Samuel Adams - (1722 - 1803)

Samuel Adams Signature

Quotes by Samuel Adams

Quote 172 details Share on Google+ - Quote 172 Linked In Share Button - Quote 172 If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or your arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen.

Samuel Adams: Unknown

Quote 553 details Share on Google+ - Quote 553 Linked In Share Button - Quote 553 If ever the Time should come, when vain & aspiring Men shall possess the highest Seats in Government, our Country will stand in Need of its experienced Patriots to prevent its Ruin

Samuel Adams: Letter to James Warren, October 24, 1780

Quote 1438 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1438 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1438 Every natural right not expressly given up, or, from the nature of a social compact, necessarily ceded, remains.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists - Nov 20, 1772
Web Source: https://history.hanover.edu/texts/adamss.html

Quote 1442 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1442 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1442 First, The first fundamental, positive law of all common wealths or states is the establishing the legislative power. As the first fundamental natural law, also, which is to govern even the legislative power itself, is the preservation of the society.

Secondly, The Legislative has no right to absolute, arbitrary power over the lives and fortunes of the people; nor can mortals assume a prerogative not only too high for men, but for angels, and therefore reserved for the exercise of the Deity alone.

...

Thirdly, The supreme power cannot justly take from any man any part of his property, without his consent in person or by his representative.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists - Nov 20, 1772

Quote 1443 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1443 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1443 The Colonists have been branded with the odious names of traitors and rebels only for complaining of their grievances.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists - Nov 20, 1772

Quote 1439 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1439 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1439 All positive and civil laws should conform, as far as possible, to the law of natural reason and equity.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists - Nov 20, 1772

Quote 1440 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1440 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1440 The natural liberty of man, by entering into society, is abridged or restrained, so far only as is necessary for the great end of society, the best good of the whole.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists - Nov 20, 1772

Quote 1441 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1441 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1441 The absolute rights of Englishmen and all freemen, in or out of civil society, are principally personal security, personal liberty, and private property.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists - Nov 20, 1772

Quote 538 details Share on Google+ - Quote 538 Linked In Share Button - Quote 538 How strangely will the Tools of a Tyrant pervert the plain Meaning of Words!

Samuel Adams: Letter to John Pitts, January 21, 1776

Quote 51 details Share on Google+ - Quote 51 Linked In Share Button - Quote 51
If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude than the animated contest of freedom, go from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains sit lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that you were our countrymen!


Quote 560 details Share on Google+ - Quote 560 Linked In Share Button - Quote 560 And that the said Constitution be never construed to authorize Congress to infringe the just liberty of the press, or the rights of conscience; or to prevent the people of the United States, who are peaceable citizens, from keeping their own arms; or to raise standing armies, unless necessary for the defense of the United States, or of some one or more of them; or to prevent the people from petitioning, in a peaceable and orderly manner, the federal legislature, for a redress of grievances; or to subject the people to unreasonable searches and seizures of their persons, papers or possessions.

Samuel Adams: Debates of the Massachusetts Convention of 1788, 1788

Quote 546 details Share on Google+ - Quote 546 Linked In Share Button - Quote 546 Courage, then, my countrymen, our contest is not only whether we ourselves shall be free, but whether there shall be left to mankind an asylum on earth for civil and religious liberty.

Samuel Adams: Speech at the State House, Philadelphia, August 1, 1776

Quote 1053 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1053 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1053
The country shall be independent, and we will be satisfied with nothing sort of it.

Samuel Adams: remark in "small confidential companies"
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 1110 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1110 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1110 While the people are virtuous they cannot be subdued; but when once they lose their virtue, they will be ready to surrender their liberties to the first external or internal invader.

Samuel Adams: letter to James Warren in 1779
For God and Country (T.K. Marion)

Quote 559 details Share on Google+ - Quote 559 Linked In Share Button - Quote 559 Let each citizen remember at the moment he is offering his vote that he is not making a present or a compliment to please an individual - or at least that he ought not so to do; but that he is executing one of the most solemn trusts in human society for which he is accountable to God and his country.

Samuel Adams: Essay in the Boston Gazette, April 16, 1781

Quote 531 details Share on Google+ - Quote 531 Linked In Share Button - Quote 531 It is the greatest absurdity to suppose it in the power of one, or any number of men, at the entering into society, to renounce their essential natural rights, or the means of preserving those rights; when the grand end of civil government, from the very nature of its institution, is for the support, protection, and defence of those very rights; the principal of which, as is before observed, are Life, Liberty, and Property. If men, through fear, fraud, or mistake, should in terms renounce or give up any essential natural right, the eternal law of reason and the grand end of society would absolutely vacate such renunciation. The right to freedom being the gift of God Almighty, it is not in the power of man to alienate this gift and voluntarily become a slave.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists, November 20, 1772

Quote 563 details Share on Google+ - Quote 563 Linked In Share Button - Quote 563 Let Divines, and Philosophers, Statesmen and Patriots unite their endeavours to renovate the Age, by impressing the Minds of Men with the importance of educating their little boys, and girls - of inculcating in the Minds of youth the fear, and Love of the Deity, and universal Phylanthropy; and in subordination to these great principles, the Love of their Country - of instructing them in the Art of self government, without which they never can act a wise part in the Government of Societys great, or small - in short of leading them in the Study, and Practice of the exalted Virtues of the Christian system, which will happily tend to subdue the turbulent passions of Men, and introduce that Golden Age beautifully described in figurative language; when the Wolf shall dwell with the Lamb, and the Leopard lie down with the Kid - the Cow, and the bear shall feed; their young ones shall lie down together, and the Lyon shall eat straw like the Ox - none shall then hurt, or destroy; for the Earth shall be full of the Knowledge of the Lord.

