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Quote 549 details Share on Google+ - Quote 549 Linked In Share Button - Quote 549 There is One above us who will take exemplary vengeance for every insult upon His majesty. You know that the cause of America is just. You know that she contends for that freedom to which all men are entitled - that she contends against oppression, rapine, and more than savage barbarity. The blood of the innocent is upon your hands, and all the waters of the ocean will not wash it away. We again make our solemn appeal to the God of heaven to decide between you and us. And we pray that, in the doubtful scale of battle, we may be successful as we have justice on our side, and that the merciful Savior of the world may forgive our oppressors.

Samuel Adams: Letter to the Earl of Carlisle and Others, July 16, 1778

Quote 580 details Share on Google+ - Quote 580 Linked In Share Button - Quote 580 The price of freedom is eternal vigilance


Quote 636 details Share on Google+ - Quote 636 Linked In Share Button - Quote 636 To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical.

Quote 637 details Share on Google+ - Quote 637 Linked In Share Button - Quote 637 Only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become corrupt and vicious, they have more need for masters

Benjamin Franklin: letter to the Abbes Chalut and Arnoux, 1787

Quote 643 details Share on Google+ - Quote 643 Linked In Share Button - Quote 643 I thank God that I have lived to see my country independent and free. She may long enjoy her independence and freedom if she will. It depends on her virtue.

Samuel Adams: Unknown

Quote 644 details Share on Google+ - Quote 644 Linked In Share Button - Quote 644
The sum of all is, if we would most truly enjoy the gift of Heave, let us become a virtuous people; then shall we both deserve to enjoy it. While, on the other hand, if we are universally vicious and debauched in our manners, through the form of our Constitution carries the face of the most exalted freedom, we shall in reality be the most abject slaves.

Samuel Adams: Unknown

Quote 652 details Share on Google+ - Quote 652 Linked In Share Button - Quote 652 Let me add that only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters


Quote 656 details Share on Google+ - Quote 656 Linked In Share Button - Quote 656

Thomas Jefferson: Bill for Establishing Religious Freedom, 1779
Quoted Document: A Bill for Establishing Religious Freedom

Quote 658 details Share on Google+ - Quote 658 Linked In Share Button - Quote 658 Freedom of discussion, unaided by power, is... sufficient for the propagation and protection of truth

Thomas Jefferson: Second Inaugural Address, 1805

Quote 666 details Share on Google+ - Quote 666 Linked In Share Button - Quote 666 Honour, justice, and humanity, forbid us tamely to surrender that freedom which we received from our gallant ancestors, and which our innocent posterity have a right to receive from us. We cannot endure the infamy and guilt of resigning succeeding generations to that wretchedness which inevitably awaits them, if we ba...sely entail hereditary bondage upon them.


Quote 667 details Share on Google+ - Quote 667 Linked In Share Button - Quote 667 Posterity, you will never know how much it cost the present generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you will make good use of it. If you do not, I shall repent in heaven that ever I took half the pains to preserve it.

John Adams: Unknown

Quote 736 details Share on Google+ - Quote 736 Linked In Share Button - Quote 736 Of all the enemies to public liberty, war is, perhaps, the most to be dreaded, because it comprises and develops the germ of every other. War is the parent of armies; from these proceed debts and taxes; and armies, and debts, and taxes are the known instruments for bringing the many under the domination of the few. In war, too, the discretionary power of the Executive is extended; its influence in dealing out offices, honors, and emoluments is multiplied; and all the means of seducing the minds are added to those of subduing the force of the people. The same malignant aspect in republicanism may be traced in the inequality of fortunes and the opportunities of fraud growing out of a state of war, and in the degeneracy of manners and of morals engendered by both. No nation could reserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.

James Madison: Political Observations, April 20, 1795

Quote 778 details Share on Google+ - Quote 778 Linked In Share Button - Quote 778 I confess I do not see in what case the Congress can, with any pretense of right, make a law to suppress the freedom of the press.

Richard Henry Lee: Letters of the Federal farmer - 1788

Quote 799 details Share on Google+ - Quote 799 Linked In Share Button - Quote 799 One of the most essential branches of English liberty is the freedom of ones house. A mans house is his castle; and whilst he is quiet, he is as well guarded as a prince in his castle.

