Roger Sherman - (1721 - 1793)

Quotes by Roger Sherman

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The only real security that you can have for all your important rights must be in the nature of your government. If you suffer any man to govern you who is not strongly interested in supporting your privileges, you will certainly lose them.

Roger Sherman: November 22, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 900 details Share on Google+ - Quote 900 Linked In Share Button - Quote 900 On examining the new proposed constitution, there can be no question but that there is authority enough lodged in the proposed Federal Congress, if abused, to do the greatest injury. And it is perfectly idle to object to it, that there is no bill of rights, or to propose to add to it a provision that a trial by jury shall in no case be omitted, or to patch it up by adding a stipulation in favor of the press, or to guard it by removing the paltry objection to the right of Congress to regulate the time and manner of elections.

Roger Sherman: November 22, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 1219 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1219 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1219 If the president alone was vested with the power of appointing all officers, and was left to select a council for himself, he would be liable to be deceived by flatterers and pretenders to patriotism, who would have no motive but their own emolument. They would wish to extend the powers of the executive to increase their own importance; and, however upright he might be in his intentions, there would be great danger of his being misled, even to the subversion of the constitution, or, at least, to introduce such evils as to interrupt the harmony of the government, and deprive him of the confidence of the people.

Roger Sherman: letter to John Adams, July 1789

Quote 1212 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1212 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1212 Of a very different nature, tho' only one degree better than the other reasoning, is all that sublimity of nonsense and alarm, that has been thundered against it in every shape of metaphoric terror, on the subject of a bill of rights, the liberty of the press, rights of conscience, rights of taxation and election, trials in the vicinity, freedom of speech, trial by jury, and a standing army. These last are undoubtedly important points, much too important to depend on mere paper protection. For, guard such privileges by the strongest expressions, still if you leave the legislative and executive power in the hands of those who are or may be disposed to deprive you of them you are but slaves.

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Nov 22, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

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It is fortunate that you have been but little distressed with that torrent of impertinence and folly, with which the newspaper politicians have over whelmed many parts of our country.

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Nov 22, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 1214 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1214 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1214 The same thing once more I am a plain man, of few words; for this reason perhaps it is, that when I have said a thing I love to repeat it.

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Nov 29, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 1217 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1217 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1217 I had in mine, of the same date, communicated to you my ideas on that part of the constitution, limiting the president's power of negativing the acts of the legislature; and just hinted some thoughts on the propriety of the provision made for the appointment to offices, which I esteem to be a power nearly as important as legislation.


Quote 1216 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1216 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1216 Can you then apprehend danger of oppression and tyranny from the too great duration of the power of your rulers?

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Dec 20, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 1208 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1208 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1208 Is it not certain that government would be weak and irregular, and that the people would be poor and contemptible? And still it must be allowed, that each town would entirely surrender its boasted independence if they should unite in State government, and would retain only about one-eightieth part of the administration of their own affairs.

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Nov 14, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

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It is true that many people who are great men because they go to Hartford to make laws for us once or twice in a year, would then be no greater than their neighbors, as much fewer representatives would be chosen.

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Nov 14, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 1215 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1215 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1215 But your freedom, in that sense of the expression (if it could be called sense), is already totally gone. Your Legislature is not only supreme in the usual sense of the word, but they have literally, all the powers of society. Can you can you possibly grant anything new? Have you any power which is not already granted to your General Assembly? You are indeed called on to say whether a part of the powers now exercised by the General Assembly, shall not, in future, be exercised by Congress. And it is clearly much better for your interest, that Congress should experience those powers than that they should continue in the General Assembly, provided you can trust Congress as safely as the General Assembly.

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Nov 29, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 1207 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1207 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1207 Thus people are justly cautious how they exchange present advantages for the hope of others in a system not yet experienced.

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Nov 14, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 1218 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1218 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1218 It appears to me the senate is the most important branch in the government, for aiding and supporting the executive, securing the rights of the individual states, the government of the United States, and the liberties of the people. The executive magistrate is to execute the laws. The senate, being a branch of the legislature, will naturally incline to have them duly executed, and, therefore, will advise to such appointments as will best attain that end.

Roger Sherman: letter to John Adams, July 1789

Quote 1211 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1211 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1211 It is enough that you should have heard, that one party has seriously urged, that we should adopt the New Constitution because it has been approved by Washington and Franklin: and the other, with all the solemnity of apostolic address to Men, Brethren, Fathers, Friends and Countryman, have urged that we should reject, as dangerous, every clause thereof, because that Washington is more used to command as a soldier, than to reason as a politician Franklin is old, others are young and Wilson is haughty. You are too well informed to decide by the opinion of others, and too independent to need a caution against undue influence.

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Nov 22, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 1206 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1206 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1206 I believe that there is one only living and tru God, existing in three persons, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, the same in substance, equal in power and glory. That the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are a revelation from God, and a complete rule to direct us how we may glorify and enjoy Him.



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