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VIDEO: 25 Interesting Things You Didn't Know About George


Did you know that before fighting against the British he actually fought for the British? These are 25 interesting things you didn't know about George Washington. twitter.com/list25 www.facebook.com/list25 list25.com Check out the text version too! - list25.com/25-interes[MORE]

VIDEO: John Adams


www.presidents-usa.info/president-john-adams.htm Fast, fun facts about John Adams. Discover details and info about his life and accomplishments as an American President. Information about when he was born, his birthplace, childhood and education. This John Adams biography provid[MORE]

Quote 82 details Share on Google+ - Quote 82 Linked In Share Button - Quote 82 It has ever been my hobby-horse to see rising in America an empire of liberty, and a prospect of two or three hundred millions of freemen, without one noble or one king among them. You say it is impossible. If I should agree with you in this, I would still say, let us try the experiment, and preserve our equality as long as we can. A better system of education for the common people might preserve them long from such artificial inequalities as are prejudicial to society, by confounding the natural distinctions of right and wrong, virtue and vice.

John Adams: letter to Count Sarsfield, February 3, 1786

Quote 86 details Share on Google+ - Quote 86 Linked In Share Button - Quote 86 Laws for the liberal education of the youth, especially of the lower class of the people, are so extremely wise and useful, that, to a humane and generous mind, no expense for this purpose would be thought extravagant.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 110 details Share on Google+ - Quote 110 Linked In Share Button - Quote 110 Wisdom and knowledge, as well as virtue, diffused generally among the body of the people, being necessary for the preservation of their rights and liberties, and as these depend on spreading the opportunities and advantages of education in the various parts of the country, and among the different orders of people, it shall be the duty of legislators and magistrates... to cherish the interest of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries of them.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 111 details Share on Google+ - Quote 111 Linked In Share Button - Quote 111 Without wishing to damp the ardor of curiosity or influence the freedom of inquiry, I will hazard a prediction that, after the most industrious and impartial researchers, the longest liver of you all will find no principles, institutions or systems of education more fit in general to be transmitted to your posterity than those you have received from your ancestors.

John Adams: letter to the young men of the Philadelphia, May 7, 1798

Quote 142 details Share on Google+ - Quote 142 Linked In Share Button - Quote 142 A primary object should be the education of our youth in the science of government. In a republic, what species of knowledge can be equally important? And what duty more pressing... than ... communicating it to those who are to be the future guardians of the liberties of the country?

George Washington: A primary object should be the education of our youth in the science of government.

Quote 254 details Share on Google+ - Quote 254 Linked In Share Button - Quote 254 But of all the views of this law none is more important, none more legitimate, than that of rendering the people the safe, as they are the ultimate, guardians of their own liberty. For this purpose the reading in the first stage, where they will receive their whole education, is proposed, as has been said, to be chiefly historical. History by apprising them of the past will enable them to judge of the future; it will avail them of the experience of other times and other nations; it will qualify them as judges of the actions and designs of men; it will enable them to know ambition under every disguise it may assume; and knowing it, to defeat its views.

Thomas Jefferson: Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 14, 1781

Quote 493 details Share on Google+ - Quote 493 Linked In Share Button - Quote 493 The best means of forming a manly, virtuous, and happy people will be found in the right education of youth. Without this foundation, every other means, in my opinion, must fail.

George Washington: letter to George Chapman, December 15, 1784

Quote 561 details Share on Google+ - Quote 561 Linked In Share Button - Quote 561 I hope Congress, before they adjourn will take into very serious Consideration the necessary Amendments of the Constitution. Those whom I call the best - the most judicious & disinterested Federalists, who wish for the perpetual Union, Liberty & Happiness of the States & their respective Citizens, many of them if not all are anxiously expecting them. They wish to see a Line drawn as clearly as may be, between the federal Powers vested in Congress and the distinct Sovereignty of the several States upon which the private & personal Rights of the Citizens depend. Without such Distinction there will be Danger of the Constitution issuing imperceptibly and gradually into a consolidated Government over all the States: which, although it may be wished for by some was reprobated in the Idea by the highest Advocates for the Constitution as it stood without Amendments. I am fully persuaded that the population of the U S living different Climates, of different Education and Manners, and possessed of different Habits & feelings under one consolidated Government can not long remain free, or indeed remain under any kind of Government but despotism

