Site Search for: JEFFERSON

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Quote 77 details Share on Google+ - Quote 77 Linked In Share Button - Quote 77 I think he [Jefferson] had one more vote than any other, and that placed him at the head of the committee. I had the next highest number, and that placed me second. The committee met, discussed the subject, [of the Declaration of Independence] and then appointed Mr. Jefferson and me to make the draught, I suppose because we were the two first on the list. The subcommittee met. Jefferson proposed to me to make the draught. Adams: I will not. Jefferson: You should do it. Adams: Oh! no. Jefferson Why will you not? You ought to do it. Adams: I will not. Jefferson: Why? Adams: Reasons enough. Jefferson: What can be your reasons?

John Adams: to Thomas Jefferson concerning the drafting of the Declaration, June 1775

Quote 93 details Share on Google+ - Quote 93 Linked In Share Button - Quote 93 Public affairs go on pretty much as usual: perpetual chicanery and rather more personal abuse than there used to be... Our American Chivalry is the worst in the world. It has no Laws, no bounds, no definitions; it seems to be all a Caprice.

John Adams: letter to Thomas Jefferson, April 17, 1826

Quote 258 details Share on Google+ - Quote 258 Linked In Share Button - Quote 258 Determine never to be idle. No person will have occasion to complain of the want of time, who never loses any. It is wonderful how much may be done, if we are always doing. And that you may be always doing good, my dear, is the ardent prayer of yours affectionately.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Martha Jefferson, May 5, 1787

Quote 286 details Share on Google+ - Quote 286 Linked In Share Button - Quote 286 Harmony in the married state is the very first object to be aimed at

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Mary Jefferson Eppes, January 7, 1798

Quote 290 details Share on Google+ - Quote 290 Linked In Share Button - Quote 290 His mind was great and powerful, without being of the very first order; his penetration strong, though not so acute as that of Newton, Bacon, or Locke; and as far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder

Thomas Jefferson: on Thomas Jefferson in a letter to Dr. Walter Jones, January 2, 1814

Quote 291 details Share on Google+ - Quote 291 Linked In Share Button - Quote 291 His person, you know, was fine, his stature exactly what one would wish, his deportment easy, erect and noble.

Thomas Jefferson: on Thomas Jefferson in a letter to Dr. Walter Jones, January 2, 1814

Quote 327 details Share on Google+ - Quote 327 Linked In Share Button - Quote 327 He was certainly one of the most learned men of the age. It may be said of him as has been said of others that he was a "walking Library," and what can be said of but few such prodigies, that the Genius of Philosophy ever walked hand in hand with him.

James Madison: Thomas Jefferson in a letter to Samuel Harrison Smith, November 4, 1826

Quote 338 details Share on Google+ - Quote 338 Linked In Share Button - Quote 338 In forming the Senate, the great anchor of the Government, the questions as they came within the first object turned mostly on the mode of appointment, and the duration of it.

James Madison: letter to Thomas Jefferson, October 24, 1787

Quote 357 details Share on Google+ - Quote 357 Linked In Share Button - Quote 357 On the distinctive principles of the Government ... of the U. States, the best guides are to be found in... The Declaration of Independence, as the fundamental Act of Union of these States.

James Madison: letter to Thomas Jefferson, February 8, 1825

Quote 372 details Share on Google+ - Quote 372 Linked In Share Button - Quote 372 The great desideratum in Government is, so to modify the sovereignty as that it may be sufficiently neutral between different parts of the Society to control one part from invading the rights of another, and at the same time sufficiently controlled itself, from setting up an interest adverse to that of the entire Society.

James Madison: letter to Thomas Jefferson, October 24, 1787

Quote 374 details Share on Google+ - Quote 374 Linked In Share Button - Quote 374 The invasion of private rights is chiefly to be apprehended, not from acts of Government contrary to the sense of its constituents, but from acts in which the Government is the mere instrument of the major number of the Constituents.

James Madison: letter to Thomas Jefferson, October 17, 1788

Quote 396 details Share on Google+ - Quote 396 Linked In Share Button - Quote 396 Wherever the real power in a Government lies, there is the danger of oppression

James Madison: letter to Thomas Jefferson, October 17, 1788

Quote 399 details Share on Google+ - Quote 399 Linked In Share Button - Quote 399 [He] will live in the memory and gratitude of the wise & good, as a luminary of Science, as a votary of liberty, as a model of patriotism, and as a benefactor of human kind.

