Thomas Paine - (1737 - 1809)

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Quotes by Thomas Paine

Quote 1199 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1199 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1199
To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead.

Thomas Paine: The Crisis No. V - The American Crisis (1776 - 1783)
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Quoted Document: The Crisis

Quote 1349 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1349 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1349
A thing moderately good is not so good as it ought to be. Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle is always a vice.


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Republican Government is no other than government established and conducted for the interest of the public, as well individually as collectively.


Quote 1390 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1390 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1390 A republic must not only be so in its principles but in its form.

Thomas Paine: "To the Citizens of the United States" 1802
The Quotable Founding Fathers

Quote 409 details Share on Google+ - Quote 409 Linked In Share Button - Quote 409 As parents, we can have no joy, knowing that this government is not sufficiently lasting to ensure any thing which we may bequeath to posterity: And by a plain method of argument, as we are running the next generation into debt, we ought to do the work of it, otherwise we use them meanly and pitifully. In order to discover the line of our duty rightly, we should take our children in our hand, and fix our station a few years farther into life; that eminence will present a prospect, which a few present fears and prejudices conceal from our sight.

Thomas Paine: Common Sense, 1776
Quoted Document: Common Sense - Thomas Paine

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The greatest characters the world have known, have rose on the democratic floor. Aristocracy has not been able to keep a proportionate pace with democracy.

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The rights of minors are as sacred as the rights of the aged.

Thomas Paine: Dissertation of First Principles of Government, 1795
The Quotable Founding Fathers
Quoted Document: Dissertation on first-principles of government

Quote 731 details Share on Google+ - Quote 731 Linked In Share Button - Quote 731 You have too much at stake to hesitate. You ought not to think an hour upon the matter, but to spring to action at once...Now our time and turn is come, and perhaps the finishing stroke is reserved for us. When we look back on the dangers we have been saved from, and reflect on the success we have been blessed with, it would be sinful either to be idle or to despair.

Thomas Paine: The Crisis No. IV, Sept. 12, 1777
Quoted Document: The Crisis

Quote 1393 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1393 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1393 A long series of politics so remarkably distinguished by a succession of misfortunes, without one alleviating turn, must certainly have something in it systematically wrong. It is sufficient to awaken the most credulous into suspicion, and the most obstinate into thought.

Thomas Paine: The Crisis - 1778
The Quotable Founding Fathers
Quoted Document: The Crisis

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The reformation was preceded by the discovery of America, as if the Almighty graciously meant to open a sanctuary to the persecuted in future years, when home should afford neither friendship nor safety.

Thomas Paine: Common Sense, 1776
Quoted Document: Common Sense - Thomas Paine

Quote 1098 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1098 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1098 The right of voting for representatives is the primary right by which other rights are protected. To take away this right is to reduce a man to slavery, for slavery consists in being subject to the will of another, and he that has not a vote in the election of representatives is in this case.

Thomas Paine: Dissertation on First Principles of Government
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 693 details Share on Google+ - Quote 693 Linked In Share Button - Quote 693 He who dares not offend cannot be honest.

Thomas Paine: Unknown

Quote 413 details Share on Google+ - Quote 413 Linked In Share Button - Quote 413 If, from the more wretched parts of the old world, we look at those which are in an advanced stage of improvement, we still find the greedy hand of government thrusting itself into every corner and crevice of industry, and grasping the spoil of the multitude. Invention is continually exercised, to furnish new pretenses for revenues and taxation. It watches prosperity as its prey and permits none to escape without tribute.

Thomas Paine: Rights of Man, 1791
Quoted Document: Rights of Man - Thomas Paine

Quote 1355 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1355 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1355
Silence becomes a kind of crime when it operates as a cover or an encouragement to the guilty.


Quote 1270 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1270 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1270 'Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.

Thomas Paine: The Crisis 1776
The Quotable Founding Fathers
Quoted Document: The Crisis

Quote 1361 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1361 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1361 However men may differ in their ideas of grandeur or of government here, the grave is nevertheless a perfect republic.

Thomas Paine: The Crisis 1778
The Quotable Founding Fathers
Quoted Document: The Crisis

Quote 1113 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1113 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1113 Where, some say, is the king of America? I'll tell you, friend, he reigns above.


Quote 417 details Share on Google+ - Quote 417 Linked In Share Button - Quote 417 Society in every state is a blessing, but government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one; for when we suffer or are exposed to the same miseries by a government, which we might expect in a country without government, our calamity is heightened by reflecting that we furnish the means by which we suffer.

Thomas Paine: Common Sense, 1776
Quoted Document: Common Sense - Thomas Paine

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There is existing in man, a mass of sense lying in a dormant state, and which, unless something excites it to action, will descend with him, in that condition, to the grave.

Thomas Paine: Rights of Man, 1792
Quoted Document: Rights of Man - Thomas Paine

Quote 411 details Share on Google+ - Quote 411 Linked In Share Button - Quote 411 He that would make his own liberty secure, must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty, he establishes a precedent that will reach to himself.

Thomas Paine: Dissertation on First Principles of Government, December 23, 1791
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...
Quoted Document: Dissertation on first-principles of government

Quote 423 details Share on Google+ - Quote 423 Linked In Share Button - Quote 423 Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom, must, like men, undergo the fatigues of supporting it.

Thomas Paine: The American Crisis, No. 4, September 11, 1777
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...
Quoted Document: The Crisis

Quote 1372 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1372 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1372 It is the nature of man to die, and he will continue to die as long as he continues to be born.

Quote 425 details Share on Google+ - Quote 425 Linked In Share Button - Quote 425 We fight not to enslave, but to set a country free, and to make room upon the earth for honest men to live in.

Thomas Paine: The American Crisis, No. 4, September 11, 1777
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...
Quoted Document: The Crisis

Quote 1103 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1103 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1103 [George Washington] And as to you, Sir, treacherous is private friendship (for so you have been to me, and that in the day of danger) and a hypocrite in public life, the world will be puzzled to decide whether you are an apostate or an impostor; whether you have abandoned good principles, or whether you ever had any.

Quote 661 details Share on Google+ - Quote 661 Linked In Share Button - Quote 661 The preservation of a free Government requires not merely, that the metes and bounds which separate each department of power be invariably maintained; but more especially that neither of them be suffered to overleap the great Barrier which defends the rights of the people. The Rulers who are guilty of such an encroachment, exceed the commission from which they derive their authority, and are Tyrants. The People who submit to it are governed by laws made neither by themselves nor by an authority derived from them, and are slaves.

Thomas Paine: 1785 - Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments


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