Samuel Adams: Letter to John Adams, October 4, 1790

Quote 691 details Share on Google+ - Quote 691 Linked In Share Button - Quote 691 For true patriots to be silent, is dangerous.

Quote 565 details Share on Google+ - Quote 565 Linked In Share Button - Quote 565 Before the formation of this Constitution, it had been affirmed as a self evident truth, in the declaration of Independence, very deliberately made by the Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled that, "all men are created equal, and are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights." This declaration of Independence was received and ratified by all the States in the Union, and has never been disannulled. May we not from hence conclude, that the doctrine of Liberty and Equality is an article in the political creed of the United States.

Samuel Adams: Address to the Legislature of Massachusetts, January 17, 1794

Quote 572 details Share on Google+ - Quote 572 Linked In Share Button - Quote 572 When I heard, that you had turned your mind to a defence of infidelity, I felt myself much astonished, and more grieved, that you had attempted a measure so injurious to the feelings, and so repugnant to the true interest of so great a part of the citizens of the United Stares. The people of New-England, if you will allow me to use a Scripture phrase, are fast returning to their first love. will you excite among them the spirit of angry controversy, at a time, when they are hastening to unity and peace? I am told that some of our news-papers have announced your intention to publish an additional pamphlet upon the principles of your Age of Reason. Do you think, that your pen, or the pen of any other man can unchristianize the mass of our citizens, or have you hopes of converting a few of them to assist you in so bad a cause?

Samuel Adams: Letter to Thomas Paine, rebuking his "The Age of Reason," November 30, 1802
Quoted Document: Age of Reason - Thomas Paine

Quote 566 details Share on Google+ - Quote 566 Linked In Share Button - Quote 566 It has been observed, that "education has a greater influence on manners, than human laws can have." Human laws excite fears and apprehensions, least crimes committed may be detected and punished: But a virtuous education is calculated to reach and influence the heart, and to prevent crimes. A very judicious writer, has quoted Plato, who in shewing what care for the security of States ought to be taken of the education of youth, speaks of it as almost sufficient to supply the place both of Legislation and Administration. Such an education, which leads the youth beyond mere outside shew, will impress their minds with a profound reverence of the Deity, universal benevolence, and a warm attachment and affection towards their country. It will excite in them a just regard to Divine Revelation, which informs them of the original character and dignity of Man; and it will inspire them with a sense of true honor, which consists in conforming as much as possible, their principles, habits, and manners to that original character. It will enlarge their powers of mind, and prompt them impartially to search for truth in the consideration of every subject that may employ their thoughts; and among other branches of knowledge, it will instruct them in the skill of political architecture and jurisprudence; and qualify them to discover any error, if there should be such, in the forms and administration of Governments, and point out the method of correcting them.

Samuel Adams: Address to Massachusetts Legislature as Governor, January 17, 1794

Quote 524 details Share on Google+ - Quote 524 Linked In Share Button - Quote 524 If you, or Colonel Dalrymple under you, have the power to remove one regiment you have the power to remove both. It is at your peril if you refuse. The meeting is composed of three thousand people. They have become impatient. A thousand men are already arrived from the neighborhood, and the whole country is in motion. Night is approaching. An immediate answer is expected. Both regiments or none!

Samuel Adams: Address to Acting Governor Thomas Hutchinson, the day after the Boston Massacre, March 6, 1770

Quote 564 details Share on Google+ - Quote 564 Linked In Share Button - Quote 564 In the supposed state of nature, all men are equally bound by the laws of nature, or to speak more properly, the laws of the Creator. They are imprinted by the finger of God on the heart of man. Thou shall do no injury to thy neighbor, is the voice of nature and reason, and it is confirmed by written revelation.

Samuel Adams: Having just risen from Lieutenant Governor when Governor John Hancock died, 1794

Quote 537 details Share on Google+ - Quote 537 Linked In Share Button - Quote 537 No people will tamely surrender their Liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when knowledge is diffused and Virtue is preserved. On the Contrary, when People are universally ignorant, and debauched in their Manners, they will sink under their own weight without the Aid of foreign Invaders.

Samuel Adams: Letter to James Warren, November 4, 1775

Quote 643 details Share on Google+ - Quote 643 Linked In Share Button - Quote 643 I thank God that I have lived to see my country independent and free. She may long enjoy her independence and freedom if she will. It depends on her virtue.

Samuel Adams: Unknown


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