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BOOK: The Real George Washington


The Real George Washington: The True Story of America s Most Indispensable Man. There is properly no history; only biography, wrote Ralph Waldo Emerson. If that is true of the general run of mankind, it is particularly true of George Washington. The story of his life is the stor[MORE]

BOOK: The Founding Fathers


A completely newly researched story of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, and of the lives of the most prominent framers of the Constitution: Oliver Ellsworth, Benjamin Franklin, Nathaniel Gotham, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, George Mason, Gouverneur Morris, Charles Cot[MORE]

BOOK: 1776


America’s beloved and distinguished historian presents, in a book of breathtaking excitement, drama, and narrative force, the stirring story of the year of our nation’s birth, 1776, interweaving, on both sides of the Atlantic, the actions and decisions that led Great Britain [MORE]

BOOK: America's Godly Heritage


America's Godly Heritage clearly sets forth the beliefs of many famous Founding Fathers concerning the proper role of Christian principles in education, government, and the public affairs of the nation. The beliefs of Founders such as Patrick Henry, John Quincy Adams, John Jay, G[MORE]

BOOK: For God and Country (T.K. Marion)


The United States of America was founded on faith, courage and sacrifice. Profound evidence of this was best displayed by General George Washington and his Continental Army during the American Revolution. In fact, more precisely, at Valley Forge during the winter 1777-8. The hist[MORE]

BOOK: The Wit and Wisdom of the Founding Fathers


With a foreword by Roy Blount Jr., Z all (Abe Lincoln Laughing, Univ. of Tennessee, 1995) embarks on an unusual collection of writings and anecdotes from the personal correspondence and private memoirs of the Founding Fathers. Each chapter begins with an introduction to the life [MORE]

PEOPLE: William Cushing


William Cushing (March 1, 1732 – September 13, 1810) was an early Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, from its inception to his death. He was the longest-serving of the Court's original members, sitting on the bench for 21 years. Had he accepted George Washing[MORE]

PEOPLE: Thomas Ritchie


He read law and medicine, but, instead of practicing either, set up a bookstore in Richmond, Virginia in 1803. He bought out the Republican newspaper the Richmond Enquirer in 1804, and made it a financial and political success, as editor and publisher for 41 years. The paper appe[MORE]

PEOPLE: Edmund Pendleton


Edmund Pendleton (September 9, 1721 – October 23, 1803) was a Virginia planter, politician, lawyer and judge. He served in the Virginia legislature before and during the American Revolutionary War, rising to the position of Speaker. Pendleton attended the First Continental Cong[MORE]

VIDEO: 25 Interesting Things You Didn't Know About George


Did you know that before fighting against the British he actually fought for the British? These are 25 interesting things you didn't know about George Washington. twitter.com/list25 www.facebook.com/list25 list25.com Check out the text version too! - list25.com/25-interes[MORE]

VIDEO: George Washington - Mini Biography


Watch a short biography video of George Washington and learn about the life of the first President of the United States. Learn more about George Washington: bit.ly/14H5YcC Watch the U.S. Presidents play list: www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-IgxSn21jU&list=PLRlmwKnv77HoRbV8JpLxx5SIDaX[MORE]

VIDEO: President James Madison Biography


www.facts-about.org.uk/american-president-james-madison.htm. Watch this video about President James Madison providing interesting, fun facts and info about the life biography of James Madison, the first President of America. Gain a fast overview of his life! Short biography with [MORE]

VIDEO: #01 George Washington


Excerpt from the History Channel's The Presidents series featuring George Wahsington.[MORE]

VIDEO: President James Monroe Biography


www.facts-about.org.uk/american-president-james-monroe.htm. Watch this video about President James Monroe providing interesting, fun facts and info about the life biography of James Monroe, the first President of America. Gain a fast overview of his life! Short biography with key[MORE]

Quote 55 details Share on Google+ - Quote 55 Linked In Share Button - Quote 55 When all government, domestic and foreign, in little as in great things, shall be drawn to Washington as the center of all power, it will render powerless the checks provided of one government on another, and will become as venal and oppressive as the government from which we separated."

Thomas Jefferson: letter to Charles Hammond, 1821

Quote 171 details Share on Google+ - Quote 171 Linked In Share Button - Quote 171 To be prepared for war is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace.

