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Quote 215 details Share on Google+ - Quote 215 Linked In Share Button - Quote 215 There is no part of the administration of government that requires extensive information and a thorough knowledge of the principles of political economy, so much as the business of taxation. The man who understands those principles best will be least likely to resort to oppressive expedients, or sacrifice any particular class of citizens to the procurement of revenue. It might be demonstrated that the most productive system of finance will always be the least burdensome.


Quote 218 details Share on Google+ - Quote 218 Linked In Share Button - Quote 218 This balance between the National and State governments ought to be dwelt on with peculiar attention, as it is of the utmost importance. It forms a double security to the people. If one encroaches on their rights they will find a powerful protection in the other. Indeed, they will both be prevented from overpassing their constitutional limits by a certain rivalship, which will ever subsist between them.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 17, 1788

Quote 221 details Share on Google+ - Quote 221 Linked In Share Button - Quote 221 To grant that there is a supreme intelligence who rules the world and has established laws to regulate the actions of his creatures; and still to assert that man, in a state of nature, may be considered as perfectly free from all restraints of law and government, appears to a common understanding altogether irreconcilable. Good and wise men, in all ages, have embraced a very dissimilar theory. They have supposed that the deity, from the relations we stand in to himself and to each other, has constituted an eternal and immutable law, which is indispensably obligatory upon all mankind, prior to any human institution whatever. This is what is called the law of nature....Upon this law depend the natural rights of mankind.

Alexander Hamilton: The Farmer Refuted, February 23, 1775

Quote 225 details Share on Google+ - Quote 225 Linked In Share Button - Quote 225 Were the pictures which have been drawn by the political jealousy of some among us faithful likenesses of the human character, the inference would be, that there is not sufficient virtue among men for self-government; and that nothing less than the chains of despotism can restrain them from destroying and devouring one another.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 55, February 15, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 227 details Share on Google+ - Quote 227 Linked In Share Button - Quote 227 When you assemble from your several counties in the Legislature, were every member to be guided only by the apparent interest of his county, government would be impracticable. There must be a perpetual accommodation and sacrifice of local advantage to general expediency.

Alexander Hamilton: speech at the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 230 details Share on Google+ - Quote 230 Linked In Share Button - Quote 230 Whoever attentively considers the different departments of power must perceive, that, in a government in which they are separated from each other, the judiciary, from the nature of its functions, will always be the least dangerous to the political rights of the Constitution; because it will be least in a capacity to annoy or injure them.


Quote 231 details Share on Google+ - Quote 231 Linked In Share Button - Quote 231 Why has government been instituted at all? Because the passions of men will not conform to the dictates of reason and justice without constraint.


Quote 232 details Share on Google+ - Quote 232 Linked In Share Button - Quote 232 Wise politicians will be cautious about fettering the government with restrictions that cannot be observed, because they know that every break of the fundamental laws, though dictated by necessity, impairs that sacred reverence which ought to be maintained in the breast of rulers towards the constitution of a country.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 25, December 21, 1787
The Federalist Papers

Quote 240 details Share on Google+ - Quote 240 Linked In Share Button - Quote 240 A judiciary independent of a king or executive alone, is a good thing; but independence of the will of the nation is a solecism, at least in a republican government.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Thomas Ritchie, December 25, 1820

Quote 242 details Share on Google+ - Quote 242 Linked In Share Button - Quote 242 A rigid economy of the public contributions and absolute interdiction of all useless expenses will go far towards keeping the government honest and unoppressive.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Lafayette, 1823

Quote 247 details Share on Google+ - Quote 247 Linked In Share Button - Quote 247
Although a republican government is slow to move, yet when once in motion, its momentum becomes irresistible.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Francis C. Gray, 1815

Quote 251 details Share on Google+ - Quote 251 Linked In Share Button - Quote 251 At the establishment of our constitutions, the judiciary bodies were supposed to be the most helpless and harmless members of the government. Experience, however, soon showed in what way they were to become the most dangerous; that the insufficiency of the means provided for their removal gave them a freehold and irresponsibility in office; that their decisions, seeming to concern individual suitors only, pass silent and unheeded by the public at large; that these decisions, nevertheless, become law by precedent, sapping, by little and little, the foundations of the constitution, and working its change by construction, before any one has perceived that that invisible and helpless worm has been busily employed in consuming its substance. In truth, man is not made to be trusted for life, if secured against all liability to account.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Monsieur A. Coray, Oct 31, 1823

Quote 252 details Share on Google+ - Quote 252 Linked In Share Button - Quote 252 Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between man and his God, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legislative powers of government reach actions only, and not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should "make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof," thus building a wall of separation between church and State.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to a Committee of the Danbury Baptist Association, Connecticut, January 1, 1802

Quote 267 details Share on Google+ - Quote 267 Linked In Share Button - Quote 267 If free governments the rulers are the servants, and the people their superiors and sovereigns. For the former, therefore, to return among the latter was not to degrade but to promote them.

