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Quote 79 details Share on Google+ - Quote 79 Linked In Share Button - Quote 79 If there is a form of government, then, whose principle and foundation is virtue, will not every sober man acknowledge it better calculated to promote the general happiness than any other form?

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 81 details Share on Google+ - Quote 81 Linked In Share Button - Quote 81 It already appears, that there must be in every society of men superiors and inferiors, because God has laid in the constitution and course of nature the foundations of the distinction.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 83 details Share on Google+ - Quote 83 Linked In Share Button - Quote 83 It is the duty of all men in society, publicly, and at stated seasons, to worship the SUPREME BEING, the great Creator and Preserver of the universe. And no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained, in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping GOD in the manner most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience; or for his religious profession or sentiments; provided he doth not disturb the public peace, or obstruct others in their religious worship.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 86 details Share on Google+ - Quote 86 Linked In Share Button - Quote 86 Laws for the liberal education of the youth, especially of the lower class of the people, are so extremely wise and useful, that, to a humane and generous mind, no expense for this purpose would be thought extravagant.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 94 details Share on Google+ - Quote 94 Linked In Share Button - Quote 94 Public virtue cannot exist in a nation without private, and public virtue is the only foundation of republics. There must be a positive passion for the public good, the public interest, honour, power and glory, established in the minds of the people, or there can be no republican government, nor any real liberty: and this public passion must be superior to all private passions.

John Adams: letter to Mercy Warren, April 16, 1776

Quote 96 details Share on Google+ - Quote 96 Linked In Share Button - Quote 96 That, as a republic is the best of governments, so that particular arrangements of the powers of society, or, in other words, that form of government which is best contrived to secure an impartial and exact execution of the laws, is the best of republics.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 98 details Share on Google+ - Quote 98 Linked In Share Button - Quote 98 The dignity and stability of government in all its branches, the morals of the people, and every blessing of society depend so much upon an upright and skillful administration of justice, that the judicial power ought to be distinct from both the legislative and executive, and independent upon both, that so it may be a check upon both, and both should be checks upon that.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 101 details Share on Google+ - Quote 101 Linked In Share Button - Quote 101 The only foundation of a free Constitution, is pure Virtue, and if this cannot be inspired into our People, in a great Measure, than they have it now. They may change their Rulers, and the forms of Government, but they will not obtain a lasting Liberty.

John Adams: letter to Zabdiel Adams, June 21, 1776

Quote 102 details Share on Google+ - Quote 102 Linked In Share Button - Quote 102 The rich, the well-born, and the able, acquire and influence among the people that will soon be too much for simple honesty and plain sense, in a house of representatives. The most illustrious of them must, therefore, be separated from the mass, and placed by themselves in a senate; this is, to all honest and useful intents, an ostracism.

John Adams: A Defense of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America, vol 1, 1787
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 103 details Share on Google+ - Quote 103 Linked In Share Button - Quote 103 There is no good government but what is republican. That the only valuable part of the British constitution is so; for the true idea of a republic is "an empire of laws, and not of men." That, as a republic is the best of governments, so that particular arrangement of the powers of society, or in other words, that form of government which is best contrived to secure an impartial and exact execution of the law, is the best of republics.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 104 details Share on Google+ - Quote 104 Linked In Share Button - Quote 104 They define a republic to be a government of laws, and not of men.


Quote 105 details Share on Google+ - Quote 105 Linked In Share Button - Quote 105 To suppose arms in the hands of citizens, to be used at individual discretion, except in private self-defense, or by partial orders of towns, counties or districts of a state, is to demolish every constitution, and lay the laws prostrate, so that liberty can be enjoyed by no man; it is a dissolution of the government. The fundamental law of the militia is, that it be created, directed and commanded by the laws, and ever for the support of the laws.

John Adams: A Defense of the Constitutions of the United States, 1787-1788

Quote 106 details Share on Google+ - Quote 106 Linked In Share Button - Quote 106 Upon this point all speculative politicians will agree, that the happiness of society is the end of government, as all divines and moral philosophers will agree that the happiness of the individual is the end of man. From this principle it will follow that the form of government which communicates ease, comfort, security, or, in one word, happiness, to the greatest numbers of persons, and in the greatest degree, is the best.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 107 details Share on Google+ - Quote 107 Linked In Share Button - Quote 107 We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion. Avarice, ambition, revenge, or gallantry, would break the strongest cords of our Constitution as a whale goes through a net. Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.

