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Quote 127 details Share on Google+ - Quote 127 Linked In Share Button - Quote 127 Constitutions of civil government are not to be framed upon a calculation of existing exigencies, but upon a combination of these with the probable exigencies of ages, according to the natural and tried course of human affairs. Nothing, therefore, can be more fallacious than to infer the extent of any power, proper to be lodged in the national government, from an estimate of its immediate necessities.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 34, January 4, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 133 details Share on Google+ - Quote 133 Linked In Share Button - Quote 133
Here sir, the people govern; here they act by their immediate representatives.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 17, 1788
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 310 details Share on Google+ - Quote 310 Linked In Share Button - Quote 310 As the cool and deliberate sense of the community ought in all governments, and actually will in all free governments ultimately prevail over the views of its rulers; so there are particular moments in public affairs, when the people stimulated by some irregular passion, or some illicit advantage, or misled by the artful misrepresentations of interested men, may call for measures which they themselves will afterwards be the most ready to lament and condemn. In these critical moments, how salutary will be the interference of some temperate and respectable body of citizens, in order to check the misguided career, and to suspend the blow mediated by the people against themselves, until reason, justice and truth, can regain their authority over the public mind?

James Madison: Federalist No. 63, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 314 details Share on Google+ - Quote 314 Linked In Share Button - Quote 314 But the mild voice of reason, pleading the cause of an enlarged and permanent interest, is but too often drowned, before public bodies as well as individuals, by the clamors of an impatient avidity for immediate and immoderate gain.

James Madison: Federalist No. 42, January 22, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 377 details Share on Google+ - Quote 377 Linked In Share Button - Quote 377 The members of the legislative department...are numerous. They are distributed and dwell among the people at large. Their connections of blood, of friendship, and of acquaintance embrace a great proportion of the most influential part of the society...they are more immediately the confidential guardians of their rights and liberties.

James Madison: Federalist No. 50, February 5, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 467 details Share on Google+ - Quote 467 Linked In Share Button - Quote 467 It should be the highest ambition of every American to extend his views beyond himself, and to bear in mind that his conduct will not only affect himself, his country, and his immediate posterity; but that its influence may be co-extensive with the world, and stamp political happiness or misery on ages yet unborn.

George Washington: letter to the Legislature of Pennsylvania, September 5, 1789

Quote 524 details Share on Google+ - Quote 524 Linked In Share Button - Quote 524 If you, or Colonel Dalrymple under you, have the power to remove one regiment you have the power to remove both. It is at your peril if you refuse. The meeting is composed of three thousand people. They have become impatient. A thousand men are already arrived from the neighborhood, and the whole country is in motion. Night is approaching. An immediate answer is expected. Both regiments or none!

Samuel Adams: Address to Acting Governor Thomas Hutchinson, the day after the Boston Massacre, March 6, 1770

Quote 612 details Share on Google+ - Quote 612 Linked In Share Button - Quote 612 The fabric of American empire ought to rest on the solid basis of the consent of the people. The streams of national power ought to flow immediately from that pure, original fountain of all legislative authority


Quote 719 details Share on Google+ - Quote 719 Linked In Share Button - Quote 719 I always considered an idle Life, as a real evil, but, a life of such hurry, such constant hurry, leaves us scarcely a moment for reflection or for the discharge of any other then the most immediate and pressing concerns.

Quote 5 details Share on Google+ - Quote 5 Linked In Share Button - Quote 5 Were I to suffer in the cause of American liberty, should I not be translated immediately to heaven as Enoch was of old?

Joseph Hewes: letter to James Iredell, October 31, 1774

Quote 1015 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1015 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1015 ... thus they may go and ad infinitum: allowing this unbounded power in a set of men at so great a distance, so little acquainted with our circumstances, and not immediately affected with ye taxes laid upon us, what security remains for our property? What fence against arbitrary enactions?


Quote 1043 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1043 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1043 We must not in the course of public life expect immediate approbation and immediate grateful acknowledgement of our services. But let us persevere through abuse and even injury. The internal satisfaction of a good conscience is always present, and time will do us justice in the minds of the people, even those at present the most prejudiced against us.

Benjamin Franklin: letter to Joseph Galloway, December 2, 1772
Respectfully quoted: A dictionary of quotations...

Quote 1254 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1254 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1254 I think it proper here not only to subscribe to the entire belief of the great and leading doctrines of the Christian religion, such as the Being of God, the universal defection and depravity of human nature, the divinity of the person and the completeness of the redemption purchased by the blessed Savior, the necessity of the operations of the Divine Spirit, of Divine Faith, accompanied with an habitual virtuous life, and the universality of the divine Providence, but also . . . that the fear of God is the beginning of wisdom; that the way of life held up in the Christian system is calculated for the most complete happiness that can be enjoyed in this mortal state; that all occasions of vice and immorality is injurious either immediately or consequentially, even in this life; that as Almighty God hath not been pleased in the Holy Scriptures to prescribe any precise mode in which He is to be publicly worshiped, all contention about it generally arises from want of knowledge or want of virtue.


Quote 1295 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1295 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1295 We think experience has proved it safer for the mass of individuals composing the society to reserve to themselves personally the exercise of all rightful powers to which they are competent and to delegate those to which they are not competent to deputies named and removable for unfaithful conduct by themselves immediately.

Thomas Jefferson: to Pierre Samuel Dupont de Nemours, 1816



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