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Quote 372 details Share on Google+ - Quote 372 Linked In Share Button - Quote 372 The great desideratum in Government is, so to modify the sovereignty as that it may be sufficiently neutral between different parts of the Society to control one part from invading the rights of another, and at the same time sufficiently controlled itself, from setting up an interest adverse to that of the entire Society.

James Madison: letter to Thomas Jefferson, October 24, 1787

Quote 373 details Share on Google+ - Quote 373 Linked In Share Button - Quote 373 The house of representatives...can make no law which will not have its full operation on themselves and their friends, as well as the great mass of society. This has always been deemed one of the strongest bonds by which human policy can connect the rulers and the people together. It creates between them that communion of interest, and sympathy of sentiments, of which few governments have furnished examples; but without which every government degenerates into tyranny.

James Madison: Federalist No. 57, February 19, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 374 details Share on Google+ - Quote 374 Linked In Share Button - Quote 374 The invasion of private rights is chiefly to be apprehended, not from acts of Government contrary to the sense of its constituents, but from acts in which the Government is the mere instrument of the major number of the Constituents.

James Madison: letter to Thomas Jefferson, October 17, 1788

Quote 378 details Share on Google+ - Quote 378 Linked In Share Button - Quote 378 The operations of the federal government will be most extensive and important in times of war and danger; those of the State governments, in times of peace and security.

James Madison: Federalist No. 45, January 26, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 379 details Share on Google+ - Quote 379 Linked In Share Button - Quote 379 The passions, therefore, not the reason, of the public would sit in judgment. But it is the reason, alone, of the public, that ought to control and regulate the government. The passions ought to be controlled and regulated by the government.

James Madison: Federalist No. 49, February 5, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 380 details Share on Google+ - Quote 380 Linked In Share Button - Quote 380 The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State governments are numerous and indefinite.

James Madison: Federalist No. 45, January 26, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 385 details Share on Google+ - Quote 385 Linked In Share Button - Quote 385 They accomplished a revolution which has no parallel in the annals of human society. They reared the fabrics of governments which have no model on the face of the globe. They formed the design of a great Confederacy, which it is incumbent on their successors to improve and perpetuate.

James Madison: Federalist No. 14, November 30, 1787
The Federalist Papers

Quote 389 details Share on Google+ - Quote 389 Linked In Share Button - Quote 389 We are teaching the world the great truth that Governments do better without Kings & Nobles than with them. The merit will be doubled by the other lesson that Religion Flourishes in greater purity, without than with the aid of Government.

James Madison: letter to Edward Livingston, July 10, 1822

Quote 390 details Share on Google+ - Quote 390 Linked In Share Button - Quote 390 We have heard of the impious doctrine in the old world, that the people were made for kings, not kings for the people. Is the same doctrine to be revived in the new, in another shape — that the solid happiness of the people is to be sacrificed to the views of political institutions of a different form? It is too early for politicians to presume on our forgetting that the public good, the real welfare of the great body of the people, is the supreme object to be pursued; and that no form of government whatever has any other value than as it may be fitted for the attainment of this object.

James Madison: Federalist No. 45, January 26, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 396 details Share on Google+ - Quote 396 Linked In Share Button - Quote 396 Wherever the real power in a Government lies, there is the danger of oppression

James Madison: letter to Thomas Jefferson, October 17, 1788

Quote 400 details Share on Google+ - Quote 400 Linked In Share Button - Quote 400 [I]n the next place, to show that unless these departments be so far connected and blended as to give to each a constitutional control over the others, the degree of separation which the maxim requires, as essential to a free government, can never in practice be duly maintained.

James Madison: Federalist No. 48, February 1, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 401 details Share on Google+ - Quote 401 Linked In Share Button - Quote 401 [I]t is the reason alone, of the public, that ought to control and regulate the government.

James Madison: Federalist No. 49, February 5, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 404 details Share on Google+ - Quote 404 Linked In Share Button - Quote 404 [T]he government of the United States is a definite government, confined to specified objects. It is not like the state governments, whose powers are more general. Charity is no part of the legislative duty of the government.

James Madison: speech in the House of Representatives, January 10, 1794

Quote 408 details Share on Google+ - Quote 408 Linked In Share Button - Quote 408 A nation under a well regulated government, should permit none to remain uninstructed. It is monarchical and aristocratical government only that requires ignorance for its support.

