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Quote 1134 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1134 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1134
Every society, all government, and every kind of civil compact therefore, is or ought to be, calculated for the general good and safety of the community.

George Mason: remarks on Annual Elections for the Fairfax Independent Company, April 1775

Quote 1135 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1135 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1135 In all our associations; in all our agreements let us never lose sight of this fundamental maxim — that all power was originally lodged in, and consequently is derived from, the people.

George Mason: remarks on Annual Elections for the Fairfax Independent Company, April 1775

Quote 1136 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1136 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1136 We came equals into this world, and equals shall we go out of it.

George Mason: remarks on Annual Elections for the Fairfax Independent Company, April 1775

Quote 1137 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1137 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1137 All men are by nature born equally free and independent.

George Mason: remarks on Annual Elections for the Fairfax Independent Company, April 1775

Quote 1177 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1177 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1177 I can meet you and will if it is approved with 100. horse on the frontier of the state, and conduct you here or home, or if military parade is declined and civil preferr’d a like attention might be shewn by me & such of the council as wod. unite. Perhaps a military parade with me at its head might set a bad precedent & lead to bad consequences hereafter, it being but a step to other things, especially when foreign powers are so disposed to interfere in our elections.


Quote 1212 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1212 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1212 Of a very different nature, tho' only one degree better than the other reasoning, is all that sublimity of nonsense and alarm, that has been thundered against it in every shape of metaphoric terror, on the subject of a bill of rights, the liberty of the press, rights of conscience, rights of taxation and election, trials in the vicinity, freedom of speech, trial by jury, and a standing army. These last are undoubtedly important points, much too important to depend on mere paper protection. For, guard such privileges by the strongest expressions, still if you leave the legislative and executive power in the hands of those who are or may be disposed to deprive you of them you are but slaves.

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Nov 22, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 1240 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1240 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1240 The Day is now approaching, when your free Choice is to determine whether this Province is to continue the miserable Seat of Discord, and its admirable Constitution and Charter be at last sacrificed to private Ambition and personal Rancor; or whether, by delegating your Powers to Persons of known Independency, attached to our Constitution, and free from all Party-Animosity, we shall at length be restored to our wonted Peace and Prosperity.

Benjamin Franklin: Papers from the Election Campaign, September 1764



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