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Quote 61 details Share on Google+ - Quote 61 Linked In Share Button - Quote 61 A constitution founded on these principles introduces knowledge among the people, and inspires them with a conscious dignity becoming freemen; a general emulation takes place, which causes good humor, sociability, good manners, and good morals to be general. That elevation of sentiment inspired by such a government, makes the common people brave and enterprising. That ambition which is inspired by it makes them sober, industrious, and frugal.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 98 details Share on Google+ - Quote 98 Linked In Share Button - Quote 98 The dignity and stability of government in all its branches, the morals of the people, and every blessing of society depend so much upon an upright and skillful administration of justice, that the judicial power ought to be distinct from both the legislative and executive, and independent upon both, that so it may be a check upon both, and both should be checks upon that.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 108 details Share on Google+ - Quote 108 Linked In Share Button - Quote 108 We ought to consider what is the end of government before we determine which is the best form. Upon this point all speculative politicians will agree that the happiness of society is the end of government, as all divines and moral philosophers will agree that the happiness of the individual is the end of man....All sober inquirers after truth, ancient and modern, pagan and Christian, have declared that the happiness of man, as well as his dignity, consists in virtue.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 434 details Share on Google+ - Quote 434 Linked In Share Button - Quote 434 And you will, by the dignity of your Conduct, afford occasion for Posterity to say, when speaking of the glorious example you have exhibited to Mankind, had this day been wanting, the World had never seen the last stage of perfection to which human nature is capable of attaining.

George Washington: The Newburgh Address, January 2, 1783

Quote 492 details Share on Google+ - Quote 492 Linked In Share Button - Quote 492 The best and only safe road to honor, glory, and true dignity is justice.

George Washington: letter to Marquis de Lafayette, September 30, 1779

Quote 542 details Share on Google+ - Quote 542 Linked In Share Button - Quote 542 We have this day restored the Sovereign to whom alone men ought to be obedient. He reigns in Heaven, and with a propitious eye beholds his subjects assuming that freedom of thought and dignity of self-direction which He bestowed on them. From the rising to the setting sun, may His kingdom come!

Samuel Adams: After signing the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776

Quote 566 details Share on Google+ - Quote 566 Linked In Share Button - Quote 566 It has been observed, that "education has a greater influence on manners, than human laws can have." Human laws excite fears and apprehensions, least crimes committed may be detected and punished: But a virtuous education is calculated to reach and influence the heart, and to prevent crimes. A very judicious writer, has quoted Plato, who in shewing what care for the security of States ought to be taken of the education of youth, speaks of it as almost sufficient to supply the place both of Legislation and Administration. Such an education, which leads the youth beyond mere outside shew, will impress their minds with a profound reverence of the Deity, universal benevolence, and a warm attachment and affection towards their country. It will excite in them a just regard to Divine Revelation, which informs them of the original character and dignity of Man; and it will inspire them with a sense of true honor, which consists in conforming as much as possible, their principles, habits, and manners to that original character. It will enlarge their powers of mind, and prompt them impartially to search for truth in the consideration of every subject that may employ their thoughts; and among other branches of knowledge, it will instruct them in the skill of political architecture and jurisprudence; and qualify them to discover any error, if there should be such, in the forms and administration of Governments, and point out the method of correcting them.

Samuel Adams: Address to Massachusetts Legislature as Governor, January 17, 1794

Quote 752 details Share on Google+ - Quote 752 Linked In Share Button - Quote 752 And I think our assembly is well disposed to do everything necessary to give dignity and energy to the continental government; the only difficulty is to draw their attention from state objects to this, which, in my opinion, is much more important.

Thomas Stone: Letter to James Monroe - 15 December 1784

Quote 793 details Share on Google+ - Quote 793 Linked In Share Button - Quote 793 This is the most magnificent movement of all! There is a dignity, a majesty, a sublimity, in this last effort of the patriots that I greatly admire. The people should never rise without doing something to be remembered - something notable and striking. This destruction of the tea is so bold, so daring, so firm, intrepid and inflexible, and it must be so important consequences, and so lasting, that I cant but consider it an epocha in history!

John Adams: his diary entry on the Boston Tea party - December 17, 1773

Quote 1024 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1024 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1024 If justice, good faith, honor, gratitude & all the other Qualities which enoble the character of a nation, and fulfil the ends of Government, be the fruits of our establishments, the cause of liberty will acquire a dignity and lustre, which it has never yet enjoyed; and an example will be set which can not but have the most favorable influence on the rights of mankind. If on the other side, our Governments should be unfortunately blotted with the reverse of these cardinal and essential Virtues, the great cause which we have engaged to vindicate, will be dishonored & betrayed; the last & fairest experiment in favor of the rights of human nature will be turned against them; and their patrons & friends exposed to be insulted & silenced by the votaries of Tyranny and Usurpation.

James Madison: Report on Address to the States, April 26, 1783
Madison's Gift - David O. Stewart

Quote 1071 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1071 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1071 There—for your entertainment & amusement, will pass before you in Review the rise and fall of succeding Empires, from the birth of time to the present period—there you will at leisure Review the various Stages, and shifting scenes of the last glorious Revolution, in which you, Sir, with your compatriot Army, have reaped the Laurels of the well-fought Field, and returned triumphant with the plaudit of a gazing World. there, you will enjoy the pleasing satisfaction of viewing, as the fruit of your services in those "anxious days and nights" spent in conflicting War, an Empire rising with unrivalled dignity—And there—not confined to the present sphere, your contemplations will expand, and look forward to the brighter scenes of Eternity, and anticipate that future glory which the "pure and benign light of Revelation" most perfective of human Virtue, has taught you so firmly to realize—and there—will you, greatly perfect in those virtues which "were the characteristic of the divine author of our blessed Religion, & in humble imitation of whom," you will ripen for that seat of immortal felicity, to which, when satisfied with life, may you be raptured by an Escort of Guardian Angels. I have the honor to be with all imaginable respect

Lyman Hall: letter to George Washington, 15 August 1783

Quote 1132 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1132 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1132 Taught to regard a part of our own Species in the most abject and contemptible Degree below us, we lose that Idea of the dignity of Man which the Hand of Nature had implanted in us, for great and useful purposes.

George Mason: Virginia Charters 1773

Quote 1161 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1161 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1161 The happiness and dignity of man I admit consists in the practice of private virtues, and to this he is stimulated by the rewards promised to such conduct. In this he acts for himself, and with a view of promoting his own particular welfare.

Carter Braxton: May 1776 - address to the Convention of the Colony and Ancient Dominion of Virginia



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