William Paca - (1740 - 1799)

Religion: Episcopalian
William Paca on Founding Fathers Wiki Page

William Paca Biography


William Paca was born on the 31st of October, 1740. He was the second son of John Paca, a gentleman of large estate, who resided in the county of Harford, in the state of Maryland. His father, sensible of the importance of a good education, placed his son, at a proper age, in the college at Philadelphia, at that time under the care of the learned and eloquent Dr. William Smith. On commencing bachelor of arts, in 1750, he entered the office of Stephen Bradley, a distinguished lawyer of Annapolis, for file purpose of pursuing the profession of law.

Mr. Paca was a diligent student, and early gave promise of eminence in his profession. He was licensed to practice in 1761, and was admitted to the bar at the provincial court in 1764. He established himself at Annapolis, where he had for his competitors, John Price, and Samuel Chase, with the latter of whom he became intimately acquainted, and with whom he acted an important part during the revolutionary struggle.

The political career
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William Paca Genealogy

Parents:
John Paca (1712 - 1785)

Spouses:
Anne Harrison Paca (1758 - 1780)
Mary Chew Paca (1736 - 1774)

William Paca Tivia

William Paca was on the commission to oversee the construction of the Maryland State House
William Paca gave up his wealth to outfit troops for the Continental Army
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Events in the life of William Paca

DateEvent

1740 10/31   Birth of William Paca
1799 10/13   Death of William Paca
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Picture of William Paca

William Paca

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Biography for William Paca (1740 - 1799)
Biography for William Paca
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Quotes by William Paca

Quote 1105 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1105 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1105 As long Sir as Mankind shall retain a proper Sense of the Blessings of Peace Liberty and Safety, your Character in every Country and in every Age will be honor’d admir’d and rever’d: but to a Mind elevated as your’s, the Consciousness of having done Great and illustrious Deeds from the purest Principles of Patriotism; of having by your Wisdom and Magnanimity arrested the Arm of Tyranny—saved a dear Country and Millions of Fellow Citizens—and Millions yet unborn—from Slavery and all the Horrors and Calamities of Slavery, and placed their Rights and Liberties on a Permanent Foundation—must yield a Satisfaction infinitely superior to all the Pomp and Eclat of applauding Ages and admiring Worlds.

William Paca: letter to George Washington, December 20, 1783

Quote 1104 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1104 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1104 I return your Excellency Thanks for your Polite Congratulation on my Appointment to the Government of this State, and shall be happy if by my Exertions in my Department I shall be able to contribute to the general Interest and Welfare of the United States.

William Paca: letter to George Washington, April 25, 1783

Quote 1106 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1106 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1106 Amidst the general Joy on the happy and honourable Termination of the War we beg Leave to welcome your Excellency’s return to this City with Hearts Full of Gratitude and Affection.

William Paca: letter to George Washington, December 20, 1783

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