James Madison: on Thomas Jefferson in a letter to Nicholas P. Trist, July 6, 1826

Quote 723 details Share on Google+ - Quote 723 Linked In Share Button - Quote 723 I am retired to Monticello, where, in the bosom of my family, and surrounded by my books, I enjoy a repose to which I have been long a stranger.

Thomas Jefferson: Thomas Jefferson, Letter to Tadeusz Kościuszko, February 26, 1810

Quote 804 details Share on Google+ - Quote 804 Linked In Share Button - Quote 804 I consider you [John Adams] and him [Thomas Jefferson] as the North and South Poles of the American Revolution. Some talked, some wrote, and some fought to promote and establish it, but you and M.r Jefferson thought for us all. I have never taken a retrospect of the years 1775 and 1776 without associating your opinions and speeches and conversations with all the great political, moral, and intellectual achievements of Congresses of those memorable years.

Benjamin Rush: Letter to John Adams - February 17, 1812

Quote 864 details Share on Google+ - Quote 864 Linked In Share Button - Quote 864 The answers of Mr. Adams [John Adams] to his addressees from the most grotesque scene in the tragic-comedy acting by the government... he is verifying completely the last feature in the character drawn of him by Dr. F [Benjamin Franklin] however his title may stand to the two first. "Always an honest man, often a wise one, but sometimes wholly out of his senses."

James Madison: to Thomas Jefferson, June 10, 1798

Quote 873 details Share on Google+ - Quote 873 Linked In Share Button - Quote 873 If find as I grow older, that I love those most whom I loved first.

Thomas Jefferson: to Mary Jefferson Bolling, July 23, 1787

Quote 897 details Share on Google+ - Quote 897 Linked In Share Button - Quote 897 Ambition is so vigilant, and where it has a model always in view as in the present case, is so prompt in seizing its advantages, that it can not be too closely watched, or to vigorously checked.

James Madison: to Thomas Jefferson, December 25, 1797

Quote 903 details Share on Google+ - Quote 903 Linked In Share Button - Quote 903 Reason first: You are a Virginian and a Virginian out to appear at the head of this business. Reason second: I am obnoxious, suspected and unpopular. You are very much otherwise. Reason third: You can write tem times better than I can.

John Adams: to Thomas Jefferson on Thomas should draft The Declaration of Independence, 1776

Quote 908 details Share on Google+ - Quote 908 Linked In Share Button - Quote 908 I am not an advocate for frequent changes in laws and Constitutions. But laws and institutions must go hand in hand with the progress of the human mind. As that becomes more developed, more enlightened, as new discoveries are made, new truths discovered and manners and opinions change, with the change of circumstances, institutions must advance also to keep pace with the times. We might as well require a man to wear still the coat which fitted him when a boy as civilized society to remain ever under the regimen of their barbarous ancestors.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Samuel Kercheval, July 12, 1816 (Inscription on the southeast quadrant of the Jefferson Memorial, the inscription omits some words without ellipses.)
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Quote 2 details Share on Google+ - Quote 2 Linked In Share Button - Quote 2
All the perplexities, confusions, and distresses in America arise, not from defects in their constitution or confederation, not from a want of honor or virtue, so much as from downright ignorance of the nature of coin, credit, and circulation.


Quote 1006 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1006 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1006 Yes people, sir, is nothing but a great beast!

Alexander Hamilton: political argument with Thomas Jefferson - David S. Muzzey, An American History, p. 192 (1911)
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Quote 1072 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1072 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1072 Few escape from all the storms of life unwrecked; but few are cheered amid the tempest with the hopes of such a haven as that which you have reached.

Arthur Middleton: letter to Thomas Jefferson December 18, 1822

Quote 1073 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1073 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1073 A retirement consecrated to wisdom, and graced by the love of an admiring people. A lot of which kings would envy, if they could appreciate it.

Arthur Middleton: letter to Thomas Jefferson December 18, 1822

Quote 1092 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1092 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1092 I have sometimes asked myself whether my country is the better for my having lived at all? I do not know that it is. I have been the instrument of doing the following things; but they would have been done by others; some of them, perhaps, a little better.



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