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Quote 543 details Share on Google+ - Quote 543 Linked In Share Button - Quote 543 He who made all men hath made the truths necessary to human happiness obvious to all. Our forefathers threw off the yoke of Popery in religion; for you is reserved the honor of leveling the popery of politics. They opened the Bible to all, and maintained the capacity of every man to judge for himself in religion.

Samuel Adams: Speech at the State House, Philadelphia, August 1, 1776

Quote 550 details Share on Google+ - Quote 550 Linked In Share Button - Quote 550 Religion and good morals are the only solid foundation of public liberty and happiness.

Samuel Adams: Letter to John Trumbull, October 16, 1778

Quote 554 details Share on Google+ - Quote 554 Linked In Share Button - Quote 554 Religion in a Family is at once its brightest Ornament & its best Security.

Samuel Adams: Letter to Thomas Wells, November 22, 1780

Quote 556 details Share on Google+ - Quote 556 Linked In Share Button - Quote 556 I could dwell on the importance of piety and religion; of industry and frugality; of prudence, economy, regularity and an even government; all which are essential to the well-being of a family. But I have not Time. I cannot however help repeating Piety, because I think it indispensible. Religion in a Family is at once its brightest Ornament & its best Security. The first Point of Justice, says a Writer I have met with, consists in Piety; Nothing certainly being so great a Debt upon us, as to render to the Creator & Preserver those Acknowledgments which are due to Him for our Being, and the hourly Protection he affords us.

Samuel Adams: Letter to Thomas Wells, November 22, 1780

Quote 567 details Share on Google+ - Quote 567 Linked In Share Button - Quote 567 If we continue to be a happy people, that happiness must be assured by the enacting and executing of reasonable and wise laws, expressed in the plainest language, and by establishing such modes of education as tend to inculcate in the minds of youth, the feelings and habits of "piety, religion and morality," and to lead them to the knowledge and love of those truly Republican principles upon which our civil institutions are founded.

Samuel Adams: Address to the Legislature o f Massachusetts, January 16, 1795

Quote 570 details Share on Google+ - Quote 570 Linked In Share Button - Quote 570 As Piety, Religion and Morality have a happy influence on the minds of men, in their public as well as private transactions, you will not think it unseasonable, although I have frequently done it, to bring to your remembrance the great importance of encouraging our University, town schools, and other seminaries of education, that our children and youth while they are engaged in the pursuit of useful science, may have their minds impressed with a strong sense of the duties they owe to their God, their instructors and each other, so that when they arrive to a state of manhood, and take a part in any public transactions, their hearts having been deeply impressed in the course of their education with the moral feelings - such feelings may continue and have their due weight through the whole of their future lives.

Samuel Adams: Address to the Legislature of Massachusetts, January 30, 1797

Quote 581 details Share on Google+ - Quote 581 Linked In Share Button - Quote 581 Without morals a republic cannot subsist any length of time; they therefore who are decrying the Christian religion, whose morality is so sublime and pure (and) which insures to the good eternal happiness, are undermining the solid foundation of morals, the best security for the duration of free governments.


Quote 582 details Share on Google+ - Quote 582 Linked In Share Button - Quote 582 By our form of government, the Christian religion is the established religion; and all sects and denominations of Christians are placed upon the same equal footing, and are equally entitled to protection in their religious liberty."

Samuel Chase: Unknown

Quote 611 details Share on Google+ - Quote 611 Linked In Share Button - Quote 611 Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports.... And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion


Quote 640 details Share on Google+ - Quote 640 Linked In Share Button - Quote 640 Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens... Let it simply be asked, where is the security for property, for reputation, for live, in the sense of religious obligations desert and oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of Justice? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education ... reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.


Quote 671 details Share on Google+ - Quote 671 Linked In Share Button - Quote 671 Amongst other strange things said of me, I hear it is said by the deists that I am one of the number; and indeed, that some good people think I am no Christian. This thought gives me much more pain than the appellation of Tory; because I think religion of infinitely higher importance than politics; and I find much cause to reproach myself that I have lived so long, and have given no decided and public proofs of my being a Christian. But, indeed, my dear child, this is a character which I prize far above all this world has, or can boast.

Patrick Henry: Unknown

Quote 672 details Share on Google+ - Quote 672 Linked In Share Button - Quote 672 Doctor, I wish you to observe how real and beneficial the religion of Christ is to a man about to die....I am, however, much consoled by reflecting that the religion of Christ has, from its first appearance in the world, been attacked in vain by all the wits, philosophers, and wise ones, aided by every power of man, and its triumphs have been complete.

Patrick Henry: Unknown

Quote 673 details Share on Google+ - Quote 673 Linked In Share Button - Quote 673 This is all the inheritance I give to my dear family. The religion of Christ will give them one which will make them rich indeed.