Samuel Adams: Letter to Elbridge Gerry, August 22, 1789

Quote 566 details Share on Google+ - Quote 566 Linked In Share Button - Quote 566 It has been observed, that "education has a greater influence on manners, than human laws can have." Human laws excite fears and apprehensions, least crimes committed may be detected and punished: But a virtuous education is calculated to reach and influence the heart, and to prevent crimes. A very judicious writer, has quoted Plato, who in shewing what care for the security of States ought to be taken of the education of youth, speaks of it as almost sufficient to supply the place both of Legislation and Administration. Such an education, which leads the youth beyond mere outside shew, will impress their minds with a profound reverence of the Deity, universal benevolence, and a warm attachment and affection towards their country. It will excite in them a just regard to Divine Revelation, which informs them of the original character and dignity of Man; and it will inspire them with a sense of true honor, which consists in conforming as much as possible, their principles, habits, and manners to that original character. It will enlarge their powers of mind, and prompt them impartially to search for truth in the consideration of every subject that may employ their thoughts; and among other branches of knowledge, it will instruct them in the skill of political architecture and jurisprudence; and qualify them to discover any error, if there should be such, in the forms and administration of Governments, and point out the method of correcting them.

Samuel Adams: Address to Massachusetts Legislature as Governor, January 17, 1794

Quote 567 details Share on Google+ - Quote 567 Linked In Share Button - Quote 567 If we continue to be a happy people, that happiness must be assured by the enacting and executing of reasonable and wise laws, expressed in the plainest language, and by establishing such modes of education as tend to inculcate in the minds of youth, the feelings and habits of "piety, religion and morality," and to lead them to the knowledge and love of those truly Republican principles upon which our civil institutions are founded.

Samuel Adams: Address to the Legislature o f Massachusetts, January 16, 1795

Quote 570 details Share on Google+ - Quote 570 Linked In Share Button - Quote 570 As Piety, Religion and Morality have a happy influence on the minds of men, in their public as well as private transactions, you will not think it unseasonable, although I have frequently done it, to bring to your remembrance the great importance of encouraging our University, town schools, and other seminaries of education, that our children and youth while they are engaged in the pursuit of useful science, may have their minds impressed with a strong sense of the duties they owe to their God, their instructors and each other, so that when they arrive to a state of manhood, and take a part in any public transactions, their hearts having been deeply impressed in the course of their education with the moral feelings - such feelings may continue and have their due weight through the whole of their future lives.

Samuel Adams: Address to the Legislature of Massachusetts, January 30, 1797

Quote 618 details Share on Google+ - Quote 618 Linked In Share Button - Quote 618 They made an early provision by law that every town consisting of so many families should be always furnished with a grammar school. They made it a crime for such a town to be destitute of a grammar schoolmaster for a few months, and subjected it to a heavy penalty. So that the education of all ranks of people was made the care and expense of the public, in a manner that I believe has been unknown to any other people, ancient or modern. The consequences of these establishments we see and feel every day [written in 1765]. A native of America who cannot read and write is as rare ... as a comet or an earthquake

John Adams: Unknown

Quote 640 details Share on Google+ - Quote 640 Linked In Share Button - Quote 640 Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens... Let it simply be asked, where is the security for property, for reputation, for live, in the sense of religious obligations desert and oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of Justice? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education ... reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.


