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Quote 371 details Share on Google+ - Quote 371 Linked In Share Button - Quote 371 The eyes of the world being thus on our Country, it is put the more on its good behavior, and under the greater obligation also, to do justice to the Tree of Liberty by an exhibition of the fine fruits we gather from it.

James Madison: letter to James Monroe, December 16, 1824

Quote 393 details Share on Google+ - Quote 393 Linked In Share Button - Quote 393 What spectacle can be more edifying or more seasonable, than that of Liberty and Learning, each leaning on the other for their mutual & surest support?


Quote 399 details Share on Google+ - Quote 399 Linked In Share Button - Quote 399 [He] will live in the memory and gratitude of the wise & good, as a luminary of Science, as a votary of liberty, as a model of patriotism, and as a benefactor of human kind.

James Madison: on Thomas Jefferson in a letter to Nicholas P. Trist, July 6, 1826

Quote 410 details Share on Google+ - Quote 410 Linked In Share Button - Quote 410 Freedom had been hunted round the globe; reason was considered as rebellion; and the slavery of fear had made men afraid to think. But such is the irresistible nature of truth, that all it asks, and all it wants, is the liberty of appearing.

Thomas Paine: Rights of Man, 1791
Quoted Document: Rights of Man - Thomas Paine

Quote 411 details Share on Google+ - Quote 411 Linked In Share Button - Quote 411 He that would make his own liberty secure, must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty, he establishes a precedent that will reach to himself.

Thomas Paine: Dissertation on First Principles of Government, December 23, 1791
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...
Quoted Document: Dissertation on first-principles of government

Quote 419 details Share on Google+ - Quote 419 Linked In Share Button - Quote 419 The Grecians and Romans were strongly possessed of the spirit of liberty but not the principle, for at the time they were determined not to be slaves themselves, they employed their power to enslave the rest of mankind.

Thomas Paine: The American Crisis, No. 5, March 21, 1778
Quoted Document: The Crisis

Quote 422 details Share on Google+ - Quote 422 Linked In Share Button - Quote 422 This new world hath been the asylum for the persecuted lovers of civil and religious liberty from every part of Europe. Hither have they fled, not from the tender embraces of the mother, but from the cruelty of the monster; and it is so far true of England, that the same tyranny which drove the first emigrants from home, pursues their descendants still.

Thomas Paine: Common Sense, 1776
Quoted Document: Common Sense - Thomas Paine

Quote 1362 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1362 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1362 All men are created equally free and independent, and have certain ihherent rights, of which they cannont, by any compact, deprive or divest their prosterity: among which are the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing the obtaining happiness and safety.

George Mason: First draft, Virginia Declaration of Rights, 1776
The Quotable Founding Fathers

Quote 462 details Share on Google+ - Quote 462 Linked In Share Button - Quote 462 Interwoven as is the love of liberty with every ligament of your hearts, no recommendation of mine is necessary to fortify or confirm the attachment.

George Washington: Farewell Address, September 19, 1796

Quote 474 details Share on Google+ - Quote 474 Linked In Share Button - Quote 474 Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth.

George Washington: letter to James Madison, March 2, 1788

Quote 497 details Share on Google+ - Quote 497 Linked In Share Button - Quote 497 The citizens of the United States of America have the right to applaud themselves for having given to mankind examples of an enlarged and liberal policy worthy of imitation. All possess alike liberty of conscience and immunities of citizenship. It is now no more that toleration is spoken of as if it were by the indulgence of one class of citizens that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights, for happily the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens in giving it on all occasions their effectual support.

George Washington: letter to the Hebrew Congregation of Newport, Rhode Island, September 9, 1790

Quote 499 details Share on Google+ - Quote 499 Linked In Share Button - Quote 499 The establishment of Civil and Religious Liberty was the Motive which induced me to the Field — the object is attained — and it now remains to be my earnest wish & prayer, that the Citizens of the United States could make a wise and virtuous use of the blessings placed before them.

George Washington: letter to the Reformed German Congregation of New York City, November 27, 1783

Quote 502 details Share on Google+ - Quote 502 Linked In Share Button - Quote 502 The hour is fast approaching, on which the Honor and Success of this army, and the safety of our bleeding Country depend. Remember officers and Soldiers, that you are Freemen, fighting for the blessings of Liberty — that slavery will be your portion, and that of your posterity, if you do not acquit yourselves like men.

