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Quote 854 details Share on Google+ - Quote 854 Linked In Share Button - Quote 854 Life is of no value but as it brings us gratifications. Among the most valuable of these is rational society. It informs the mind, sweetens the temper, cheers our spirits, and promotes health.

Thomas Jefferson: Letter to James Madison, February 20, 1784

Quote 862 details Share on Google+ - Quote 862 Linked In Share Button - Quote 862 He [John Adams] is vain, irritable, and a bad calculator of the force and probable effect of the motives which govern men. This is all the ill which can possibly be said of him. He is as disinterested as the Being who made him.

Quote 878 details Share on Google+ - Quote 878 Linked In Share Button - Quote 878 Complaints ill become those who are found to be the first aggressors.

George Washington: to James Madison, March 21, 1787

Quote 930 details Share on Google+ - Quote 930 Linked In Share Button - Quote 930 Learned Institutions ought to be favorite objects with every free people. They throw that light over the public mind which is the best security against crafty & dangerous encroachments on the public liberty.

James Madison: letter to W. T. Barry, August 4, 1822 (Inscribed in the Madison memorial Hall, Library of Congress James Madison Memorial Building.)
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 963 details Share on Google+ - Quote 963 Linked In Share Button - Quote 963
I think our governments will remain virtuous for many centuries; as long as they are chiefly agricultural; and this will be as long as there shall be vacant lands in any part of America. When they get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, they will become corrupt as in Europe.


Quote 1067 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1067 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1067 The commencement of your Administration has been as propitious as could have been reasonably expected, in a nation composed of not the wisest and best men in the world. You are sufficiently acquainted with the people you rule, to know, that little praise, but much unmerited censure is to be expected from them: An Angel from heaven could not command an universal approbation.

Thomas McKean: letter to James Madison, 3 February 1810

Quote 1074 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1074 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1074 Burr has been held to bail in the sum of $10,000. on the charge of preparing & setting on foot an expedition against Mexico. The C. Justice stated that there was sufficient evidence of Burr’s treasonable intentions, but not of an actual assemblage of men & that at the ensuing term, if that fact would be established, an indictment might be found against him for treason, when he appeared in obedience to his recognizance.

Caesar Rodney: letter to James Madison, April 1, 1807

Quote 1075 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1075 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1075 I have supposed that a provision in our laws, positively adopting this principle of the common law, to a correct extent, was very much to be desired, as you know we have always disputed the existence of a Common law jurisdiction in the Courts of the United States.

Caesar Rodney: letter to James Madison, January 12, 1808

Quote 1090 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1090 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1090 I beg leave to offer you my resignation of the office of Attorney of the United States for Delaware District--which I have the honor to request your acceptance of. I have the honour to be with the highest consideration and respect Your obedt. servt.

George Read: letter to James Madison, November 25, 1815

Quote 1097 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1097 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1097
The happy Union of these States is a wonder; their Constitution a miracle; their example the hope of Liberty throughout the world.

James Madison: Outline notes, September 1829 - inscribed in the Madison Memorial Hall, Library of Congress James Madison Memorial Building.
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 1115 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1115 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1115 Before any man can be considered as a member of Civil Society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governor of the Universe: And if a member of Civil Society, who enters into any subordinate Association, must always do it with a reservation of his duty to the general authority; much more must every man who becomes a member of any particular Civil Society, do it with a saving of his allegiance to the Universal Sovereign.

James Madison: James Madison, Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments (1785)
For God and Country (T.K. Marion)

Quote 1221 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1221 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1221
Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

Translation: I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.


Quote 1258 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1258 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1258 A bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on Earth.


Quote 1267 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1267 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1267 Books constitute capital. A library book lasts as long as a house, for hundreds of years. it is not, then, an article of mere consumption but fairly of capital, and often in the case of professional men, setting out in life, it is their only capital.

Quote 1299 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1299 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1299 Louis XIV, having established the Coutumes de Paris as the law of Louisiana, this was not changed by the mere act of transfer; on the contrary, the laws of France continued and continues to be the law of the land, except where specially altered by some subsequent edict of Spain or act of Congress.

Quote 1310 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1310 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1310 I acknowledge the right of voluntary associations for laudable purposes and in moderate numbers. I acknowledge, too, the expediency for revolutionary purposes of general associations coextensive with the nation. But where, as in our case, no abuses call for revolution, voluntary associations so extensive as to grapple with and control the government, should such be or become their purpose, are dangerous machines and should be frowned down in every well regulated government.




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