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Quote 1089 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1089 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1089 My Situation is rather unlucky in A Government very deficient in its Laws and those greatly relaxed in their Execution, A Legislature as yet incompleat and not disposed to unite and give Aid to the executive Authority.

George Read: letter to George Washington, February 5 1778

Quote 1098 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1098 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1098 The right of voting for representatives is the primary right by which other rights are protected. To take away this right is to reduce a man to slavery, for slavery consists in being subject to the will of another, and he that has not a vote in the election of representatives is in this case.

Thomas Paine: Dissertation on First Principles of Government
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 1104 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1104 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1104 I return your Excellency Thanks for your Polite Congratulation on my Appointment to the Government of this State, and shall be happy if by my Exertions in my Department I shall be able to contribute to the general Interest and Welfare of the United States.

William Paca: letter to George Washington, April 25, 1783

Quote 1122 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1122 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1122 those principles of liberty are as unalterable as human nature and our terrestrial, mundane system. I could, therefore, safely say, consistently with all my then and present information, that I believed they would never make discoveries in contradiction to these general principles. In favor of these general principles, in philosophy, religion, and government, I could fill sheets of quotations from Frederic of Prussia, from Hume, Gibbon, Bolingbroke, Rousseau, and Voltaire, as well as Newton and Locke; not to mention thousands of divines and philosophers of inferior fame.

John Adams: letter to Thomas Jefferson June 28, 1813

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Every society, all government, and every kind of civil compact therefore, is or ought to be, calculated for the general good and safety of the community.

George Mason: remarks on Annual Elections for the Fairfax Independent Company, April 1775

Quote 1163 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1163 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1163 They will always claim a right of using and enjoying the fruits of their honest industry, unrestrained by any ideal principles of government, and will gather estates for themselves and children without regarding the whimsical impropriety of being richer than their neighbors. These are rights which freemen will never consent to relinquish, and after fighting for deliverance from one species of tyranny, it would be unreasonable to expect they should tamely acquiesce under another.

Carter Braxton: May 1776 - address to the Convention of the Colony and Ancient Dominion of Virginia

Quote 1164 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1164 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1164 The truth is that men will not be poor from choice or compulsion, and these governments can exist only in countries where the people are so from necessity. In all others they have ceased almost as soon as erected, and in many instances been succeeded by despotism, and the arbitrary sway of some usurper, who had before perhaps gained the confidence of the people, by eulogiums on liberty, and possessing no property of his own, by most disinterestedly opposing depredations on that of his neighbors.

Carter Braxton: May 1776 - address to the Convention of the Colony and Ancient Dominion of Virginia

Quote 1165 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1165 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1165 T]he government must be a weak one indeed, if it should forget that the good of the whole can only be promoted by advancing the good of each of the parts or members which compose the whole.

John Jay: Federalist No 64, 1788
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 1166 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1166 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1166 I think we have more machinery of government than is necessary, too many parasites living on the labor of the industrious.

Thomas Jefferson: to William Ludlow, September 6, 1824

Quote 1169 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1169 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1169 Nothing is more dreaded than the national government meddling with religion.


Quote 1171 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1171 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1171 The more I have reflected on the subject, the better satisfied I am of the impolicy of assuming the state debts. The diminishing the necessity for State taxation will undoubtedly leave the national government more at liberty to exercise its powers and encrease the subjects on which it will act, for that purpose, and if that were absolutely a necessary power of the government, and no objections applied to the transfer itself of the publick creditors from one government to the other, without their consent, (for such a modification as leaves them not even a plausible alternative, amounts to the same thing, and such I understand the report to be) or to the probable inefficiency of the national government comparatively with those of the States in raising the necessary funds, I should perhaps have no objections to it at present.


Quote 1173 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1173 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1173 The judiciary of the United States is the subtle corps of sappers and miners constantly working under ground to undermine the foundations of our confederated fabric. They are construing our constitution from a co-ordination of a general and special government to a general and supreme one alone.


Quote 1174 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1174 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1174 My Observations upon the misery which a single legislature has produced in Pennsylvania, have only served to encrease my Abhorance of that Species of Government. I could as soon embrace the most absurd dogmas in the most Absurd of all the pagan religions, as prostitute my Understanding by approving of our State constitution—It is below a democracy. It is mobocracy—if you will allow me to coin a word.


