Alexander Hamilton - (1755 - 1804)

Alexander Hamilton Signature

Quotes by Alexander Hamilton

Quote 147 details Share on Google+ - Quote 147 Linked In Share Button - Quote 147 If mankind were to resolve to agree in no institution of government, until every part of it had been adjusted to the most exact standard of perfection, society would soon become a general scene of anarchy, and the world a desert.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 65, March 7, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 216 details Share on Google+ - Quote 216 Linked In Share Button - Quote 216 There is nothing absurd or impracticable in the idea of a league or alliance between independent nations for certain defined purposes precisely stated in a treaty regulating all the details of time, place, circumstance, and quantity; leaving nothing to future discretion; and depending for its execution on the good faith of the parties.

Quote 1051 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1051 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1051
Adieu, best of wives and best of Women. Embrace all my darling Children for me.

Alexander Hamilton: letter to Eliza Hamilton - letter written to his wife before the duel with Aaron Burr
Letters of a Nation

Quote 212 details Share on Google+ - Quote 212 Linked In Share Button - Quote 212 The truth is, after all the declamations we have heard, that the Constitution is itself, in every rational sense, and to every useful purpose, A BILL OF RIGHTS.


Quote 1030 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1030 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1030
A garden, you know, is a very usual refuge of a disappointed politician. Accordingly, I have purchased a few acres about nine miles from town, have built a house, and am cultivating a garden.

Alexander Hamilton: letter to Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, December 29, 1802
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 133 details Share on Google+ - Quote 133 Linked In Share Button - Quote 133
Here sir, the people govern; here they act by their immediate representatives.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 17, 1788
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 219 details Share on Google+ - Quote 219 Linked In Share Button - Quote 219 This process of election affords a moral certainty that the office of President will seldom fall to the lot of any many who is not in an eminent degree endowed with the requisite qualifications.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 68, March 14, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 204 details Share on Google+ - Quote 204 Linked In Share Button - Quote 204 The regular distribution of power into distinct departments; the introduction of legislative balances and checks; the institution of courts composed of judges holding their offices during good behavior; the representation of the people in the legislature by deputies of their own election... They are means, and powerful means, by which the excellences of republican government may be retained and its imperfections lessened or avoided.


Quote 148 details Share on Google+ - Quote 148 Linked In Share Button - Quote 148 If the federal government should overpass the just bounds of its authority and make a tyrannical use of its powers, the people, whose creature it is, must appeal to the standard they have formed, and take such measures to redress the injury done to the Constitution as the exigency may suggest and prudence justify.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 33, January 3, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 144 details Share on Google+ - Quote 144 Linked In Share Button - Quote 144 If a well-regulated militia be the most natural defense of a free country, it ought certainly to be under the regulation and at the disposal of that body which is constituted the guardian of the national security. If standing armies are dangerous to liberty, an efficacious power over the militia in the same body ought, as far as possible, to take away the inducement and the pretext to such unfriendly institutions. If the federal government can command the aid of the militia in those emergencies which call for the military arm in support of the civil magistrate, it can the better dispense with the employment of a different kind of force. If it cannot avail itself of the former, it will be obliged to recur to the latter. To render an army unnecessary will be a more certain method of preventing its existence than a thousand prohibitions upon paper.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 29, January 10, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 977 details Share on Google+ - Quote 977 Linked In Share Button - Quote 977
The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for among old parchments or musty records. They are written, as with a sunbeam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the hand of the divinity itself; and can never be erased or obscured by mortal power.


Quote 180 details Share on Google+ - Quote 180 Linked In Share Button - Quote 180 No government, any more than an individual, will long be respected without being truly respectable; nor be truly respectable, without possessing a certain portion of order and stability.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 62, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 234 details Share on Google+ - Quote 234 Linked In Share Button - Quote 234 [The Judicial Branch] may truly be said to have neither FORCE nor WILL, but merely judgment; and must ultimately depend upon the aid of the executive arm even for the efficacy of its judgments.

Quote 187 details Share on Google+ - Quote 187 Linked In Share Button - Quote 187 The circumstances that endanger the safety of nations are infinite, and for this reason no constitutional shackles can wisely be imposed on the power to which the care of it is committed.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 23, December 17, 1787
The Federalist Papers

Quote 202 details Share on Google+ - Quote 202 Linked In Share Button - Quote 202 The propriety of a law, in a constitutional light, must always be determined by the nature of the powers upon which it is founded.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 33, January 3, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 173 details Share on Google+ - Quote 173 Linked In Share Button - Quote 173 The best we can hope for concerning the people at large is that they be properly armed.

Alexander Hamilton: The Federalist Papers
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 119 details Share on Google+ - Quote 119 Linked In Share Button - Quote 119 A feeble executive implies a feeble execution of the government. A feeble execution is but another phrase for a bad execution; and a government ill executed, whatever may be its theory, must be, in practice, a bad government.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 70, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 198 details Share on Google+ - Quote 198 Linked In Share Button - Quote 198 The Judiciary...has no influence over either the sword or the purse; no direction either of the strength or of the wealth of the society, and can take no active resolution whatever. It may truly be said to have neither force nor will.


Quote 201 details Share on Google+ - Quote 201 Linked In Share Button - Quote 201 The proposed Constitution, so far from implying an abolition of the State governments, makes them constituent parts of the national sovereignty, by allowing them a direct representation in the Senate, and leaves in their possession certain exclusive and very important portions of sovereign power. This fully corresponds, in every rational import of the terms, with the idea of a federal government.


Quote 217 details Share on Google+ - Quote 217 Linked In Share Button - Quote 217 There is something so far-fetched and so extravagant in the idea of danger to liberty from the militia that one is at a loss whether to treat it with gravity or with raillery; whether to consider it as a mere trial of skill, like the paradoxes of rhetoricians; as a disingenuous artifice to instill prejudices at any price; or as the serious.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 29, January 10, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 215 details Share on Google+ - Quote 215 Linked In Share Button - Quote 215 There is no part of the administration of government that requires extensive information and a thorough knowledge of the principles of political economy, so much as the business of taxation. The man who understands those principles best will be least likely to resort to oppressive expedients, or sacrifice any particular class of citizens to the procurement of revenue. It might be demonstrated that the most productive system of finance will always be the least burdensome.


Quote 183 details Share on Google+ - Quote 183 Linked In Share Button - Quote 183 Of those men who have overturned the liberties of republics, the greatest number have begun their career by paying an obsequious court to the people, commencing demagogues and ending tyrants

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 1, October 27, 1787
The Federalist Papers

Quote 223 details Share on Google+ - Quote 223 Linked In Share Button - Quote 223 To model our political system upon speculations of lasting tranquility, is to calculate on the weaker springs of the human character.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 34, January 4, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 883 details Share on Google+ - Quote 883 Linked In Share Button - Quote 883 Our hopes are not placed in any particular city or spot of ground, but in preserving a good army, furnished with proper necessaries, to take advantage of favorable opportunities, and waste and defeat the enemy by piecemeal.

Alexander Hamilton: letter to Hugh Knox, 1777

Quote 184 details Share on Google+ - Quote 184 Linked In Share Button - Quote 184 Responsibility, in order to be reasonable, must be limited to objects within the power of the responsible party, and in order to be effectual, must relate to operations of that power, of which a ready and proper judgment can be formed by the constituents.



 Next 25 >>

Showing results 1 to 25 of 116



Discussion