George Washington: General Orders, August 23, 1776

Quote 503 details Share on Google+ - Quote 503 Linked In Share Button - Quote 503 The liberty enjoyed by the people of these states of worshiping Almighty God agreeably to their conscience, is not only among the choicest of their blessings, but also of their rights.

George Washington: to the Annual meeting of Quakers, September 1789

Quote 507 details Share on Google+ - Quote 507 Linked In Share Button - Quote 507 The preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered deeply, perhaps as finally, staked on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people.

George Washington: First Inaugural Address, April 30, 1789

Quote 511 details Share on Google+ - Quote 511 Linked In Share Button - Quote 511 The value of liberty was thus enhanced in our estimation by the difficulty of its attainment, and the worth of characters appreciated by the trial of adversity.

George Washington: letter to the people of South Carolina, Circa 1790

Quote 521 details Share on Google+ - Quote 521 Linked In Share Button - Quote 521 When we assumed the Soldier, we did not lay aside the Citizen; and we shall most sincerely rejoice with you in the happy hour when the establishment of American Liberty, upon the most firm and solid foundations shall enable us to return to our Private Stations in the bosom of a free, peacefully and happy Country.

George Washington: address to the New York Legislature, June 26, 1775

Quote 526 details Share on Google+ - Quote 526 Linked In Share Button - Quote 526 Among the natural rights of the Colonists are these: First, a right to life; Secondly, to liberty; Thirdly, to property; together with the right to support and defend them in the best manner they can. These are evident branches of, rather than deductions from, the duty of self-preservation, commonly called the first law of nature.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists, November 20, 1772

Quote 530 details Share on Google+ - Quote 530 Linked In Share Button - Quote 530 The natural liberty of man is to be free from any superior power on Earth, and not to be under the will or legislative authority of man, but only to have the law of nature for his rule

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists, November 20, 1772

Quote 531 details Share on Google+ - Quote 531 Linked In Share Button - Quote 531 It is the greatest absurdity to suppose it in the power of one, or any number of men, at the entering into society, to renounce their essential natural rights, or the means of preserving those rights; when the grand end of civil government, from the very nature of its institution, is for the support, protection, and defence of those very rights; the principal of which, as is before observed, are Life, Liberty, and Property. If men, through fear, fraud, or mistake, should in terms renounce or give up any essential natural right, the eternal law of reason and the grand end of society would absolutely vacate such renunciation. The right to freedom being the gift of God Almighty, it is not in the power of man to alienate this gift and voluntarily become a slave.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists, November 20, 1772

Quote 532 details Share on Google+ - Quote 532 Linked In Share Button - Quote 532 The Opinion of others I very little regard, & have a thorough Contempt for all men, be their Names Characters & Stations what they may, who appear to be the irreclaimable Enemies of Religion & Liberty.

Samuel Adams: Letter to William Checkley, December 14, 1772

Quote 540 details Share on Google+ - Quote 540 Linked In Share Button - Quote 540 Revelation assures us that "Righteousness exalteth a Nation" - Communities are dealt with in this World by the wise and just Ruler of the Universe. He rewards or punishes them according to their general Character. The diminution of publick Virtue is usually attended with that of publick Happiness, and the publick Liberty will not long survive the total Extinction of Morals.

Samuel Adams: Letter to John Scollay, April 30, 1776

Quote 546 details Share on Google+ - Quote 546 Linked In Share Button - Quote 546 Courage, then, my countrymen, our contest is not only whether we ourselves shall be free, but whether there shall be left to mankind an asylum on earth for civil and religious liberty.

Samuel Adams: Speech at the State House, Philadelphia, August 1, 1776

Quote 547 details Share on Google+ - Quote 547 Linked In Share Button - Quote 547 If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen

Samuel Adams: Speech at the Philadelphia State House, August 1, 1776

Quote 550 details Share on Google+ - Quote 550 Linked In Share Button - Quote 550 Religion and good morals are the only solid foundation of public liberty and happiness.

Samuel Adams: Letter to John Trumbull, October 16, 1778



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