Benjamin Rush - (1745 - 1813)

Benjamin Rush Signature

Quotes by Benjamin Rush

Quote 822 details Share on Google+ - Quote 822 Linked In Share Button - Quote 822
It is Favorable to liberty. Freedom can exist only in the society of knowledge. Without learning, men are incapable of knowing their rights, and where learning is confined to a few people, liberty can be neither equal nor universal.

Benjamin Rush: Essay, 1786

Quote 806 details Share on Google+ - Quote 806 Linked In Share Button - Quote 806 Tis done. We have become a nation.

Benjamin Rush: To Elias Boudinot, referring to the ratification of the Constitution - July 9, 1788

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The only foundation for a useful education in a republic is to be laid in religion. Without this there can be no virtue, and without virtue there can be no liberty, and liberty is the object and life of all republican governments.

Benjamin Rush: On the Mode of Education Proper in a Republic 1806
For God and Country (T.K. Marion)

Quote 1420 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1420 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1420 The new government will demolish our Balloon Constitution. If it had no other merit, this would be enough with me. But it has a thousand other things to recommend it. It makes us a Nation. It rescues us from anarchy and Slavery. It revives agriculture and commerce. It checks moral and political iniquity. In a word, it makes a man both willing to live and to die. To live, because it opens to him fair prospects of great public and private happiness. To die, because it ensures peace, order, safety and prosperity to his children.


Quote 584 details Share on Google+ - Quote 584 Linked In Share Button - Quote 584 By removing the Bible from schools we would be wasting so much time and money in punishing criminals and so little pains to prevent crime. Take the Bible out of our schools and there would be an explosion in crime.

Benjamin Rush: Unknown

Quote 585 details Share on Google+ - Quote 585 Linked In Share Button - Quote 585 I have alternately been called an Aristocrat and a Democrat. I am neither. I am a Christocrat.

Benjamin Rush: Unknown

Quote 1429 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1429 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1429 Let our common people be compelled by law to give their children a good English education. Lett schoolmasters of every description be supported in part by the public, and let their principles and morals be subjected to examination before we employ them. ... This plan of general education alone will render American Revolution a blessing to mankind.

Benjamin Rush: to Richard Price, May 25, 1786
The Quotable Founding Fathers

Quote 807 details Share on Google+ - Quote 807 Linked In Share Button - Quote 807 The 4th of July has been celebrate din Philadelphia in the manner I expected. The military men, and particularly one of them, ran away with all the glory of the day. Scarcely a word was said of the solicitude and labors and fears and sorrows and sleepless nights of the men who projected, proposed, defended and subscribed the Declaration of Independence. Do you recollect your memorable speech upon the day on which the vote was taken? Do you recollect the pensive and awful silence which pervaded the house when we were called up, one after another, to the table of the president of Congress to subscribe what was believed by many at the time to be our own death warrants? The silence and the gloom of the morning were interrupted, I well recollect, only for a moment by Colonel Harrison of Virginia, who said to Mr. Gerry at the table: I shall have a great advantage over you, Mr. Gerry, when we are all hung for what we are now doing. From the size and weight of my body I shall die in a few minutes, but from the lightness of your body you will dance in the air an hour or two before you are dead. This speech procured a transient smile, but it was soon succeeded by the solemnity with which the whole business was conducted.

Benjamin Rush: Letter to John Adams, July 20, 1811

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This day I attended the funeral of Wm. Grays wife, a black woman, with about 50 more white persons and two Episcopal clergymen. The white attendants were cheifly the nieghbours of the deceased. The sight was a new one in Philadelphia, for hitherto (a few cases excepted) the Negroes alone attended each others funerals. By this event it is to be hoped the partition wall which divided the Blacks from the Whites will be still further broken down and a way prepared for their union as brethren and members of one great family.

Benjamin Rush: Commonplace Book 1793

Quote 1431 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1431 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1431 The blessings of knowledge can be extended to the poor and laboring part of the community only by means of free schools. ... To a people enlightened in the principles of liberty and Christianity , arguments, it is to be hoped, will be unnecessary to persuade them to adopt these necessary and useful institutions.

Benjamin Rush: to The Citizens of Philadelphia, March 28, 1787
The Quotable Founding Fathers

Quote 839 details Share on Google+ - Quote 839 Linked In Share Button - Quote 839 I grant this mode of secluding boys from the intercourse of private families has a tendency to make them scholars, but our business is to make them men, citizens, and Christians. The vices of young people are generally learned from each other. The vices of adults seldom infect them. By separating them from each other, therefore, in their hours of relaxation from study, we secure their morals from a principal source of corruption, while we improve their manners by subjecting them to those restraints which the difference of age and sex naturally produce in private families.

Benjamin Rush: Unknown

Quote 838 details Share on Google+ - Quote 838 Linked In Share Button - Quote 838 Patriotism is as much a virtue as justice, and is as necessary for the support of societies as natural affection is for the support of families.

