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Quote 100 details Share on Google+ - Quote 100 Linked In Share Button - Quote 100 The foundation of national morality must be laid in private families.... How is it possible that Children can have any just Sense of the sacred Obligations of Morality or Religion if, from their earliest Infancy, they learn their Mothers live in habitual Infidelity to their fathers, and their fathers in as constant Infidelity to their Mothers?

John Adams: Diary, June 2, 1778

Quote 107 details Share on Google+ - Quote 107 Linked In Share Button - Quote 107 We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion. Avarice, ambition, revenge, or gallantry, would break the strongest cords of our Constitution as a whale goes through a net. Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.

John Adams: Address to the Military, October 11, 1798

Quote 114 details Share on Google+ - Quote 114 Linked In Share Button - Quote 114 GOD: I conceive for many reasons that he is a good being; as I should be happy to have so wise, good, and powerful a being my friend, let me consider in what manner I shall make myself most acceptable to him.

Benjamin Franklin: "Articles of Belief and Acts of Religion" (20 Nov. 1728)

Quote 115 details Share on Google+ - Quote 115 Linked In Share Button - Quote 115 Let me, then, not fail to praise my God continually, for it is his due, and it is all I can return for his many favors and great goodness to me; and let me resolve to be virtuous, that I may be happy, that I may please him who is delighted to see me happy.

Benjamin Franklin: "Articles of belief and Acts of Religion" (20 Nov. 1728)

Quote 151 details Share on Google+ - Quote 151 Linked In Share Button - Quote 151 In politics, as in religion, it is equally absurd to aim at making proselytes by fire and sword. Heresies in either can rarely be cured by persecution.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 1, October 27, 1787
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 252 details Share on Google+ - Quote 252 Linked In Share Button - Quote 252 Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between man and his God, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legislative powers of government reach actions only, and not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should "make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof," thus building a wall of separation between church and State.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to a Committee of the Danbury Baptist Association, Connecticut, January 1, 1802

Quote 368 details Share on Google+ - Quote 368 Linked In Share Button - Quote 368 The civil rights of none, shall be abridged on account of religious belief or worship, nor shall any national religion be established, nor shall the full and equal rights of conscience be in any manner, or on any pretext infringed.

James Madison: proposed amendment to the Constitution, given in a speech in the House of Representatives, 1789

Quote 389 details Share on Google+ - Quote 389 Linked In Share Button - Quote 389 We are teaching the world the great truth that Governments do better without Kings & Nobles than with them. The merit will be doubled by the other lesson that Religion Flourishes in greater purity, without than with the aid of Government.

James Madison: letter to Edward Livingston, July 10, 1822

Quote 445 details Share on Google+ - Quote 445 Linked In Share Button - Quote 445 Happy, thrice happy shall they be pronounced hereafter, who have contributed any thing, who have performed the meanest office in erecting this stupendous fabrick of Freedom and Empire on the broad basis of Independency; who have assisted in protecting the rights of humane nature and establishing an Asylum for the poor and oppressed of all nations and religions.

George Washington: General Orders, April 18, 1783

Quote 455 details Share on Google+ - Quote 455 Linked In Share Button - Quote 455 I now make it my earnest prayer, that God would have you, and the State over which you preside, in his holy protection, that he would incline the hearts of the Citizens to cultivate a spirit of subordination and obedience to Government, to entertain a brotherly affection and love for one another, for their fellow Citizens of the United States at large, and particularly for their brethren who have served in the Field, and finally, that he would most graciously be pleased to dispose us all, to do Justice, to love mercy, and to demean ourselves with that Charity, humility and pacific temper of mind, which were the Characteristicks of the Divine Author of our blessed Religion, and without an humble imitation of whose example in these things, we can never hope to be a happy Nation.

George Washington: circular letter of farewell to the Army, June 8, 1783

Quote 494 details Share on Google+ - Quote 494 Linked In Share Button - Quote 494 The blessed Religion revealed in the word of God will remain an eternal and awful monument to prove that the best Institution may be abused by human depravity; and that they may even, in some instances be made subservient to the vilest purposes. Should, hereafter, those incited by the lust of power and prompted by the Supineness or venality of their Constituents, overleap the known barriers of this Constitution and violate the unalienable rights of humanity: it will only serve to shew, that no compact among men (however provident in its construction and sacred in its ratification) can be pronounced everlasting an inviolable, and if I may so express myself, that no Wall of words, that no mound of parchm[en]t can be so formed as to stand against the sweeping torrent of boundless ambition on the side, aided by the sapping current of corrupted morals on the other.

George Washington: fragments of the Draft First Inaugural Address, April 1789

Quote 495 details Share on Google+ - Quote 495 Linked In Share Button - Quote 495 The bosom of America is open to receive not only the Opulent and respectable Stranger, but the oppressed and persecuted of all Nations and Religions; whom we shall welcome to a participation of all our rights and privileges, if by decency and propriety of conduct they appear to merit the enjoyment.

