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VIDEO: 25 Interesting Things You Didn't Know About George


Did you know that before fighting against the British he actually fought for the British? These are 25 interesting things you didn't know about George Washington. twitter.com/list25 www.facebook.com/list25 list25.com Check out the text version too! - list25.com/25-interes[MORE]

VIDEO: Franklin's Spark (1720-1765)


Benjamin Franklin is Philadelphia's most iconic citizen, but how did William Penn's city shape the man often called "The First American"? This episode follows Franklin from his arrival as a fugitive indentured servant to his emergence as a leader of craftsmen, civic innovator, me[MORE]

VIDEO: James Monroe Facts and Biography


US President James Monroe served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, served as Ambassador to France, and even served as governor of Virginia before becoming president. He was a popular president who is credited with creating a foreign policy that lasted longer t[MORE]

VIDEO: Edward Rutledge


A brief biography of the life of Edward Rutledge, statesman, South Carolina Governor, and signer of the Declaration of Independence. Through the use of archival materials, scholar interviews, visits to historic landmarks, and reenactments, this program details the events surround[MORE]

Quote 32 details Share on Google+ - Quote 32 Linked In Share Button - Quote 32 Finally, there seem to be but three Ways for a Nation to acquire Wealth. The first is by War as the Romans did in plundering their conquered Neighbours. This is Robbery. The second by Commerce which is generally Cheating. The third by Agriculture the only honest Way; wherein Man receives a real Increase of the Seed thrown into the Ground, in a kind of continual Miracle wrought by the Hand of God in his favour, as a Reward for his innocent Life, and virtuous Industry.

Benjamin Franklin: Positions to be Examined, April 4, 1769

Quote 29 details Share on Google+ - Quote 29 Linked In Share Button - Quote 29 All the property that is necessary to a Man, for the Conservation of the Individual and the Propagation of the Species, is his natural Right, which none can justly deprive him of: But all Property superfluous to such purposes is the Property of the Publick, who, by their Laws, have created it, and who may therefore by other laws dispose of it, whenever the Welfare of the Publick shall demand such Disposition. He that does not like civil Society on these Terms, let him retire and live among Savages. He can have no right to the benefits of Society, who will not pay his Club towards the Support of it.

Benjamin Franklin: letter to Robert Morris, December 25, 1783

Quote 64 details Share on Google+ - Quote 64 Linked In Share Button - Quote 64 But what do we mean by the American Revolution? Do we mean the American war? The Revolution was effected before the war commenced. The Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people; a change in their religious sentiments, of their duties and obligations...This radical change in the principles, opinions, sentiments, and affections of the people was the real American Revolution.

John Adams: letter to H. Niles, February 13, 1818

Quote 44 details Share on Google+ - Quote 44 Linked In Share Button - Quote 44 Keep your eyes wide open before marriage, half shut afterwards.


Quote 74 details Share on Google+ - Quote 74 Linked In Share Button - Quote 74 I have accepted a seat in the [Massachusetts] House of Representatives, and thereby have consented to my own ruin, to your ruin, and the ruin of our children. I give you this warning, that you may prepare your mind for your fate.


Quote 75 details Share on Google+ - Quote 75 Linked In Share Button - Quote 75 I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. My sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history and naval architecture, navigation, commerce and agriculture, in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry, and porcelain.

John Adams: letter to Abigail Adams, 1780

Quote 84 details Share on Google+ - Quote 84 Linked In Share Button - Quote 84 It ought to be commemorated, as the Day of Deliverance by solemn Acts of Devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more. You will think me transported with Enthusiasm but I am not. I am well aware of the Toil and Blood and Treasure, that it will cost Us to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States. Yet through all the Gloom I can see the Rays of ravishing Light and Glory. I can see that the End is more than worth all the Means. And that Posterity will tryumph in that Days Transaction, even altho We should rue it, which I trust in God We shall not.


Quote 90 details Share on Google+ - Quote 90 Linked In Share Button - Quote 90 Men must be ready, they must pride themselves and be happy to sacrifice their private pleasures, passions and interests, nay, their private friendships and dearest connections, when they stand in competition with the rights of society.