Benjamin Rush: Letter dated October 20, 1773

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Such is my veneration for every religion that reveals the attributes of the Deity, or a future state of rewards and punishments, that I had rather see the opinions of Confucius or Mahomed inculcated upon our youth than see them grow up wholly devoid of a system of religious principles.

Benjamin Rush: Of the Mode of Education Proper in the Republic - 1806

Quote 831 details Share on Google+ - Quote 831 Linked In Share Button - Quote 831 Ye men of sense and virtue - Ye advocates for American Liberty, rouse up and espouse the cause of humanity and general liberty. Bear a testimony against a vice which degrades human nature, and dissolves that universal tie of benevolence which should connect all children of men together in one great family - The plant of liberty is of so tender a nature, that it cannot thrive long in the neighborhood of slavery.

Benjamin Rush: On Slavekeeping 1773

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It would have been a truth, if Mr. Locke had not said it, that where there is no law, there can be no liberty, and nothing deserves the name of law but that which is certain, and universal in its operations upon all the members of the community.

Benjamin Rush: To David Ramsay 1788

Quote 837 details Share on Google+ - Quote 837 Linked In Share Button - Quote 837 The American war is over; but this far from being the case with the American revolution. On the contrary, nothing but the first act of the drama is closed. It remains yet to establish and perfect our new forms of government, and to prepare the principles, morals, and manners of our citizens for these forms of government after they are established and brought to perfection.

Benjamin Rush: January 25, 1787

Quote 825 details Share on Google+ - Quote 825 Linked In Share Button - Quote 825 To look up to a government that establishes justice, insures order, cherishes virtue, secures property, and protects from every species of violence, affords a pleasure, that can only be exceeded by looking up in all circumstances to an overruling providence. Such a pleasure I hope is before us, and our posterity under the influence of the new government.

Benjamin Rush: To David Ramsay, 1788

Quote 804 details Share on Google+ - Quote 804 Linked In Share Button - Quote 804 I consider you [John Adams] and him [Thomas Jefferson] as the North and South Poles of the American Revolution. Some talked, some wrote, and some fought to promote and establish it, but you and M.r Jefferson thought for us all. I have never taken a retrospect of the years 1775 and 1776 without associating your opinions and speeches and conversations with all the great political, moral, and intellectual achievements of Congresses of those memorable years.

Benjamin Rush: Letter to John Adams - February 17, 1812

Quote 824 details Share on Google+ - Quote 824 Linked In Share Button - Quote 824 Political freedom includes in it every other blessing. All the pleasures of riches, science, virtue, and religion itself derive their value from liberty alone. No wonder therefore wise and prudent legislators have in all ages been held in such great veneration; and no wonder too those illustrious souls who have employed their pens and sacrificed their lives in defense of liberty have met with such universal applause. Their reputations, like some majestic river which enlarges and widens as it approaches its parent ocean, shall become greater and greater through every age and outlive the ruins of the world itself.

Benjamin Rush: To Catharine Macaulay - January 18, 1769

Quote 805 details Share on Google+ - Quote 805 Linked In Share Button - Quote 805 Most of the distresses of our country, and of the mistakes which Europeans have formed of us, have arisen from the mistaken belief that the American Revolution is over. This is so far from being the case that we have only finished the first act of the great drama. We have changed our forms of government, but it remains yet to effect a revolution in our principles, opinions, and manners so as to accommodate them to the forms of government we have adopted.

Benjamin Rush: Letter to Richard Price, May 25, 1786

Quote 827 details Share on Google+ - Quote 827 Linked In Share Button - Quote 827 The powers of the human mind appear to be arranged in a certain order like the strata of earth. They are thrown out of their order by the fall of man. The moral powers appear to have occupied the higher and first place. They recover it in solitude, and after sleep, hence the advantage of solitary punishments, and of consulting our morning pillow in cases where there is a doubt of what is right, our duty. The first thoughts in the morning if followed seldom deceive or mislead us. They are generally seasoned by the moral powers.

Benjamin Rush: Commonplace Book 1790

Quote 803 details Share on Google+ - Quote 803 Linked In Share Button - Quote 803 This illustrious patriot has not his superior, scarcely his equal for abilities and virtue on the whole of the continent of America

Benjamin Rush: About John Adams - Rush to a friend - September 1776

Quote 829 details Share on Google+ - Quote 829 Linked In Share Button - Quote 829 Without religion, I believe that learning does real mischief to the morals and principles of mankind.

Benjamin Rush: To John Armstrong, March 19, 1783

Quote 1174 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1174 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1174 My Observations upon the misery which a single legislature has produced in Pennsylvania, have only served to encrease my Abhorance of that Species of Government. I could as soon embrace the most absurd dogmas in the most Absurd of all the pagan religions, as prostitute my Understanding by approving of our State constitution—It is below a democracy. It is mobocracy—if you will allow me to coin a word.



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