Thomas Paine: Rights of Man, 1792
Quoted Document: Rights of Man - Thomas Paine

Quote 409 details Share on Google+ - Quote 409 Linked In Share Button - Quote 409 As parents, we can have no joy, knowing that this government is not sufficiently lasting to ensure any thing which we may bequeath to posterity: And by a plain method of argument, as we are running the next generation into debt, we ought to do the work of it, otherwise we use them meanly and pitifully. In order to discover the line of our duty rightly, we should take our children in our hand, and fix our station a few years farther into life; that eminence will present a prospect, which a few present fears and prejudices conceal from our sight.

Thomas Paine: Common Sense, 1776
Quoted Document: Common Sense - Thomas Paine

Quote 411 details Share on Google+ - Quote 411 Linked In Share Button - Quote 411 He that would make his own liberty secure, must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty, he establishes a precedent that will reach to himself.

Thomas Paine: Dissertation on First Principles of Government, December 23, 1791
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...
Quoted Document: Dissertation on first-principles of government

Quote 413 details Share on Google+ - Quote 413 Linked In Share Button - Quote 413 If, from the more wretched parts of the old world, we look at those which are in an advanced stage of improvement, we still find the greedy hand of government thrusting itself into every corner and crevice of industry, and grasping the spoil of the multitude. Invention is continually exercised, to furnish new pretenses for revenues and taxation. It watches prosperity as its prey and permits none to escape without tribute.

Thomas Paine: Rights of Man, 1791
Quoted Document: Rights of Man - Thomas Paine

Quote 417 details Share on Google+ - Quote 417 Linked In Share Button - Quote 417 Society in every state is a blessing, but government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one; for when we suffer or are exposed to the same miseries by a government, which we might expect in a country without government, our calamity is heightened by reflecting that we furnish the means by which we suffer.

Thomas Paine: Common Sense, 1776
Quoted Document: Common Sense - Thomas Paine

Quote 432 details Share on Google+ - Quote 432 Linked In Share Button - Quote 432 Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence, (I conjure you to believe me fellow citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake; since history and experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of Republican Government.

George Washington: Farewell Address, September 19, 1796

Quote 440 details Share on Google+ - Quote 440 Linked In Share Button - Quote 440 Democratical States must always feel before they can see: it is this that makes their Governments slow, but the people will be right at last.

George Washington: letter to Marquis de Lafayette, July 25, 1785

Quote 442 details Share on Google+ - Quote 442 Linked In Share Button - Quote 442 For myself the delay [in assuming the office of the President] may be compared with a reprieve; for in confidence I assure you, with the world it would obtain little credit that my movements to the chair of Government will be accompanied by feelings not unlike those of a culprit who is going to the place of his execution: so unwilling am I, in the evening of a life nearly consumed in public cares, to quit a peaceful abode for an Ocean of difficulties, without that competency of political skill, abilities and inclination which is necessary to manage the helm.

George Washington: comment to General Henry Knox, March 1789

Quote 449 details Share on Google+ - Quote 449 Linked In Share Button - Quote 449 I can truly say I had rather be at Mount Vernon with a friend or two about me, than to be attended at the Seat of Government by the Officers of State and the Representatives of every Power in Europe.

George Washington: letter to David Stuart, June 15, 1790

Quote 455 details Share on Google+ - Quote 455 Linked In Share Button - Quote 455 I now make it my earnest prayer, that God would have you, and the State over which you preside, in his holy protection, that he would incline the hearts of the Citizens to cultivate a spirit of subordination and obedience to Government, to entertain a brotherly affection and love for one another, for their fellow Citizens of the United States at large, and particularly for their brethren who have served in the Field, and finally, that he would most graciously be pleased to dispose us all, to do Justice, to love mercy, and to demean ourselves with that Charity, humility and pacific temper of mind, which were the Characteristicks of the Divine Author of our blessed Religion, and without an humble imitation of whose example in these things, we can never hope to be a happy Nation.

George Washington: circular letter of farewell to the Army, June 8, 1783

Quote 461 details Share on Google+ - Quote 461 Linked In Share Button - Quote 461 In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.

George Washington: Farewell Address, September 19, 1796

Quote 463 details Share on Google+ - Quote 463 Linked In Share Button - Quote 463 It appears to me, then, little short of a miracle, that the Delegates from so many different States ... should unite in forming a system of national Government, so little liable to well founded objections.

George Washington: letter to Marquis de Lafayette, February 7, 1788



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