

ARTICLE: American Revolution and War for Independence


This paper is dedicated to the history of American Revolution and the War for Independence. The primary purpose of the survey given here is to carry out an analysis of the events of the late 18th century in the British colonies in North America on the basis of vast historical mat[MORE]

ARTICLE: "Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death" - But In Current Textbooks the Context of These Words is Deleted


While I didn't write or compile this mountain of support information, I would ask you offer a humble prayer of thanks for that man or woman who did. Now it my/our privilege to offer free~reprint rights to others who dare to share the truth. Respectifully ,Russ Miles [MORE]

ARTICLE: Who Signed the Declaration of Independence?


John Hancock got to sign first with his huge signature because he was the President of the Congress. It's commonly believed that John Hancock said, "There, I guess King George will be able to read that!" when he signed, referring to the King's bad vision, but there's no actual pr[MORE]

ARTICLE: The Bill of Rights


"On February 6, 1788, Massachusetts, by a narrow margin of 19 votes in a convention with a membership of 335, endorsed the new Constitution, but recommended that a bill of rights be added to protect the States from Federal encroachment on individual liberties. . . . New York ra[MORE]

ARTICLE: Liberalism Stands for Freedom


THE story about the Grand Inquisitor in Dostoevsky's novel, The Brothers Karamazov, pictures Christ as appearing in the streets of Seville during the Spanish Inquisition just as a large number of heretics had been burned at the stake. The Grand Inquisitor arrested Christ, visited[MORE]

FILE: Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death - Speech


Full text of the speech by Patrick Henry. Give me liberty, or give me death! is a quotation attributed to Patrick Henry from a speech he made to the Virginia Convention in 1775, at St. John's Church in Richmond, Virginia, he is credited with having swung[MORE]

FILE: Washington Speech to the Officers of the Continental Army


Gentlemen: By an anonymous summons, an attempt has been made to convene you together; how inconsistent with the rules of propriety! how unmilitary! and how subversive of all order and discipline, let the good sense of the Army decide.[MORE]

FILE: Against the Writs of Assistance


James Otis Speech Against the Writs of Assistance - A speech by James Otis during hte trial know as the Paxtons case.[MORE]

BOOK: The Essential Wisdom of the Founding Fathers


The Essential Wisdom of the Founding Fathers collects more than three hundred inspiring and instructive quotations from the men who were present at our nation's inception. Drawn from their speeches, essays, proclamations, and declarations, the thematically arranged contents refle[MORE]

BOOK: The Gettysburg Address and Other Writings


Abraham Lincoln is a near legendary figure in American history, and the dimensions of his legend assure many shapes based on the historical reality of his achievements. He was the quintessential self-made man who rose from humble origins to become the chief executive of his natio[MORE]

BOOK: The Constitution, a Heavenly Banner


The Constitution: A Heavenly Banner, and Other Great Constutional Speeches by Ezra Taft Benson, David O. McKay, J. Reuben Clark, Jr. and Bruce R. McConkie" There are many talks, articles, and teachings from the leadership of the LDS Church which pertain to the Constitution of the[MORE]

Quote 124 details Share on Google+ - Quote 124 Linked In Share Button - Quote 124 As riches increase and accumulate in few hands, as luxury prevails in society, virtue will be in a greater degree considered as only a graceful appendage of wealth, and the tendency of things will be to depart from the republican standard. This is the real disposition of human nature; it is what neither the honorable member nor myself can correct. It is a common misfortunate that awaits our State constitution, as well as all others.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 131 details Share on Google+ - Quote 131 Linked In Share Button - Quote 131 Good constitutions are formed upon a comparison of the liberty of the individual with the strength of government: If the tone of either be too high, the other will be weakened too much. It is the happiest possible mode of conciliating these objects, to institute one branch peculiarly endowed with sensibility, another with knowledge and firmness. Through the opposition and mutual control of these bodies, the government will reach, in its regular operations, the perfect balance between liberty and power.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 25, 1788

Quote 133 details Share on Google+ - Quote 133 Linked In Share Button - Quote 133
Here sir, the people govern; here they act by their immediate representatives.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 17, 1788
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 134 details Share on Google+ - Quote 134 Linked In Share Button - Quote 134 I am persuaded that a firm union is as necessary to perpetuate our liberties as it is to make us respectable; and experience will probably prove that the National Government will be as natural a guardian of our freedom as the State Legislatures.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 137 details Share on Google+ - Quote 137 Linked In Share Button - Quote 137 I trust that the proposed Constitution afford a genuine specimen of representative government and republican government; and that it will answer, in an eminent degree, all the beneficial purposes of society.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 138 details Share on Google+ - Quote 138 Linked In Share Button - Quote 138 I will venture to assert that no combination of designing men under heaven will be capable of making a government unpopular which is in its principles a wise and good one, and vigorous in its operations.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 156 details Share on Google+ - Quote 156 Linked In Share Button - Quote 156 It is an unquestionable truth, that the body of the people in every country desire sincerely its prosperity. But it is equally unquestionable that they do not possess the discernment and stability necessary for systematic government. To deny that they are frequently led into the grossest of errors, by misinformation and passion, would be a flattery which their own good sense must despise.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the Ratifying Convention of New York, June, 1788

Quote 160 details Share on Google+ - Quote 160 Linked In Share Button - Quote 160 It was remarked yesterday that a numerous representation was necessary to obtain the confidence of the people. This is not generally true. The confidence of the people will easily be gained by a good administration. This is the true touchstone.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 191 details Share on Google+ - Quote 191 Linked In Share Button - Quote 191 The great desiderata are a free representation and mutual checks. When these are obtained, all our apprehensions of the extent of powers are unjust and imaginary.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 193 details Share on Google+ - Quote 193 Linked In Share Button - Quote 193 The history of ancient and modern republics had taught them that many of the evils which those republics suffered arose from the want of a certain balance, and that mutual control indispensable to a wise administration. They were convinced that popular assemblies are frequently misguided by ignorance, by sudden impulses, and the intrigues of ambitious men; and that some firm barrier against these operations was necessary. They, therefore, instituted your Senate.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 199 details Share on Google+ - Quote 199 Linked In Share Button - Quote 199 The local interest of a State ought in every case to give way to the interests of the Union. For when a sacrifice of one or the other is necessary, the former becomes only an apparent, partial interest, and should yield, on the principle that the smaller good ought never to oppose the greater good.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788


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