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PEOPLE: Thomas Ritchie


He read law and medicine, but, instead of practicing either, set up a bookstore in Richmond, Virginia in 1803. He bought out the Republican newspaper the Richmond Enquirer in 1804, and made it a financial and political success, as editor and publisher for 41 years. The paper appe[MORE]

PEOPLE: Walter Jones


Born in Williamsburg, Virginia, Jones graduated from the College of William and Mary in 1760. He studied medicine in Edinburgh, Scotland and received a degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1770. He returned to Northumberland County, Virginia and became physician general of the Midd[MORE]

VIDEO: Common Sense by Thomas Paine [Philosophy Audiobook


Common Sense by Thomas Paine, Audiobook, Audio Philosophy. Thomas Paine has a claim to the title The Father of the American Revolution because of Common Sense, the pro-independence monograph pamphlet he anonymously published on January 10, 1776; signed "Written by an Englishman[MORE]

Quote 94 details Share on Google+ - Quote 94 Linked In Share Button - Quote 94 Public virtue cannot exist in a nation without private, and public virtue is the only foundation of republics. There must be a positive passion for the public good, the public interest, honour, power and glory, established in the minds of the people, or there can be no republican government, nor any real liberty: and this public passion must be superior to all private passions.

John Adams: letter to Mercy Warren, April 16, 1776

Quote 96 details Share on Google+ - Quote 96 Linked In Share Button - Quote 96 That, as a republic is the best of governments, so that particular arrangements of the powers of society, or, in other words, that form of government which is best contrived to secure an impartial and exact execution of the laws, is the best of republics.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 103 details Share on Google+ - Quote 103 Linked In Share Button - Quote 103 There is no good government but what is republican. That the only valuable part of the British constitution is so; for the true idea of a republic is "an empire of laws, and not of men." That, as a republic is the best of governments, so that particular arrangement of the powers of society, or in other words, that form of government which is best contrived to secure an impartial and exact execution of the law, is the best of republics.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 104 details Share on Google+ - Quote 104 Linked In Share Button - Quote 104 They define a republic to be a government of laws, and not of men.


Quote 124 details Share on Google+ - Quote 124 Linked In Share Button - Quote 124 As riches increase and accumulate in few hands, as luxury prevails in society, virtue will be in a greater degree considered as only a graceful appendage of wealth, and the tendency of things will be to depart from the republican standard. This is the real disposition of human nature; it is what neither the honorable member nor myself can correct. It is a common misfortunate that awaits our State constitution, as well as all others.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 130 details Share on Google+ - Quote 130 Linked In Share Button - Quote 130 Foreign influence is truly the Grecian horse to a republic. We cannot be too careful to exclude its influence.

Alexander Hamilton: Pacificus, No. 6, July 17, 1793

Quote 137 details Share on Google+ - Quote 137 Linked In Share Button - Quote 137 I trust that the proposed Constitution afford a genuine specimen of representative government and republican government; and that it will answer, in an eminent degree, all the beneficial purposes of society.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 142 details Share on Google+ - Quote 142 Linked In Share Button - Quote 142 A primary object should be the education of our youth in the science of government. In a republic, what species of knowledge can be equally important? And what duty more pressing... than ... communicating it to those who are to be the future guardians of the liberties of the country?

George Washington: A primary object should be the education of our youth in the science of government.

Quote 146 details Share on Google+ - Quote 146 Linked In Share Button - Quote 146 If it be asked, What is the most sacred duty and the greatest source of our security in a Republic? The answer would be, An inviolable respect for the Constitution and Laws — the first growing out of the last.... A sacred respect for the constitutional law is the vital principle, the sustaining energy of a free government.

