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Quote 134 details Share on Google+ - Quote 134 Linked In Share Button - Quote 134 I am persuaded that a firm union is as necessary to perpetuate our liberties as it is to make us respectable; and experience will probably prove that the National Government will be as natural a guardian of our freedom as the State Legislatures.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 137 details Share on Google+ - Quote 137 Linked In Share Button - Quote 137 I trust that the proposed Constitution afford a genuine specimen of representative government and republican government; and that it will answer, in an eminent degree, all the beneficial purposes of society.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 138 details Share on Google+ - Quote 138 Linked In Share Button - Quote 138 I will venture to assert that no combination of designing men under heaven will be capable of making a government unpopular which is in its principles a wise and good one, and vigorous in its operations.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 140 details Share on Google+ - Quote 140 Linked In Share Button - Quote 140 It has been thought a dangerous thing in any stat to stop up the vent of griefs. Wise governments have therefore generally received petitions with some indulgence, even when but slightly founded.

Benjamin Franklin: Letter to Thomas Cushing (15 Feb. 1774)

Quote 142 details Share on Google+ - Quote 142 Linked In Share Button - Quote 142 A primary object should be the education of our youth in the science of government. In a republic, what species of knowledge can be equally important? And what duty more pressing... than ... communicating it to those who are to be the future guardians of the liberties of the country?

George Washington: A primary object should be the education of our youth in the science of government.

Quote 144 details Share on Google+ - Quote 144 Linked In Share Button - Quote 144 If a well-regulated militia be the most natural defense of a free country, it ought certainly to be under the regulation and at the disposal of that body which is constituted the guardian of the national security. If standing armies are dangerous to liberty, an efficacious power over the militia in the same body ought, as far as possible, to take away the inducement and the pretext to such unfriendly institutions. If the federal government can command the aid of the militia in those emergencies which call for the military arm in support of the civil magistrate, it can the better dispense with the employment of a different kind of force. If it cannot avail itself of the former, it will be obliged to recur to the latter. To render an army unnecessary will be a more certain method of preventing its existence than a thousand prohibitions upon paper.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 29, January 10, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 146 details Share on Google+ - Quote 146 Linked In Share Button - Quote 146 If it be asked, What is the most sacred duty and the greatest source of our security in a Republic? The answer would be, An inviolable respect for the Constitution and Laws — the first growing out of the last.... A sacred respect for the constitutional law is the vital principle, the sustaining energy of a free government.

Alexander Hamilton: Essay in the American Daily Advertiser, Aug 28, 1794

Quote 147 details Share on Google+ - Quote 147 Linked In Share Button - Quote 147 If mankind were to resolve to agree in no institution of government, until every part of it had been adjusted to the most exact standard of perfection, society would soon become a general scene of anarchy, and the world a desert.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 65, March 7, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 148 details Share on Google+ - Quote 148 Linked In Share Button - Quote 148 If the federal government should overpass the just bounds of its authority and make a tyrannical use of its powers, the people, whose creature it is, must appeal to the standard they have formed, and take such measures to redress the injury done to the Constitution as the exigency may suggest and prudence justify.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 33, January 3, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 156 details Share on Google+ - Quote 156 Linked In Share Button - Quote 156 It is an unquestionable truth, that the body of the people in every country desire sincerely its prosperity. But it is equally unquestionable that they do not possess the discernment and stability necessary for systematic government. To deny that they are frequently led into the grossest of errors, by misinformation and passion, would be a flattery which their own good sense must despise.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the Ratifying Convention of New York, June, 1788

Quote 158 details Share on Google+ - Quote 158 Linked In Share Button - Quote 158 It is one thing to be subordinate to the laws, and another [for the Executive] to be dependent on the legislative body. The first comports with, the last violates, the fundamental principles of good government; and, whatever may be the forms of the Constitution, unites all power in the same hands.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 71, March 18, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 159 details Share on Google+ - Quote 159 Linked In Share Button - Quote 159 It seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend for their political constitutions on accident and force. If there be any truth in the remark, the crisis at which we are arrived may with propriety be regarded as the era in which that decision is to be made; and a wrong election of the part we shall act may, in this view, deserve to be considered as the general misfortune of mankind.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 1, October 27, 1787
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 165 details Share on Google+ - Quote 165 Linked In Share Button - Quote 165 Government is not reason, it is not eloquence, it is force. Like fire it is a dangerous servant and a fearsome master."