Quote 642 details Share on Google+ - Quote 642 Linked In Share Button - Quote 642 I think also, that general virtue is more probably to be expected and obtained from the education of youth, than from exhortations of adult persons; bad habits and vices of the mind being, like diseases of the body, more easily prevented than cured. I think moreover, that talents for the education of youth are the gift of God; and that he on whom they are bestowed, whenever a way is opened for use of them, is as strongly called as if he heard a voice from heaven...


Quote 713 details Share on Google+ - Quote 713 Linked In Share Button - Quote 713 I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them but to inform their discretion by education. This is the true corrective of abuses of Constitutional power.


Quote 725 details Share on Google+ - Quote 725 Linked In Share Button - Quote 725 Human nature with all its infirmities and depravation is still capable of great things. It is capable of attaining to degrees of wisdom and goodness, which we have reason to believe, appear as respectable in the estimation of superior intelligences. Education makes a greater difference between man and man, than nature has made between man and brute. The virtues and powers to which men may be trained, by early education and constant discipline, are truly sublime and astonishing. Newton and Locke are examples of the deep sagacity which may be acquired by long habits of thinking and study.

John Adams: Letter to Abigail Adams, October 29, 1775

Quote 733 details Share on Google+ - Quote 733 Linked In Share Button - Quote 733 The genuine and simple religion of Jesus will one day be restored: such as it was preached and practiced by himself. Very soon after his death it became muffled up in mysteries, and has been ever since kept in concealment from the vulgar eye. To penetrate and dissipate these clouds of darkness, the general mind must be strengthened by education.

Thomas Jefferson: Letter to François Adriaan Van der Kemp, July 9, 1820

Quote 763 details Share on Google+ - Quote 763 Linked In Share Button - Quote 763 I consider knowledge to be the soul of a republic, and as the weak and wicked are generally in alliance, as much care should be taken to diminish the number of the former as of that latter. Education is the way to do this, and nothing should be left undone to afford all ranks of people that means of obtaining a proper degree of it at a cheap and easy rate.

John Jay: To Benjamin Rush - March 21, 1785

Quote 830 details Share on Google+ - Quote 830 Linked In Share Button - Quote 830
The only foundation for a useful education in a republic is to be laid in religion. Without this there can be no virtue, and without virtue there can be no liberty, and liberty is the object and life of all republican governments.

Benjamin Rush: On the Mode of Education Proper in a Republic 1806
For God and Country (T.K. Marion)

Quote 840 details Share on Google+ - Quote 840 Linked In Share Button - Quote 840
Such is my veneration for every religion that reveals the attributes of the Deity, or a future state of rewards and punishments, that I had rather see the opinions of Confucius or Mahomed inculcated upon our youth than see them grow up wholly devoid of a system of religious principles.

Benjamin Rush: Of the Mode of Education Proper in the Republic - 1806

Quote 1238 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1238 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1238 Many of the first Settlers of these Provinces, were Men who had received a good Education in Europe, and to their Wisdom and good Management we owe much of our present Prosperity. But their Hands were full, and they could not do all Things. The present Race are not thought to be generally of equal Ability: For though the American Youth are allow’d not to want Capacity; yet the best Capacities require Cultivation, it being truly with them, as with the best Ground, which unless well tilled and sowed with profitable Seed, produces only ranker Weeds.

Benjamin Franklin: Proposals Relating to the Education of Youth in Pennsylvania, October 1749

Quote 1255 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1255 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1255
Bigotry is the disease of ignorance, of morbid minds; enthusiasm of the free and buoyant. Education and free discussion are the antidotes of both.

Quote 1317 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1317 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1317 To instruct, to advise, to qualify those, who have been restored to freedom, for the exercise and enjoyment of civil liberty, to promote in them habits of industry, to furnish them with employments suited to their age, sex, talents, and other circumstances, and to procure their children an education calculated for their future situation in life; these are the great outlines of the annexed plan, which we have adopted, and which we conceive will essentially promote the public good, and the happiness of these our hitherto too much neglected fellow-creatures.

Benjamin Franklin: Address to the public - 1789
Quoted Document: An Address to the Public (Concerning Slavery)



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