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Results 26-50

ARTICLE: The Bill of Rights


"On February 6, 1788, Massachusetts, by a narrow margin of 19 votes in a convention with a membership of 335, endorsed the new Constitution, but recommended that a bill of rights be added to protect the States from Federal encroachment on individual liberties. . . . New York ra[MORE]

ARTICLE: George Washington - The Best President?


George Washington is a much-admired person in many respects. As the first president of the United States, he set the course upon which the current three-branch system of federal government is based. George Washington is perhaps the one person who can most claim the title of Found[MORE]

ARTICLE: Equal Protection, the US Consitition, and the George Washington Connection


Whenever laws aren't explicitly stipulated in the American Constitution (and when it comes to constitutional law, nothing is explicit), each state takes advantage of the wiggle room to create and maintain its own legal code. Although this gives states a lot of leeway in areas, pr[MORE]

ARTICLE: That Something


AMERICA has been different from any other nation on earth. Here is why. The men who cut the pattern for Americans a century and three-quarters ago, held a deep conviction that men-all men-are born with qualities that give them a unique status.[MORE]

ARTICLE: The First Leftist


Our founding fathers, along with the first Leftists who were of the same political faith, were well aware that individual freedom and personal responsibility for one's own welfare are equal and inseparable parts of the same truth. They knew that history amply supports this tru[MORE]

ARTICLE: The American Constitution and Its Critics


The American constitution is one of the most successful constitutions in the world however there has been some serious criticism of it over the years. Critics argue that it is undemocratic, places too many restrictions on government and is too vague in nature.[MORE]

ARTICLE: The Secret History of Firearms


The eighth-grade students gathering on the west lawn of the state capitol in Sacramento were planning to lunch on fried chicken with California's new governor, Ronald Reagan, and then tour the granite building constructed a century earlier to resemble the nation's Capitol. But th[MORE]

ARTICLE: Declaration of Independence - What It Means Now


The following is last chapter in a book called, “The Story of the Declaration of Independence”. Malone, Dumas (1954) The Story of the Declaration of Independence, New York: Oxford University Press. This chapter is found on pages 266-268 and is included in its entirety below[MORE]

ARTICLE: Analysis and Effect of the Declaration of Independence


The Declaration may be divided into three parts, and it put an end to the inconsistency of the colonial position.[MORE]

ARTICLE: Liberalism Stands for Freedom


THE story about the Grand Inquisitor in Dostoevsky's novel, The Brothers Karamazov, pictures Christ as appearing in the streets of Seville during the Spanish Inquisition just as a large number of heretics had been burned at the stake. The Grand Inquisitor arrested Christ, visited[MORE]

FILE: Dissertation on first-principles of government


There is no subject in which mankind are more universally interested than in the subject of government. His security, be he rich or poor, [MORE]

BOOK: The Great Prologue


"This great American nation the Almighty raised up by the power of his omnipotent hand, that it might be possible in the latter days for the kingdom of God to be established in the earth. "If the Lord had not prepared the way by laying the foundations of this glorious nation, [MORE]

BOOK: The Five Thousand Year Leap: 28 Great Ideas That Changed the World


The Five Thousand Year Leap will take you by the hand as you discover the ideals of the Founding Fathers and their 28 principles for success. The values explored in detail by Dr. Skousen range from the Founder's prerequisite that the Constitution was designed for a moral people, [MORE]

BOOK: America's Godly Heritage


America's Godly Heritage clearly sets forth the beliefs of many famous Founding Fathers concerning the proper role of Christian principles in education, government, and the public affairs of the nation. The beliefs of Founders such as Patrick Henry, John Quincy Adams, John Jay, G[MORE]

BOOK: The Selected Political Writings of John Locke


His political thought inspired and helped to justify the American Revolution and deeply influenced the American constitution, and his arguments in favor of human rights, political equality, and government by consent are now accepted worldwide.[MORE]

BOOK: The Federalist Papers


Written at a time when furious arguments were raging about the best way to govern America, "The Federalist Papers" had the immediate practical aim of persuading New Yorkers to accept the newly drafted Constitution in 1787. In this they were supremely successful, but their influen[MORE]

Quote 66 details Share on Google+ - Quote 66 Linked In Share Button - Quote 66 Each individual of the society has a right to be protected by it in the enjoyment of his life, liberty, and property, according to standing laws. He is obliged, consequently, to contribute his share to the expense of this protection; and to give his personal service, or an equivalent, when necessary. But no part of the property of any individual can, with justice, be taken from him, or applied to public uses, without his own consent, or that of the representative body of the people. In fine, the people of this commonwealth are not controllable by any other laws than those to which their constitutional representative body have given their consent.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 62 details Share on Google+ - Quote 62 Linked In Share Button - Quote 62 As good government is an empire of laws, how shall your laws be made? In a large society, inhabiting an extensive country, it is impossible that the whole should assemble to make laws. The first necessary step, then, is to depute power from the many to a few of the most wise and good.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 61 details Share on Google+ - Quote 61 Linked In Share Button - Quote 61 A constitution founded on these principles introduces knowledge among the people, and inspires them with a conscious dignity becoming freemen; a general emulation takes place, which causes good humor, sociability, good manners, and good morals to be general. That elevation of sentiment inspired by such a government, makes the common people brave and enterprising. That ambition which is inspired by it makes them sober, industrious, and frugal.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 56 details Share on Google+ - Quote 56 Linked In Share Button - Quote 56 If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them, they must become happy.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Thomas Cooper, 29 November 1802

Quote 55 details Share on Google+ - Quote 55 Linked In Share Button - Quote 55 When all government, domestic and foreign, in little as in great things, shall be drawn to Washington as the center of all power, it will render powerless the checks provided of one government on another, and will become as venal and oppressive as the government from which we separated."

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Charles Hammond, 1821

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But a Constitution of Government once changed from Freedom, can never be restored. Liberty, once lost, is lost forever.


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Fear is the foundation of most governments; but it is so sordid and brutal a passion, and renders men in whose breasts it predominates so stupid and miserable, that Americans will not be likely to approve of any political institution which is founded on it.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

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Government is instituted for the common good; for the protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness of the people; and not for profit, honor, or private interest of any one man, family, or class of men; therefore, the people alone have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to institute government; and to reform, alter, or totally change the same, when their protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness require it.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 72 details Share on Google+ - Quote 72 Linked In Share Button - Quote 72 Human government is more or less perfect as it approaches nearer or diverges farther from the imitation of this perfect plan of divine and moral government.

John Adams: draft of a Newspaper Communication, Circa August 1770



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