John Adams: Address to the Military, October 11, 1798

Quote 108 details Share on Google+ - Quote 108 Linked In Share Button - Quote 108 We ought to consider what is the end of government before we determine which is the best form. Upon this point all speculative politicians will agree that the happiness of society is the end of government, as all divines and moral philosophers will agree that the happiness of the individual is the end of man....All sober inquirers after truth, ancient and modern, pagan and Christian, have declared that the happiness of man, as well as his dignity, consists in virtue.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 110 details Share on Google+ - Quote 110 Linked In Share Button - Quote 110 Wisdom and knowledge, as well as virtue, diffused generally among the body of the people, being necessary for the preservation of their rights and liberties, and as these depend on spreading the opportunities and advantages of education in the various parts of the country, and among the different orders of people, it shall be the duty of legislators and magistrates... to cherish the interest of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries of them.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 112 details Share on Google+ - Quote 112 Linked In Share Button - Quote 112 [J]udges, therefore, should be always men of learning and experience in the laws, of exemplary morals, great patience, calmness, coolness, and attention. Their minds should not be distracted with jarring interests; they should not be dependent upon any man, or body of men.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 119 details Share on Google+ - Quote 119 Linked In Share Button - Quote 119 A feeble executive implies a feeble execution of the government. A feeble execution is but another phrase for a bad execution; and a government ill executed, whatever may be its theory, must be, in practice, a bad government.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 70, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 121 details Share on Google+ - Quote 121 Linked In Share Button - Quote 121 A government ought to contain in itself every power requisite to the full accomplishment of the objects committed to its care, and to the complete execution of the trusts for which it is responsible, free from every other control but a regard to the public good and to the sense of the people.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 31, January 1, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 125 details Share on Google+ - Quote 125 Linked In Share Button - Quote 125 As to Taxes, they are evidently inseparable from Government. It is impossible without them to pay the debts of the nation, to protect it from foreign danger, or to secure individuals from lawless violence and rapine.

Alexander Hamilton: Address to the Electors of the State of New York, March, 1801

Quote 126 details Share on Google+ - Quote 126 Linked In Share Button - Quote 126 But as the plan of the convention aims only at a partial union or consolidation, the State governments would clearly retain all the rights of sovereignty which they before had, and which were not, by that act, EXCLUSIVELY delegated to the United States.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 32, January 3, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 127 details Share on Google+ - Quote 127 Linked In Share Button - Quote 127 Constitutions of civil government are not to be framed upon a calculation of existing exigencies, but upon a combination of these with the probable exigencies of ages, according to the natural and tried course of human affairs. Nothing, therefore, can be more fallacious than to infer the extent of any power, proper to be lodged in the national government, from an estimate of its immediate necessities.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 34, January 4, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 128 details Share on Google+ - Quote 128 Linked In Share Button - Quote 128 Energy in the executive is a leading character in the definition of good government. It is essential to the protection of the community against foreign attacks; it is not less essential to the steady administration of the laws; to the protection of property against those irregular and high-handed combinations which sometimes interrupt the ordinary course of justice; to the security of liberty against the enterprises and assaults of ambition, of faction, and of anarchy.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 69, March 14, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 131 details Share on Google+ - Quote 131 Linked In Share Button - Quote 131 Good constitutions are formed upon a comparison of the liberty of the individual with the strength of government: If the tone of either be too high, the other will be weakened too much. It is the happiest possible mode of conciliating these objects, to institute one branch peculiarly endowed with sensibility, another with knowledge and firmness. Through the opposition and mutual control of these bodies, the government will reach, in its regular operations, the perfect balance between liberty and power.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 25, 1788

Quote 132 details Share on Google+ - Quote 132 Linked In Share Button - Quote 132 Government implies the power of making laws. It is essential to the idea of a law, that it be attended with a sanction; or, in other words, a penalty or punishment for disobedience.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 15, 1787
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers



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