Patrick Henry: November 20, 1798, in his Last Will and Testament

Quote 677 details Share on Google+ - Quote 677 Linked In Share Button - Quote 677 It is impossible to govern the world without God and the Bible. Of all the dispositions and habits that lead to political prosperity, our religion and morality are the indispensable supporters. Let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Reason and experience both forbid us to expect that our national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.


Quote 687 details Share on Google+ - Quote 687 Linked In Share Button - Quote 687
I have now disposed of all my property to my family. There is one thing more I wish I could give them, and that is the Christian Religion. If they had that and I had not given them one shilling they would have been rich; and if they had not that and I had given them all the world, they would be poor.

Patrick Henry: Unknown

Quote 710 details Share on Google+ - Quote 710 Linked In Share Button - Quote 710 In every country and every age, the priest has been hostile to liberty. He is always in alliance with the despot, abetting his abuses in return for protection to his own. It is easier to acquire wealth and power by this combination than by deserving them, and to effect this, they have perverted the purest religion ever preached to man into mystery and jargon, unintelligible to all mankind, and therefore the safer for their purposes.

Thomas Jefferson: in a letter to Horatio Spofford, 1814; from George Seldes, ed., The Great Quotations, Secaucus, New Jersey: Citadel Press, 1983, p. 371

Quote 722 details Share on Google+ - Quote 722 Linked In Share Button - Quote 722 I find that I agree fully with my good friend Patrick Henry when he said it cannot be emphasized too strongly or to often that this great nation was founded not by religionists, but by Christians, not on religions, but on The Gosple of Jesus Christ.


Quote 724 details Share on Google+ - Quote 724 Linked In Share Button - Quote 724 Mingling religion with politics may be disavowed and reprobated by every inhabitant of America.

Thomas Paine: Common Sense, 1776
Quoted Document: Common Sense - Thomas Paine

Quote 726 details Share on Google+ - Quote 726 Linked In Share Button - Quote 726 I am not a Federalist, because I never submitted the whole system of my opinions to the creed of any party of men whatever, in religion, in philosophy, in politics, or in anything else, where I was capable of thinking for myself. Such an addiction is the last degradation of a free and moral agent.

Thomas Jefferson: Letter to Francis Hopkinson, March 13, 1789

Quote 733 details Share on Google+ - Quote 733 Linked In Share Button - Quote 733 The genuine and simple religion of Jesus will one day be restored: such as it was preached and practiced by himself. Very soon after his death it became muffled up in mysteries, and has been ever since kept in concealment from the vulgar eye. To penetrate and dissipate these clouds of darkness, the general mind must be strengthened by education.

Thomas Jefferson: Letter to François Adriaan Van der Kemp, July 9, 1820

Quote 740 details Share on Google+ - Quote 740 Linked In Share Button - Quote 740 ...[t]hat the knowledge of the Gospel of Jesus Christ may be made known to all nations, pure and undefiled religion universally prevail, and the earth be fill with the glory of the Lord.

Josiah Bartlett: Proclamation for a Day of Fasting and Prayer, March 17, 1792

Quote 749 details Share on Google+ - Quote 749 Linked In Share Button - Quote 749 But besides the danger of a direct mixture of Religion & civil Government, there is an evil which ought to be guarded agst in the indefinite accumulation of property from the capacity of holding it in perpetuity by ecclesiastical corporations. The power of all corporations, ought to be limited in this respect. The growing wealth acquired by them never fails to be a source of abuses.

James Madison: Detached Memoranda, ca. 1817

Quote 782 details Share on Google+ - Quote 782 Linked In Share Button - Quote 782 It is true, we are not disposed to differ much, at present, about religion; but when we are making a constitution, it is to be hoped, for ages and millions yet unborn, why not establish the free exercise of religion as a part of the national compact.

Richard Henry Lee: Letters of a Federal Farmer - 1788

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The free men of America did not wait till usurped power had strengthened itself by exercise, and entangled the question in precedents. They saw all the consequences in the principle, and they avoided the consequences by denying the principle. We revere this lesson too much soon to forget it. Who does not see that the same authority which can establish Christianity, in exclusion of all other Religions, may establish with the same ease any particular sect of Christians, in exclusion of all other Sects? that the same authority which can force a citizen to contribute three pence only of his property for the support of any one establishment, may force him to conform to any other establishment in all cases whatsoever?

James Madison: Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments, 1785

Quote 824 details Share on Google+ - Quote 824 Linked In Share Button - Quote 824 Political freedom includes in it every other blessing. All the pleasures of riches, science, virtue, and religion itself derive their value from liberty alone. No wonder therefore wise and prudent legislators have in all ages been held in such great veneration; and no wonder too those illustrious souls who have employed their pens and sacrificed their lives in defense of liberty have met with such universal applause. Their reputations, like some majestic river which enlarges and widens as it approaches its parent ocean, shall become greater and greater through every age and outlive the ruins of the world itself.

Benjamin Rush: To Catharine Macaulay - January 18, 1769



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