Site Search for: GEORGE WASHINGTON

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Quote 769 details Share on Google+ - Quote 769 Linked In Share Button - Quote 769 We have considered the previous question stated in a letter written by your direction to us by the Secretary of Sate on the 18th of last Month, the liens of separation drawn by the Constitution between the three departments of government. These being in certain respects checks upon each other, and our being judges of a court in the last resort, are considerations which afford strong arguments against the propriety of our extra-judicially deciding the questions alluded to, especially as the power given by the Constitution the President, of calling on the heads of departments for opinions, seems to have been purposely and well as expressly united to the executive departments.

John Jay: To George Washington - August 8, 1793

Quote 1037 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1037 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1037 With this great example before me [George Washington], with the sense and spirit, the faith and honor, the duty and interest, of the same American people pledged to support the Constitution of the United States, I entertain no doubt of its continuance in all its energy, and my mind is prepared without hesitation to lay myself under the most solemn obligations to support it to the utmost of my power.

John Adams: Inaugural Address - Philadelphia March 4, 1797
Quoted Document: John Adams Inaugural Address

Quote 1068 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1068 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1068 [On appointment of George Washington to President] Permit me then with great sincerity to salute you on the occasion and particularly to congratulate my Country and all America on this appointment.

Carter Braxton: letter to George Washington, 15 April 1789

Quote 1069 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1069 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1069 The jarring & divided Sentiments on the merits of this untryed System, combine in this Choice And under your Patronage its operations will be undisturbed & viewed with the indulgent Eye of impartiality. To this proof I have ever referred the opponents as the true standard by which to judge of the Constitution. And if I may be allowed to prejudge any event I think I may predict that opposition will weaken as the Government goes on. The Horrors supposed to be inherent in the Texture will wear off & if the People feel no additional burden they will think well of it. If I may be allowed to hope on the first movements, it would be that the present taxes on Land & Slaves might be discontinued & the Sum raised from duties which was formerly required from them. This would immovebly fix a predelection in the Minds of the People in favour of this Government which the oratory of a Henry could not move. But I see I am trespassing on the province of others.

Carter Braxton: letter to George Washington, 15 April 1789

Quote 1070 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1070 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1070 With them Sir I sincerely and most heartily join; now can I in more emphatical language express my esteem, my gratitude & my devoutest wishes for your future fame and happiness; than is done in those earnest recommendations of the Assembly.

Lyman Hall: letter to George Washington, 15 August 1783

Quote 1071 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1071 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1071 There—for your entertainment & amusement, will pass before you in Review the rise and fall of succeding Empires, from the birth of time to the present period—there you will at leisure Review the various Stages, and shifting scenes of the last glorious Revolution, in which you, Sir, with your compatriot Army, have reaped the Laurels of the well-fought Field, and returned triumphant with the plaudit of a gazing World. there, you will enjoy the pleasing satisfaction of viewing, as the fruit of your services in those "anxious days and nights" spent in conflicting War, an Empire rising with unrivalled dignity—And there—not confined to the present sphere, your contemplations will expand, and look forward to the brighter scenes of Eternity, and anticipate that future glory which the "pure and benign light of Revelation" most perfective of human Virtue, has taught you so firmly to realize—and there—will you, greatly perfect in those virtues which "were the characteristic of the divine author of our blessed Religion, & in humble imitation of whom," you will ripen for that seat of immortal felicity, to which, when satisfied with life, may you be raptured by an Escort of Guardian Angels. I have the honor to be with all imaginable respect

Lyman Hall: letter to George Washington, 15 August 1783

Quote 1089 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1089 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1089 My Situation is rather unlucky in A Government very deficient in its Laws and those greatly relaxed in their Execution, A Legislature as yet incompleat and not disposed to unite and give Aid to the executive Authority.

George Read: letter to George Washington, February 5 1778

Quote 1103 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1103 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1103 [George Washington] And as to you, Sir, treacherous is private friendship (for so you have been to me, and that in the day of danger) and a hypocrite in public life, the world will be puzzled to decide whether you are an apostate or an impostor; whether you have abandoned good principles, or whether you ever had any.

Quote 1104 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1104 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1104 I return your Excellency Thanks for your Polite Congratulation on my Appointment to the Government of this State, and shall be happy if by my Exertions in my Department I shall be able to contribute to the general Interest and Welfare of the United States.

William Paca: letter to George Washington, April 25, 1783

Quote 1105 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1105 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1105 As long Sir as Mankind shall retain a proper Sense of the Blessings of Peace Liberty and Safety, your Character in every Country and in every Age will be honor’d admir’d and rever’d: but to a Mind elevated as your’s, the Consciousness of having done Great and illustrious Deeds from the purest Principles of Patriotism; of having by your Wisdom and Magnanimity arrested the Arm of Tyranny—saved a dear Country and Millions of Fellow Citizens—and Millions yet unborn—from Slavery and all the Horrors and Calamities of Slavery, and placed their Rights and Liberties on a Permanent Foundation—must yield a Satisfaction infinitely superior to all the Pomp and Eclat of applauding Ages and admiring Worlds.

William Paca: letter to George Washington, December 20, 1783

Quote 1106 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1106 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1106 Amidst the general Joy on the happy and honourable Termination of the War we beg Leave to welcome your Excellency’s return to this City with Hearts Full of Gratitude and Affection.

William Paca: letter to George Washington, December 20, 1783

Quote 1118 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1118 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1118 To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest Glory to laud the more distinguished Character of Christian.

George Washington: Orders issued on May 2, 1778 by George Washington to his troops at Valley Forge
For God and Country (T.K. Marion)

Quote 1127 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1127 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1127 Our All is at Stake, and the little Conveniences and Comforts of Life, when set in Competition with our Liberty, ought to be rejected not with Reluctance but with Pleasure.

George Mason: letter to George Washington, April 5, 1769

Quote 1144 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1144 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1144 Good husbandry with us consists in abandoning Indian corn and tobacco, tending small grain, some red clover following, and endeavoring to have, while the lands are at rest, a spontaneous cover of white clover. I do not present this as a culture judicious in itself, but as good in comparison with what most people there pursue.


Quote 1265 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1265 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1265 Light reading (by this, I mean books of little importance) may amuse for the moment, but leaves nothing solid behind.

Quote 1302 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1302 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1302 When a question arises, whether any particular law or appointment is still in force, we are to examine, not whether it was pronounced by the ancient or present organ, but whether it has been at any time revoked by the authority of the nation, expressed by the organ competent at the time.

Quote 1356 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1356 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1356 Errors, or caprices of the temper, can be pardoned and forgotten; but a cold, deliberate crime of the heart ... is not to be washed away.

Quote 1374 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1374 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1374
To speak evil of anyone, unless there is unequivocal proofs of their deserving it, is an injury for which there is no adequate reparation.



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