Benjamin Franklin - ( 1706 - 1790)

Benjamin Franklin Signature

Quotes by Benjamin Franklin

Quote 36 details Share on Google+ - Quote 36 Linked In Share Button - Quote 36
I am for doing good to the poor, but I differ in opinion of the means. I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. In my youth I traveled much, and I observed in different countries, that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.

Benjamin Franklin: On the Price of Corn and Management of the Poor, November 1766

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Histories of Lives are seldom entertaining, unless they contain something either admirable or exemplar.

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Those that feel can best judge.

Quote 1319 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1319 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1319 Q. What do you think is the reason that the people of America increase faster than in England?

-- Because they marry younger, and more generally.

Benjamin Franklin: Examination of Dr. Benjamin Franklin in the House of Commons - 1766

Quote 1320 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1320 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1320 Q. On what do you found your opinion, that the people in America made any such distinction?

-- I know that whenever the subject has occurred in conversation where I have been present, it has appeared to be the opinion of every one, that we could not be taxed in a parliament where we were not represented. But the payment of duties laid by act of parliament, as regulations of commerce, was never disputed.

Benjamin Franklin: Examination of Dr. Benjamin Franklin in the House of Commons - 1766

Quote 1321 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1321 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1321 I think the difference is very great. An external tax is a duty laid on commodities imported; that duty is added to the first cost, and other charges on the commodity, and when it is offered to sale, makes a part of the price. If the people do not like it at that price, they refuse it; they are not obliged to pay it. But an internal tax is forced from the people without their consent, if not laid by their own representatives. The Stamp Act says, we shall have no commerce, make no exchange of property with each other, neither purchase nor grant, nor recover debts; we shall neither marry nor make our wills, unless we pay such sums, and thus it is intended to extort our money from us, or ruin us by the consequences of refusing to pay for it.

Benjamin Franklin: Examination of Dr. Benjamin Franklin in the House of Commons - 1766

Quote 174 details Share on Google+ - Quote 174 Linked In Share Button - Quote 174 Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God

Benjamin Franklin: Pennsylvania Evening Post (14 Dec. 1775)
For God and Country (T.K. Marion)

Quote 1317 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1317 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1317 To instruct, to advise, to qualify those, who have been restored to freedom, for the exercise and enjoyment of civil liberty, to promote in them habits of industry, to furnish them with employments suited to their age, sex, talents, and other circumstances, and to procure their children an education calculated for their future situation in life; these are the great outlines of the annexed plan, which we have adopted, and which we conceive will essentially promote the public good, and the happiness of these our hitherto too much neglected fellow-creatures.

Benjamin Franklin: Address to the public - 1789
Quoted Document: An Address to the Public (Concerning Slavery)

Quote 1316 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1316 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1316 Attention to emancipated black people, it is therefore to be hoped, will become a branch of our national police; but, as far as we contribute to promote this emancipation, so far that attention is evidently a serious duty incumbent on us, and which we mean to discharge to the best of our judgment and abilities.

Benjamin Franklin: Address to the public - 1789
Quoted Document: An Address to the Public (Concerning Slavery)

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I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth - that god governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without his notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without his aid?


Quote 1175 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1175 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1175 Sin is not hurtful because it is forbidden but it is forbidden because it is hurtful.

Quote 1314 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1314 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1314 Slavery is such an atrocious debasement of human nature, that its very extirpation, if not performed with solicitous care, may sometimes open a source of serious evils

Benjamin Franklin: Address to the public - 1789
Quoted Document: An Address to the Public (Concerning Slavery)

Quote 39 details Share on Google+ - Quote 39 Linked In Share Button - Quote 39 Men and melons are hard to know.

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History affords us many instances of the ruin of states, by the prosecution of measures ill suited to the temper and genius of their people. The ordaining of laws in favor of one part of the nation, to the prejudice and oppression of another, is certainly the most erroneous and mistaken policy. An equal dispensation of protection, rights, privileges, and advantages, is what every part is entitled to, and ought to enjoy... These measures never fail to create great and violent jealousies and animosities between the people favored and the people oppressed; whence a total separation of affections, interests, political obligations, and all manner of connections, by which the whole state is weakened.

Benjamin Franklin: Emblematical Representations, Circa 1774

Quote 1315 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1315 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1315 The unhappy man, who has long been treated as a brute animal, too frequently sinks beneath the common standard of the human species. The galling chains, that bind his body, do also fetter his intellectual faculties, and impair the social affections of his heart. Accustomed to move like a mere machine, by the will of a master, reflection is suspended; he has not the power of choice; and reason and conscience have but little influence over his conduct, because he is chiefly governed by the passion of fear. He is poor and friendless—perhaps worn out by extreme labour, age, and disease.

Benjamin Franklin: Address to the public - 1789
Quoted Document: An Address to the Public (Concerning Slavery)

Quote 1350 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1350 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1350 Would you live with ease, do what you ought, not what you please.

Quote 38 details Share on Google+ - Quote 38 Linked In Share Button - Quote 38 Marriage is...the most natural state of man, and therefore the state in which you are most likely to find solid happiness.... It is the man and woman united that makes the complete human being..... man has not nearly the value he would have in the state of union. He is an incomplete animal; he resembles the odd half of a pair of scissors.

Benjamin Franklin: "Advice on the Choice of a Mistress" ( 25 Jun 1745

Quote 269 details Share on Google+ - Quote 269 Linked In Share Button - Quote 269 There are two Passions which have a powerful Influence in the Affairs of Men. These are Ambition and Avarice; the Love of Power, and the Love of Money. Separately each of these has great Force in prompting Men to Action; but when united in View of the same Object, they have in many Minds the most violent Effect. Place before the Eyes of such Men a [Post] of Honor that shall at the same time be a Place of Profit, and they will move Heaven and Earth to obtain it.

Benjamin Franklin: Convention Speech on Salaries (unpublished) June 2, 1787

Quote 732 details Share on Google+ - Quote 732 Linked In Share Button - Quote 732 Ignorance leads Men into a Party, and Shame keeps them from getting out again.

Quote 918 details Share on Google+ - Quote 918 Linked In Share Button - Quote 918 God grant, that not only the Love of Liberty, but a thorough Knowledge of the Rights of Man, may pervade all the Nations of the Earth, so that a Philosopher may set his Foot anywhere on its Surface, and say, "This is my Country."


Quote 272 details Share on Google+ - Quote 272 Linked In Share Button - Quote 272 When a broad table is to be made and the edges of planks do not fit the artist takes a little from both and makes a good joint. In like manner here, both sides must part with some of their demands in order that they may join in some accommodating proposition.

Benjamin Franklin: Convention debate (30 June 1787)

Quote 985 details Share on Google+ - Quote 985 Linked In Share Button - Quote 985
That it is better 100 guilty Persons should escape than that one innocent Person should suffer, is a Maxim that has been long and generally approved.

Quote 33 details Share on Google+ - Quote 33 Linked In Share Button - Quote 33 Here comes the orator! With his flood of words, and his drop of reason.

Quote 1428 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1428 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1428 On education all our lives depend / And few to that, too few, with care attend.

Quote 1042 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1042 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1042
My rule, in which I have always found satisfaction, is, never to turn aside in public affairs through views of private interest; but to go straight forward in doing what appears to me right at the time, leaving the consequences with Providence.



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