John Adams: letter to Mercy Warren, April 16, 1776

Quote 94 details Share on Google+ - Quote 94 Linked In Share Button - Quote 94 Public virtue cannot exist in a nation without private, and public virtue is the only foundation of republics. There must be a positive passion for the public good, the public interest, honour, power and glory, established in the minds of the people, or there can be no republican government, nor any real liberty: and this public passion must be superior to all private passions.

John Adams: letter to Mercy Warren, April 16, 1776

Quote 118 details Share on Google+ - Quote 118 Linked In Share Button - Quote 118 My rule in which I have always found satisfaction, is never to turn aside in public affairs through views of private interest, but to go straight forward in doing what appears to me right at the time, leaving the consequences with Providence.

Benjamin Franklin: Letter to Jane Mecom (30 Dec. 1770), Van Doren, Autobiographical Writings, p. 202

Quote 166 details Share on Google+ - Quote 166 Linked In Share Button - Quote 166 Be not intimidated... nor suffer yourselves to be wheedled out of your liberties by any pretense of politeness, delicacy, or decency. These, as they are often used, are but three different names for hypocrisy, chicanery and cowardice

John Adams: Unknown

Quote 929 details Share on Google+ - Quote 929 Linked In Share Button - Quote 929 The Science of Government it is my Duty to study, more than all other Sciences: the Art of Legislation and Administration and Negotiation, out to take Place, indeed to exclude in a manner all other arts. I must study Politicks and War that my sons my have liberty to study mathematicks and Philosophy. My sons out to study Mathematicks and Philosophy, geography, natural History, Naval Architecture, navigation, commerce and Agriculture, in order to give their Children a right to study Painting, Poetry, Musick, Architecture, Statuary, Tapestry, and Porcelaine.


Quote 171 details Share on Google+ - Quote 171 Linked In Share Button - Quote 171 To be prepared for war is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace.

George Washington: George Washington (1732-1799) Founding Father, 1st US President, "Father of the Country"

Quote 178 details Share on Google+ - Quote 178 Linked In Share Button - Quote 178 Let us recollect that peace or war will not always be left to our option; that however moderate or unambitious we may be, we cannot count upon the moderation, or hope to extinguish the ambition of others.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 34, January 4, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 182 details Share on Google+ - Quote 182 Linked In Share Button - Quote 182 Of all the cares or concerns of government, the direction of war most peculiarly demands those qualities which distinguish the exercise of power by a single hand. The direction of war implies the direction of the common strength; and the power of directing and employing the common strength, forms a usual and essential part in the definition of the executive authority.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 74, March 25, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 222 details Share on Google+ - Quote 222 Linked In Share Button - Quote 222 To judge from the history of mankind, we shall be compelled to conclude that the fiery and destructive passions of war reign in the human breast with much more powerful sway than the mild and beneficent sentiments of peace; and that to model our political systems upon speculations of lasting tranquility would be to calculate on the weaker springs of human character.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 34, January 4, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 224 details Share on Google+ - Quote 224 Linked In Share Button - Quote 224 War, like most other things, is a science to be acquired and perfected by diligence, by perseverance, by time, and by practice.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 25, December 21, 1787
The Federalist Papers

Quote 232 details Share on Google+ - Quote 232 Linked In Share Button - Quote 232 Wise politicians will be cautious about fettering the government with restrictions that cannot be observed, because they know that every break of the fundamental laws, though dictated by necessity, impairs that sacred reverence which ought to be maintained in the breast of rulers towards the constitution of a country.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 25, December 21, 1787
The Federalist Papers

Quote 242 details Share on Google+ - Quote 242 Linked In Share Button - Quote 242 A rigid economy of the public contributions and absolute interdiction of all useless expenses will go far towards keeping the government honest and unoppressive.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Lafayette, 1823

Quote 256 details Share on Google+ - Quote 256 Linked In Share Button - Quote 256 Cherish, therefore, the spirit of our people, and keep alive their attention. Do not be too severe upon their errors, but reclaim them by enlightening them. If once they become inattentive to the public affairs, you and I, and Congress, and Assemblies, Judges, and Governors, shall all become wolves.

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Edward Carrington, January 16, 1787

Quote 288 details Share on Google+ - Quote 288 Linked In Share Button - Quote 288 He [King George] has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred right of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating & carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither.

Thomas Jefferson: deleted portion of a draft of the Declaration of Independence, June, 1776



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