Quote 929 details Share on Google+ - Quote 929 Linked In Share Button - Quote 929 The Science of Government it is my Duty to study, more than all other Sciences: the Art of Legislation and Administration and Negotiation, out to take Place, indeed to exclude in a manner all other arts. I must study Politicks and War that my sons my have liberty to study mathematicks and Philosophy. My sons out to study Mathematicks and Philosophy, geography, natural History, Naval Architecture, navigation, commerce and Agriculture, in order to give their Children a right to study Painting, Poetry, Musick, Architecture, Statuary, Tapestry, and Porcelaine.


Quote 180 details Share on Google+ - Quote 180 Linked In Share Button - Quote 180 No government, any more than an individual, will long be respected without being truly respectable; nor be truly respectable, without possessing a certain portion of order and stability.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 62, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 182 details Share on Google+ - Quote 182 Linked In Share Button - Quote 182 Of all the cares or concerns of government, the direction of war most peculiarly demands those qualities which distinguish the exercise of power by a single hand. The direction of war implies the direction of the common strength; and the power of directing and employing the common strength, forms a usual and essential part in the definition of the executive authority.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 74, March 25, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 188 details Share on Google+ - Quote 188 Linked In Share Button - Quote 188 The citizens of America have too much discernment to be argued into anarchy. and I am much mistaken if experience has not wrought a deep and solemn conviction in the public mind that greater energy of government is essential to the welfare and prosperity of the community.


Quote 192 details Share on Google+ - Quote 192 Linked In Share Button - Quote 192 The great leading objects of the federal government, in which revenue is concerned, are to maintain domestic peace, and provide for the common defense. In these are comprehended the regulation of commerce that is, the whole system of foreign intercourse; the support of armies and navies, and of the civil administration.

Alexander Hamilton: Remarks in the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 197 details Share on Google+ - Quote 197 Linked In Share Button - Quote 197 The instrument by which it [government] must act are either the AUTHORITY of the laws or FORCE. If the first be destroyed, the last must be substituted; and where this becomes the ordinary instrument of government there is an end to liberty!

Alexander Hamilton: Tully, No. 3, August 28, 1794

Quote 201 details Share on Google+ - Quote 201 Linked In Share Button - Quote 201 The proposed Constitution, so far from implying an abolition of the State governments, makes them constituent parts of the national sovereignty, by allowing them a direct representation in the Senate, and leaves in their possession certain exclusive and very important portions of sovereign power. This fully corresponds, in every rational import of the terms, with the idea of a federal government.


Quote 204 details Share on Google+ - Quote 204 Linked In Share Button - Quote 204 The regular distribution of power into distinct departments; the introduction of legislative balances and checks; the institution of courts composed of judges holding their offices during good behavior; the representation of the people in the legislature by deputies of their own election... They are means, and powerful means, by which the excellences of republican government may be retained and its imperfections lessened or avoided.


Quote 208 details Share on Google+ - Quote 208 Linked In Share Button - Quote 208 The standard of good behavior for the continuance in office of the judicial magistracy is certainly one of the most valuable of the modern improvements in the practice of government.

Alexander Hamilton: deralist No. 78, 1788

Quote 209 details Share on Google+ - Quote 209 Linked In Share Button - Quote 209 The State governments possess inherent advantages, which will ever give them an influence and ascendancy over the National Government, and will for ever preclude the possibility of federal encroachments. That their liberties, indeed, can be subverted by the federal head, is repugnant to every rule of political calculation.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 17, 1788

Quote 211 details Share on Google+ - Quote 211 Linked In Share Button - Quote 211 The true principle of government is this — make the system compleat in its structure; give a perfect proportion and balance to its parts; and the powers you give it will never affect your security.

Alexander Hamilton: Remarks in the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 213 details Share on Google+ - Quote 213 Linked In Share Button - Quote 213 There are certain social principles in human nature, from which we may draw the most solid conclusions with respect to the conduct of individuals and of communities. We love our families more than our neighbors; we love our neighbors more than our countrymen in general. The human affections, like solar heat, lose their intensity as they depart from the centre... On these principles, the attachment of the individual will be first and for ever secured by the State governments. They will be a mutual protection and support.

Alexander Hamilton: speech at the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788



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