Quote 1180 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1180 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1180 It may be laid down, as a primary position, and the basis of our system, that every citizen who enjoys the
protection of a free government, owes not only a proportion of his property, but even of his personal
services to the defence of it, and consequently that the Citizens of America (with a few legal and official
exceptions) from 18 to 50 Years of Age should be borne on the Militia Rolls, provided with uniform
Arms, and so far accustomed to the use of them, that the Total strength of the Country might be called
forth at Short Notice on any very interesting Emergency.

George Washington: letter to Alexander Hamilton (2 May 1783)

Quote 1193 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1193 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1193 Emigrants will bring with them the principles of the governments they leave, imbibed in their early youth; or, if able to throw off, it will be in exchange for an unbounded licentiousness, passing, as is usual, from one extreme to another. It would be a miracle were they to stop precisely at the point of temperate liberty.


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If they have real grievances redress them, if possible; or acknowledge the justice of them, and your inability to do it at the moment. If they have not, employ the force of government against them at once.

George Washington: letter to Henry Lee, October 31, 1786

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There is danger from all men. The only maxim of a free government ought to be to trust no man living with power to danger the public liberty.


Quote 1204 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1204 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1204 The hand of the people has given the mortal blow to a conspiracy, which, in other countries would have called for an appeal to armies; and has proved that government to be the strongest of which every man feels himself a part. It is a happy illustration too of the importance of preserving to the state authorities all that vigour which the constitution foresaw would be necessary, not only for their own safety, but for that of the whole.


Quote 1205 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1205 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1205 Should an unwarrantable measure of the federal government be unpopular in particular States, which would seldom fail to be the case, or even a warrantable measure be so, which may sometimes be the case, the means of opposition to it are powerful and at hand. The disquietude of the people; their repugnance and, perhaps refusal to cooperate with officers of the Union, the frowns of the executive magistracy of the State; the embarrassment created by legislative devices, which would often be added on such occasions, would oppose, in any State, very serious impediments; and were the sentiments of several adjoining States happen to be in Union, would present obstructions which the federal government would hardly be willing to encounter.


Quote 1208 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1208 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1208 Is it not certain that government would be weak and irregular, and that the people would be poor and contemptible? And still it must be allowed, that each town would entirely surrender its boasted independence if they should unite in State government, and would retain only about one-eightieth part of the administration of their own affairs.

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Nov 14, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 1363 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1363 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1363 The government is, or ought to be insituted for the common benefit, protection, and security of the people, nation or community ... and that when any government shall be found inadequate or contrary to these purposes, a majority of the community hath an indubitable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to reform, alter or abolish it, in such manner as shall be judged conducive to the publick weal.

George Mason: First draft, Virginia Declaration of Rights, June 12, 1776
The Quotable Founding Fathers

Quote 1218 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1218 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1218 It appears to me the senate is the most important branch in the government, for aiding and supporting the executive, securing the rights of the individual states, the government of the United States, and the liberties of the people. The executive magistrate is to execute the laws. The senate, being a branch of the legislature, will naturally incline to have them duly executed, and, therefore, will advise to such appointments as will best attain that end.

Roger Sherman: letter to John Adams, July 1789

Quote 1219 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1219 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1219 If the president alone was vested with the power of appointing all officers, and was left to select a council for himself, he would be liable to be deceived by flatterers and pretenders to patriotism, who would have no motive but their own emolument. They would wish to extend the powers of the executive to increase their own importance; and, however upright he might be in his intentions, there would be great danger of his being misled, even to the subversion of the constitution, or, at least, to introduce such evils as to interrupt the harmony of the government, and deprive him of the confidence of the people.

Roger Sherman: letter to John Adams, July 1789

Quote 1246 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1246 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1246 We will look for the permanency and stability of our new government to Him who bringeth princes to nothing and teacheth senators wisdom.

John Hart: address from John Hart, October 5, 1776

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Public officials may have to live in a splendor unsuited to new republics groaning under financial burdens; private individuals fleeing from the tyranny of old governments are in a different position, however.

James Smith: letter to the American Commissioners, Aug 24, 1778.
Web Source: http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Franklin/01-27-02-0269



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