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Quote 122 details Share on Google+ - Quote 122 Linked In Share Button - Quote 122 And it proves, in the last place, that liberty can have nothing to fear from the judiciary alone, but would have everything to fear from its union with either of the other departments.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 78, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 128 details Share on Google+ - Quote 128 Linked In Share Button - Quote 128 Energy in the executive is a leading character in the definition of good government. It is essential to the protection of the community against foreign attacks; it is not less essential to the steady administration of the laws; to the protection of property against those irregular and high-handed combinations which sometimes interrupt the ordinary course of justice; to the security of liberty against the enterprises and assaults of ambition, of faction, and of anarchy.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 69, March 14, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 131 details Share on Google+ - Quote 131 Linked In Share Button - Quote 131 Good constitutions are formed upon a comparison of the liberty of the individual with the strength of government: If the tone of either be too high, the other will be weakened too much. It is the happiest possible mode of conciliating these objects, to institute one branch peculiarly endowed with sensibility, another with knowledge and firmness. Through the opposition and mutual control of these bodies, the government will reach, in its regular operations, the perfect balance between liberty and power.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 25, 1788

Quote 144 details Share on Google+ - Quote 144 Linked In Share Button - Quote 144 If a well-regulated militia be the most natural defense of a free country, it ought certainly to be under the regulation and at the disposal of that body which is constituted the guardian of the national security. If standing armies are dangerous to liberty, an efficacious power over the militia in the same body ought, as far as possible, to take away the inducement and the pretext to such unfriendly institutions. If the federal government can command the aid of the militia in those emergencies which call for the military arm in support of the civil magistrate, it can the better dispense with the employment of a different kind of force. If it cannot avail itself of the former, it will be obliged to recur to the latter. To render an army unnecessary will be a more certain method of preventing its existence than a thousand prohibitions upon paper.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 29, January 10, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 929 details Share on Google+ - Quote 929 Linked In Share Button - Quote 929 The Science of Government it is my Duty to study, more than all other Sciences: the Art of Legislation and Administration and Negotiation, out to take Place, indeed to exclude in a manner all other arts. I must study Politicks and War that my sons my have liberty to study mathematicks and Philosophy. My sons out to study Mathematicks and Philosophy, geography, natural History, Naval Architecture, navigation, commerce and Agriculture, in order to give their Children a right to study Painting, Poetry, Musick, Architecture, Statuary, Tapestry, and Porcelaine.


Quote 172 details Share on Google+ - Quote 172 Linked In Share Button - Quote 172 If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or your arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen.

Samuel Adams: Unknown

Quote 176 details Share on Google+ - Quote 176 Linked In Share Button - Quote 176 It is a common observation here [Europe] that our cause is the cause of all mankind, and that we are fighting for their liberty in defending our own. It is a glorious task assigned us by Providence, which has, I trust, given us spirit and virtue equal to it, and will at last crown it with success.

Benjamin Franklin: Letter to Samuel Cooper (1 May 1777)

Quote 190 details Share on Google+ - Quote 190 Linked In Share Button - Quote 190 The fundamental source of all your errors, sophisms and false reasonings is a total ignorance of the natural rights of mankind. Were you once to become acquainted with these, you could never entertain a thought, that all men are not, by nature, entitled to a parity of privileges. You would be convinced, that natural liberty is a gift of the beneficent Creator to the whole human race, and that civil liberty is founded in that; and cannot be wrested from any people, without the most manifest violation of justice.

Alexander Hamilton: The Farmer Refuted, February 23, 1775

Quote 194 details Share on Google+ - Quote 194 Linked In Share Button - Quote 194 The idea of restraining the legislative authority in the means of providing for the national defense is one of those refinements which owe their origin to a zeal for liberty more ardent than enlightened.


Quote 197 details Share on Google+ - Quote 197 Linked In Share Button - Quote 197 The instrument by which it [government] must act are either the AUTHORITY of the laws or FORCE. If the first be destroyed, the last must be substituted; and where this becomes the ordinary instrument of government there is an end to liberty!

Alexander Hamilton: Tully, No. 3, August 28, 1794

Quote 214 details Share on Google+ - Quote 214 Linked In Share Button - Quote 214 There is a certain enthusiasm in liberty, that makes human nature rise above itself, in acts of bravery and heroism.