James Otis: Argument against the writs of assistance - February 1761

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It is Favorable to liberty. Freedom can exist only in the society of knowledge. Without learning, men are incapable of knowing their rights, and where learning is confined to a few people, liberty can be neither equal nor universal.

Benjamin Rush: Essay, 1786

Quote 824 details Share on Google+ - Quote 824 Linked In Share Button - Quote 824 Political freedom includes in it every other blessing. All the pleasures of riches, science, virtue, and religion itself derive their value from liberty alone. No wonder therefore wise and prudent legislators have in all ages been held in such great veneration; and no wonder too those illustrious souls who have employed their pens and sacrificed their lives in defense of liberty have met with such universal applause. Their reputations, like some majestic river which enlarges and widens as it approaches its parent ocean, shall become greater and greater through every age and outlive the ruins of the world itself.

Benjamin Rush: To Catharine Macaulay - January 18, 1769

Quote 845 details Share on Google+ - Quote 845 Linked In Share Button - Quote 845 For instance, the liberty of the press, which has been a copious subject of declamation and opposition: what control can proceed from the federal government, to shackle or destroy that sacred palladium of national freedom? ... the proposed system possesses no influence whatever upon the press; and it would have been merely nugatory, to have introduced a formal declaration upon the subject; nay, that very declaration might have been construed to imply that some degree of power was given, since we undertook to define its extent.

James Wilson: Address in Philadelphia, 1787

Quote 953 details Share on Google+ - Quote 953 Linked In Share Button - Quote 953 Our Declaration of Independence I dare say you has seen. A few weeks will probably determine our fate. Perfect freedom, or Absolute Slavery. To some of us freedom or a halter.

Abraham Clark: letter to Eias Dayton, July 14, 1776

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To preserver the freedom of the human mind ... and freedom of the press, every spirit should be ready to devote itself to martyrdom; for as long as we may think as we will, and speak as we think the condition of man will proceed in improvement.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to William Green Munford, June 18, 1799
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 959 details Share on Google+ - Quote 959 Linked In Share Button - Quote 959
... the enthusiasm which characterizes youth should lift its parricide hands against freedom and science would be such a monstrous phenomenon as I cannot place among possible things in this age and country.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to William Green Munford, June 18, 1799
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 960 details Share on Google+ - Quote 960 Linked In Share Button - Quote 960 For if Men are to be precluded from offering their Sentiments on a matter, which may involve the most serious and alarming consequences, that can invite the consideration of Mankind, reason is of not use to us; the freedom of Speech may be taken away, and dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep, to the Slaughter.


Quote 1008 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1008 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1008 There are certain fundamental laws to, and interwoven with ye English Constitution, which even a Parliament itself can not abrogate. Such I take to be that allowed maxim of the constitution, that invaluable privilege, the birthright of Englishmen of being taxed with their own consent; the definition of freedom is the being governed by laws to which we have given our consent, as the definition of slavery is the very reverse.

Charles Carroll: preface - Unpublished letters of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, 1737-1832
Unpublished letters of Charles Carrol of Carrollton

Quote 1087 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1087 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1087 And as the property of land is parcelled out among the inhabitants, and almost every Farmer is a Freeholder, the spirit of liberty will be kept awake, and the love of freedom deeply rooted. And when strength and liberty combine, it is easy to foresee that a people will not long submit to arbitrary sway. Thus, by a blind infatuation and madness of politics, a weak, short-sighted Ministry, have been ruining their country, and hastening a period they seemed to dread, by the very means which they intended to prevent it.

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, November 26, 1769

Quote 1117 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1117 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1117 But it is religion and morality alone, which can establish the principles upon which freedom can surely stand.


Quote 1212 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1212 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1212 Of a very different nature, tho' only one degree better than the other reasoning, is all that sublimity of nonsense and alarm, that has been thundered against it in every shape of metaphoric terror, on the subject of a bill of rights, the liberty of the press, rights of conscience, rights of taxation and election, trials in the vicinity, freedom of speech, trial by jury, and a standing army. These last are undoubtedly important points, much too important to depend on mere paper protection. For, guard such privileges by the strongest expressions, still if you leave the legislative and executive power in the hands of those who are or may be disposed to deprive you of them you are but slaves.

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Nov 22, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman



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