Site Search for: BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

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FILE: Biography for Benjamin Franklin


Biography for Benjamin Franklin[MORE]

FILE: Autobiography - Benjamin Franklin


The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin is the traditional name for the unfinished record of his own life written by Benjamin Franklin from 1771 to 1790; however, Franklin himself appears to have called the work his Memoirs. Although it had a tortuous publ[MORE]

FILE: An Address to the Public (Concerning Slavery)


An address to the public by Benjamin Franklin made in 1789 about slavery.[MORE]

BOOK: The Real Benjamin Franklin


The Real Benjamin Franklin: The True Story of America's Greatest Diplomat. There are many Benjamin Franklins -- or at least he has taken on many different forms in the history books of the last two centuries. Some historians have shown us an aged statesman whose wise and steadyi[MORE]

BOOK: The Founding Fathers


A completely newly researched story of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, and of the lives of the most prominent framers of the Constitution: Oliver Ellsworth, Benjamin Franklin, Nathaniel Gotham, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, George Mason, Gouverneur Morris, Charles Cot[MORE]

BOOK: The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin


A classic of eighteenth-century American history and literature, Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography has had an influence perhaps unequaled by any other book by an American writer. Written ostensibly as a letter to his son William, Franklin's Autobiography offers his reflections on[MORE]

PEOPLE: John Alleyne


Little is known about John Alleyne: he was the son of Thomas Alleyne of Queen Street, Westminster, was admitted to the Middle Temple in 1767, married Nancy Rosewell of Clapton on May 29, 1768, published The Legal Degrees of Marriage Stated and Considered … (London, 1774), and d[MORE]

PEOPLE: Deborah Franklin


Deborah Read Franklin (about 1708 – December 19, 1774) was the spouse of Benjamin Franklin, a prominent inventor, printer, thinker, revolutionary and Founding Father of the United States. Franklin proposed to Read in 1724 when he was eighteen years old, but her mother would [MORE]

PEOPLE: Jane Mecom


Jane Franklin Mecom (1712–1794) was the youngest sister of Benjamin Franklin. Mecom and Franklin corresponded throughout the course of their lives, and some of their letters survive.[1] Though Mecom never attended school, she learned to read and write under the tutelage of B[MORE]

PEOPLE: Thomas Cushing


Thomas Cushing III (March 24, 1725 – February 28, 1788) was an American lawyer, merchant, and statesman from Boston, Massachusetts. Active in Boston politics, he represented the city in the provincial assembly from 1761 to its dissolution in 1774, serving as the lower house's s[MORE]

VIDEO: Benjamin Franklin Biyography


The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin is the traditional name for the unfinished record of his own life written by Benjamin Franklin from 1771 to 1790; however, Franklin himself appears to have called the work his Memoirs. Although it had a tortuous publication history after Fra[MORE]

VIDEO: Franklin's Spark (1720-1765)


Benjamin Franklin is Philadelphia's most iconic citizen, but how did William Penn's city shape the man often called "The First American"? This episode follows Franklin from his arrival as a fugitive indentured servant to his emergence as a leader of craftsmen, civic innovator, me[MORE]

Quote 864 details Share on Google+ - Quote 864 Linked In Share Button - Quote 864 The answers of Mr. Adams [John Adams] to his addressees from the most grotesque scene in the tragic-comedy acting by the government... he is verifying completely the last feature in the character drawn of him by Dr. F [Benjamin Franklin] however his title may stand to the two first. "Always an honest man, often a wise one, but sometimes wholly out of his senses."

James Madison: to Thomas Jefferson, June 10, 1798

Quote 1076 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1076 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1076 The securing a Country and fixing Boundaries is undoubtedly the grand Scheme of the Indians and to effect this they will use their utmost Endeavours, nor do I think it is possible to secure their Friendship without agreeing to this. They see themselves cooped up between two powerful Nations who are daily encreasing upon them and squeezing them into a narrower Compass; so that unless they now exert themselves they see plainly they will be quickly crushed, or deprived of their Country.

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, May 14, 1758

Quote 1077 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1077 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1077 I am sorry to inform you there is Reason to fear the Indian War is not quite at an End.

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, December 18, 1764

Quote 1082 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1082 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1082 When people are taxed by their own representatives, though the tax is high they pay it chearfully, from a confidence that no more than enough is required, and that a due regard is had to the ability of the giver. But when taxes are laid merely to “settle the point of independence,” and when the quantity of the tax depends on the caprice of those who have the superiority, and who will doubtless lay it heavier in order to bring down the spirits or weaken the power of those who claim independence, what encouragement is there to labour or save?

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, September 24, 1765

Quote 1083 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1083 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1083 The Sun of Liberty is indeed fast setting, if not down already, in the American colonies: But I much fear instead of the candles you mention being lighted, you will hear of the works of darkness. They are in general alarmed to the last degree.

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, September 24, 1765

Quote 1084 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1084 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1084 Our Liberty and most essential privileges are struck at: Arbitrary courts are set over us, and trials by juries taken away: The Press is so restricted that we cannot complain: An army of mercenaries threatened to be billeted on us: The sources of our trade stopped; and, to compleat our ruin, the little property we had acquired, taken from us, without even allowing us the merit of giving it; I really dread the consequence.

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, September 24, 1765

Quote 1085 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1085 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1085 The parliament insist on a power over all the liberties and privileges claimed by the colonies, and hence require a blind obedience and acquiescence in whatever they do: Should the behavior of the colonies happen not to square with these sovereign notions, (as I much fear it will not) what remains but by violence to compel them to obedience. Violence will beget resentment, and provoke to acts never dreamt of: But I will not anticipate evil; I pray God avert it.

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, September 24, 1765

Quote 1086 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1086 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1086 The people by examining have gained a fuller knowledge of their rights, and are become more attentive and watchful against the encroachments of power: at the same time they are become more sensible of the resources they have among themselves for supplying their real wants.

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, November 26, 1769

Quote 1087 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1087 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1087 And as the property of land is parcelled out among the inhabitants, and almost every Farmer is a Freeholder, the spirit of liberty will be kept awake, and the love of freedom deeply rooted. And when strength and liberty combine, it is easy to foresee that a people will not long submit to arbitrary sway. Thus, by a blind infatuation and madness of politics, a weak, short-sighted Ministry, have been ruining their country, and hastening a period they seemed to dread, by the very means which they intended to prevent it.

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, November 26, 1769

Quote 1088 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1088 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1088 I have often viewed, with infinite satisfaction, the prodigious growth and power of the British Empire; and have pleased myself with the hopes that in a century or two the British Colonies would overspread this immense territory added to the Crown of Britain, carrying with them the religion of Protestants, and the laws, customs, manners, and language of the country from whence they sprung; while England placed at the head of the Empire superintended the whole, and by the wisdom of her councils prevented the jarring interests of the several inferior states, united their strength for the general good, and guarded them from the attacks of foreign powers.

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, November 26, 1769

Quote 1318 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1318 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1318
Those that feel can best judge.

Quote 1319 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1319 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1319 Q. What do you think is the reason that the people of America increase faster than in England?

-- Because they marry younger, and more generally.

Benjamin Franklin: Examination of Dr. Benjamin Franklin in the House of Commons - 1766



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