Benjamin Franklin: Convention debate (26 July 1787)

Quote 274 details Share on Google+ - Quote 274 Linked In Share Button - Quote 274 ...there is no Form of Government but what may be a Blessing to the People if well administred; and I believe farther that this is likely to be well adminstred for a Course of Years, and can only end in Despotism as other Forms have done before it, when the People shall become so corrupted as to need Despotic Government, being incapable of any other.

Benjamin Franklin: Speech on Sept. 17 1787

Quote 276 details Share on Google+ - Quote 276 Linked In Share Button - Quote 276 Much of the Strength and Efficiency of any Government in procuring and securing Happiness to the People depends on Opinion, on the general Opinion of the Goodness of that Government as well as of the Wisdom and Integrity of its Governors. I hope therefore that for our own Sakes, as a Part of the People, and for the sake of our Posterity we shall act heartily and unanimously in recommending this Constitution, wherever our Influence may extend, and turn our future Thoughts and Endeavors to the Means of having it well administered.

Benjamin Franklin: Speech on Sept. 17 1787

Quote 281 details Share on Google+ - Quote 281 Linked In Share Button - Quote 281 Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers of the people alone. The people themselves, therefore, are its only safe depositories.

Thomas Jefferson: Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 14, 1781

Quote 283 details Share on Google+ - Quote 283 Linked In Share Button - Quote 283 For example. If the system be established on basis of Income, and his just proportion on that scale has been already drawn from every one, to step into the field of Consumption, and tax special articles in that, as broadcloth or homespun, wine or whiskey, a coach or a wagon, is doubly taxing the same article. For that portion of Income with which these articles are purchased, having already paid its tax as Income, to pay another tax on the thing it purchased, is paying twice for the same thing; it is an aggrievance on the citizens who use these articles in exoneration of those who do not, contrary to the most sacred of the duties of a government, to do equal and impartial justice to all its citizens.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Joseph Milligan, April 6, 1816

Quote 294 details Share on Google+ - Quote 294 Linked In Share Button - Quote 294 If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be. The functionaries of every government have propensities to command at will the liberty and property of their constituents. There is no safe deposit for these but with the people themselves; nor can they be safe with them without information. Where the press is free, and every man able to read , all is safe.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Colonel Charles Yancey, January 6, 1816
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 295 details Share on Google+ - Quote 295 Linked In Share Button - Quote 295 A dependence on the people is, no doubt, the primary control on the government; but experience has taught mankind the necessity of auxiliary precautions.

James Madison: Federalist No. 51, February 8, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 296 details Share on Google+ - Quote 296 Linked In Share Button - Quote 296 A just security to property is not afforded by that government, under which unequal taxes oppress one species of property and reward another species.

James Madison: Essay on Property, March 29, 1792

Quote 298 details Share on Google+ - Quote 298 Linked In Share Button - Quote 298 A popular Government, without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy; or, perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance: And a people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.

James Madison: letter to W.T. Barry, August 4, 1822

Quote 299 details Share on Google+ - Quote 299 Linked In Share Button - Quote 299 A republic, by which I mean a government in which the scheme of representation takes place, opens a different prospect and promises the cure for which we are seeking.

James Madison: letter to William Hunter, March 11, 1790

Quote 302 details Share on Google+ - Quote 302 Linked In Share Button - Quote 302 Ambition must be made to counteract ambition. The interest of the man must be connected with the constitutional rights of the place. It may be a reflection on human nature that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of government. What is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature?

James Madison: Federalist No. 51, February 8, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 306 details Share on Google+ - Quote 306 Linked In Share Button - Quote 306 An elective despotism was not the government we fought for; but one in which the powers of government should be so divided and balanced among the several bodies of magistracy as that no one could transcend their legal limits without being effectually checked and restrained by the others.

James Madison: Federalist No. 58, 1788
The Federalist Papers



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