Alexander Hamilton: Essay in the American Daily Advertiser, Aug 28, 1794

Quote 183 details Share on Google+ - Quote 183 Linked In Share Button - Quote 183 Of those men who have overturned the liberties of republics, the greatest number have begun their career by paying an obsequious court to the people, commencing demagogues and ending tyrants

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 1, October 27, 1787
The Federalist Papers

Quote 193 details Share on Google+ - Quote 193 Linked In Share Button - Quote 193 The history of ancient and modern republics had taught them that many of the evils which those republics suffered arose from the want of a certain balance, and that mutual control indispensable to a wise administration. They were convinced that popular assemblies are frequently misguided by ignorance, by sudden impulses, and the intrigues of ambitious men; and that some firm barrier against these operations was necessary. They, therefore, instituted your Senate.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 195 details Share on Google+ - Quote 195 Linked In Share Button - Quote 195 The ingredients which constitute energy in the Executive are, first, unity; secondly, duration; thirdly, an adequate provision for its support; fourthly, competent powers. ... The ingredients which constitute safety in the republican sense are, first, a due dependence on the people, secondly, a due responsibility.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 70, March 14, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 204 details Share on Google+ - Quote 204 Linked In Share Button - Quote 204 The regular distribution of power into distinct departments; the introduction of legislative balances and checks; the institution of courts composed of judges holding their offices during good behavior; the representation of the people in the legislature by deputies of their own election... They are means, and powerful means, by which the excellences of republican government may be retained and its imperfections lessened or avoided.


Quote 205 details Share on Google+ - Quote 205 Linked In Share Button - Quote 205 The republican principle demands that the deliberate sense of the community should govern the conduct of those to whom they entrust the management of their affairs; but it does not require an unqualified complaisance to every sudden breeze of passion or to every transient impulse which the people may receive from the arts of men, who flatter their prejudices to betray their interests.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 71, March 18, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 240 details Share on Google+ - Quote 240 Linked In Share Button - Quote 240 A judiciary independent of a king or executive alone, is a good thing; but independence of the will of the nation is a solecism, at least in a republican government.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Thomas Ritchie, December 25, 1820

Quote 247 details Share on Google+ - Quote 247 Linked In Share Button - Quote 247
Although a republican government is slow to move, yet when once in motion, its momentum becomes irresistible.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Francis C. Gray, 1815

Quote 299 details Share on Google+ - Quote 299 Linked In Share Button - Quote 299 A republic, by which I mean a government in which the scheme of representation takes place, opens a different prospect and promises the cure for which we are seeking.

James Madison: letter to William Hunter, March 11, 1790

Quote 311 details Share on Google+ - Quote 311 Linked In Share Button - Quote 311 As there is a degree of depravity in mankind which requires a certain degree of circumspection and distrust: So there are other qualities in human nature, which justify a certain portion of esteem and confidence. Republican government presupposes the existence of these qualities in a higher degree than any other form. Were the pictures which have been drawn by the political jealousy of some among us, faithful likenesses of the human character, the inference would be that there is not sufficient virtue among men for self-government; and that nothing less than the chains of despotism can restrain them from destroying and devouring one another.

James Madison: Federalist No. 55, February 15, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 335 details Share on Google+ - Quote 335 Linked In Share Button - Quote 335 If we resort for a criterion to the different principles on which different forms of government are established, we may define a republic to be, or at least may bestow that name on, a government which derives all its powers directly or indirectly from the great body of the people, and is administered by persons holding their offices during pleasure for a limited period, or during good behavior.

James Madison: Federalist No. 39, January 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 339 details Share on Google+ - Quote 339 Linked In Share Button - Quote 339 In the first place, it is to be remembered, that the general government is not to be charged with the whole power of making and administering laws: its jurisdiction is limited to certain enumerated objects, which concern all the members of the republic, but which are not to be attained by the separate provisions of any.

James Madison: Federalist No. 14, November 30, 1787
The Federalist Papers

Quote 432 details Share on Google+ - Quote 432 Linked In Share Button - Quote 432 Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence, (I conjure you to believe me fellow citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake; since history and experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of Republican Government.

George Washington: Farewell Address, September 19, 1796

Quote 507 details Share on Google+ - Quote 507 Linked In Share Button - Quote 507 The preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered deeply, perhaps as finally, staked on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people.

George Washington: First Inaugural Address, April 30, 1789



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