Alexander Hamilton: The Farmer Refuted, February 23, 1775

Quote 217 details Share on Google+ - Quote 217 Linked In Share Button - Quote 217 There is something so far-fetched and so extravagant in the idea of danger to liberty from the militia that one is at a loss whether to treat it with gravity or with raillery; whether to consider it as a mere trial of skill, like the paradoxes of rhetoricians; as a disingenuous artifice to instill prejudices at any price; or as the serious.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 29, January 10, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 254 details Share on Google+ - Quote 254 Linked In Share Button - Quote 254 But of all the views of this law none is more important, none more legitimate, than that of rendering the people the safe, as they are the ultimate, guardians of their own liberty. For this purpose the reading in the first stage, where they will receive their whole education, is proposed, as has been said, to be chiefly historical. History by apprising them of the past will enable them to judge of the future; it will avail them of the experience of other times and other nations; it will qualify them as judges of the actions and designs of men; it will enable them to know ambition under every disguise it may assume; and knowing it, to defeat its views.

Thomas Jefferson: Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 14, 1781

Quote 261 details Share on Google+ - Quote 261 Linked In Share Button - Quote 261 Neither the wisest constitution nor the wisest laws will secure the liberty and happiness of a people whose manners are universally corrupt.

Samuel Adams: Essay in the Public Advertiser, 1749

Quote 288 details Share on Google+ - Quote 288 Linked In Share Button - Quote 288 He [King George] has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred right of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating & carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither.

Thomas Jefferson: deleted portion of a draft of the Declaration of Independence, June, 1776

Quote 294 details Share on Google+ - Quote 294 Linked In Share Button - Quote 294 If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be. The functionaries of every government have propensities to command at will the liberty and property of their constituents. There is no safe deposit for these but with the people themselves; nor can they be safe with them without information. Where the press is free, and every man able to read , all is safe.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Colonel Charles Yancey, January 6, 1816
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 309 details Share on Google+ - Quote 309 Linked In Share Button - Quote 309 As long as the reason of man continues fallible, and he is at liberty to exercise it, different opinions will be formed. As long as the connection subsists between his reason and his self-love, his opinions and his passions will have a reciprocal influence on each other.

James Madison: Federalist No. 10, November 23, 1787
The Federalist Papers

Quote 320 details Share on Google+ - Quote 320 Linked In Share Button - Quote 320 Every man who loves peace, every man who loves his country, every man who loves liberty ought to have it ever before his eyes that he may cherish in his heart a due attachment to the Union of America and be able to set a due value on the means of preservi

James Madison: Unknown

Quote 321 details Share on Google+ - Quote 321 Linked In Share Button - Quote 321 Every man who loves peace, every man who loves his country, every man who loves liberty ought to have it ever before his eyes that he may cherish in his heart a due attachment to the Union of America and be able to set a due value on the means of preserving it.

James Madison: Federalist No. 41, January 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 337 details Share on Google+ - Quote 337 Linked In Share Button - Quote 337 In Europe, charters of liberty have been granted by power. America has set the example ... of charters of power granted by liberty. This revolution in the practice of the world, may, with an honest praise, be pronounced the most triumphant epoch of its history, and the most consoling presage of its happiness.

James Madison: National Gazette Essay, January 18, 1792

Quote 341 details Share on Google+ - Quote 341 Linked In Share Button - Quote 341 Is there no virtue among us? If there be not, we are in a wretched situation. No theoretical checks-no form of government can render us secure. To suppose that any form of government will secure liberty or happiness without any virtue in the people, is a chimerical idea, if there be sufficient virtue and intelligence in the community, it will be exercised in the selection of these men. So that we do not depend on their virtue, or put confidence in our rulers, but in the people who are to choose them.

James Madison: speech at the Virginia Ratifying Convention, June 20, 1788

Quote 342 details Share on Google+ - Quote 342 Linked In Share Button - Quote 342 It becomes all therefore who are friends of a Government based on free principles to reflect, that by denying the possibility of a system partly federal and partly consolidated, and who would convert ours into one either wholly federal or wholly consolidated, in neither of which forms have individual rights, public order, and external safety, been all duly maintained, they aim a deadly blow at the last hope of true liberty on the face of the Earth.

James Madison: Notes on Nullification

Quote 352 details Share on Google+ - Quote 352 Linked In Share Button - Quote 352 Justice is the end of government. It is the end of civil society. It ever has been and ever will be pursued until it be obtained, or until liberty be lost in the pursuit.

James Madison: Federalist No. 51, February 8, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 354 details Share on Google+ - Quote 354 Linked In Share Button - Quote 354 No political truth is certainly of greater intrinsic value, or is stamped with the authority of more enlightened patrons of liberty than that on which the objection is founded. The accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive, and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, self-appointed, or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny.

James Madison: Federalist No. 48, February 1, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 367 details Share on Google+ - Quote 367 Linked In Share Button - Quote 367 The best service that can be rendered to a Country, next to that of giving it liberty, is in diffusing the mental improvement equally essential to the preservation, and the enjoyment of the blessing.

James Madison: letter to Littleton Dennis Teackle, March 29, 1826



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