George Washington: Address to the Members of the Volunteer Association of Ireland, December 2, 1783

Quote 529 details Share on Google+ - Quote 529 Linked In Share Button - Quote 529 In regard to religion, mutual toleration in the different professions thereof is what all good and candid minds in all ages have ever practised, and, both by precept and example, inculcated on mankind."

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists, November 20, 1772

Quote 532 details Share on Google+ - Quote 532 Linked In Share Button - Quote 532 The Opinion of others I very little regard, & have a thorough Contempt for all men, be their Names Characters & Stations what they may, who appear to be the irreclaimable Enemies of Religion & Liberty.

Samuel Adams: Letter to William Checkley, December 14, 1772

Quote 543 details Share on Google+ - Quote 543 Linked In Share Button - Quote 543 He who made all men hath made the truths necessary to human happiness obvious to all. Our forefathers threw off the yoke of Popery in religion; for you is reserved the honor of leveling the popery of politics. They opened the Bible to all, and maintained the capacity of every man to judge for himself in religion.

Samuel Adams: Speech at the State House, Philadelphia, August 1, 1776

Quote 550 details Share on Google+ - Quote 550 Linked In Share Button - Quote 550 Religion and good morals are the only solid foundation of public liberty and happiness.

Samuel Adams: Letter to John Trumbull, October 16, 1778

Quote 554 details Share on Google+ - Quote 554 Linked In Share Button - Quote 554 Religion in a Family is at once its brightest Ornament & its best Security.

Samuel Adams: Letter to Thomas Wells, November 22, 1780

Quote 556 details Share on Google+ - Quote 556 Linked In Share Button - Quote 556 I could dwell on the importance of piety and religion; of industry and frugality; of prudence, economy, regularity and an even government; all which are essential to the well-being of a family. But I have not Time. I cannot however help repeating Piety, because I think it indispensible. Religion in a Family is at once its brightest Ornament & its best Security. The first Point of Justice, says a Writer I have met with, consists in Piety; Nothing certainly being so great a Debt upon us, as to render to the Creator & Preserver those Acknowledgments which are due to Him for our Being, and the hourly Protection he affords us.

Samuel Adams: Letter to Thomas Wells, November 22, 1780

Quote 567 details Share on Google+ - Quote 567 Linked In Share Button - Quote 567 If we continue to be a happy people, that happiness must be assured by the enacting and executing of reasonable and wise laws, expressed in the plainest language, and by establishing such modes of education as tend to inculcate in the minds of youth, the feelings and habits of "piety, religion and morality," and to lead them to the knowledge and love of those truly Republican principles upon which our civil institutions are founded.

Samuel Adams: Address to the Legislature o f Massachusetts, January 16, 1795

Quote 570 details Share on Google+ - Quote 570 Linked In Share Button - Quote 570 As Piety, Religion and Morality have a happy influence on the minds of men, in their public as well as private transactions, you will not think it unseasonable, although I have frequently done it, to bring to your remembrance the great importance of encouraging our University, town schools, and other seminaries of education, that our children and youth while they are engaged in the pursuit of useful science, may have their minds impressed with a strong sense of the duties they owe to their God, their instructors and each other, so that when they arrive to a state of manhood, and take a part in any public transactions, their hearts having been deeply impressed in the course of their education with the moral feelings - such feelings may continue and have their due weight through the whole of their future lives.

Samuel Adams: Address to the Legislature of Massachusetts, January 30, 1797

Quote 581 details Share on Google+ - Quote 581 Linked In Share Button - Quote 581 Without morals a republic cannot subsist any length of time; they therefore who are decrying the Christian religion, whose morality is so sublime and pure (and) which insures to the good eternal happiness, are undermining the solid foundation of morals, the best security for the duration of free governments.


Quote 582 details Share on Google+ - Quote 582 Linked In Share Button - Quote 582 By our form of government, the Christian religion is the established religion; and all sects and denominations of Christians are placed upon the same equal footing, and are equally entitled to protection in their religious liberty."

Samuel Chase: Unknown

Quote 611 details Share on Google+ - Quote 611 Linked In Share Button - Quote 611 Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports.... And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion


Quote 640 details Share on Google+ - Quote 640 Linked In Share Button - Quote 640 Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens... Let it simply be asked, where is the security for property, for reputation, for live, in the sense of religious obligations desert and oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of Justice? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education ... reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.


Quote 671 details Share on Google+ - Quote 671 Linked In Share Button - Quote 671 Amongst other strange things said of me, I hear it is said by the deists that I am one of the number; and indeed, that some good people think I am no Christian. This thought gives me much more pain than the appellation of Tory; because I think religion of infinitely higher importance than politics; and I find much cause to reproach myself that I have lived so long, and have given no decided and public proofs of my being a Christian. But, indeed, my dear child, this is a character which I prize far above all this world has, or can boast.

Patrick Henry: Unknown



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