George Washington: George Washington (1732-1799) Founding Father, 1st US President, "Father of the Country"

Quote 289 details Share on Google+ - Quote 289 Linked In Share Button - Quote 289
His integrity was most pure, his justice the most inflexible I have ever known, no motives of interest or consanguinity, of friendship or hatred, being able to bias his decision. He was indeed, in every sense of the words, a wise, a good, and a great man.

Thomas Jefferson: on George Washington in a letter to Dr. Walter Jones, January 2, 1814

Quote 443 details Share on Google+ - Quote 443 Linked In Share Button - Quote 443 Gentlemen, you will permit me to put on my spectacles, for, I have grown not only gray, but almost blind in the service of my country.

George Washington, upon fumbling for his glasses before delivering the

George Washington: Newburgh Address, March 15, 1783

Quote 517 details Share on Google+ - Quote 517 Linked In Share Button - Quote 517 To form a new Government, requires infinite care, and unbounded attention; for if the foundation is badly laid the superstructure must be bad.

George Washington: letter to John Augustine Washington, May 31, 1776

Quote 769 details Share on Google+ - Quote 769 Linked In Share Button - Quote 769 We have considered the previous question stated in a letter written by your direction to us by the Secretary of Sate on the 18th of last Month, the liens of separation drawn by the Constitution between the three departments of government. These being in certain respects checks upon each other, and our being judges of a court in the last resort, are considerations which afford strong arguments against the propriety of our extra-judicially deciding the questions alluded to, especially as the power given by the Constitution the President, of calling on the heads of departments for opinions, seems to have been purposely and well as expressly united to the executive departments.

John Jay: To George Washington - August 8, 1793

Quote 815 details Share on Google+ - Quote 815 Linked In Share Button - Quote 815 Colonel Washington appears at Congress in his uniform, and, by his great experience and abilities in military matters, is of much service to us. O that I were a soldier! I will be. I am reading military books. Everybody must, and I will, and shall, be a soldier.

John Adams: Letter to Abigail Adams, May 29, 1775

Quote 966 details Share on Google+ - Quote 966 Linked In Share Button - Quote 966 Were we directed from Washington when to sow, & when to reap, we should soon want bread.

Quote 1037 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1037 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1037 With this great example before me [George Washington], with the sense and spirit, the faith and honor, the duty and interest, of the same American people pledged to support the Constitution of the United States, I entertain no doubt of its continuance in all its energy, and my mind is prepared without hesitation to lay myself under the most solemn obligations to support it to the utmost of my power.

John Adams: Inaugural Address - Philadelphia March 4, 1797
Quoted Document: John Adams Inaugural Address

Quote 1063 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1063 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1063 We have reason to be thankful to God for the success of the arms of the U.S. the last year of the war, both at sea and land; it is true, the enemy got possession of the city of Washington (an unfortified and open town) and retained it four & twenty hours, but they were beaten at Baltimore, Chippewa, Bridgetown, Erie, with equal numbers; on Lake Champlain and at Plattsburgh a glorious victory was obtained over them by inferior numbers, and to crown the whole, they sustained a most signal defeat at New-Orleans by a still less proportion of combatants, the great majority of whom were Militia, brave but undisciplined. By these events our Independence is strengthened and the American character exalted. We may now reasonably hope for a durable peace, altho’ we must expect annoyances, while there are wars in Europe between the countries with whom we trade.

Thomas McKean: letter to John Adams, 1 July 1815

Quote 1065 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1065 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1065 Though I shall never write a history, I will give you a historical fact respecting the Declaration of Independence, which may amuse, if not surprise.

On the 1st of July, 1776, the question was taken in committee of the whole of Congress, when Pennsylvania, represented by seven members then present, voted against it, four to three. Among the majority were Robert Morris and John Dickinson. Delaware (having only two present, namely, myself and Mr. Read) was divided. All the other States voted in favor of it. The report was delayed until the 4th; and, in the mean time, I sent an express for Cæsar Rodney to Dover, in the County of Kent, in Delaware, at my private expense, whom I met at the State House door, on the 4th of July, in his boots. He resided eighty miles from the city, and just arrived as Congress met. The question was taken. Delaware voted in favor of Independence. Pennsylvania (there being only five members present, Messrs. Dickinson and Morris absent) voted also for it. Messrs. Willing and Humphries were against it. Thus the thirteen States were unanimous in favor of Independence. Notwithstanding this, in the printed public journal of Congress for 1776, Vol. II., it appears that the Declaration of Independence was declared on the 4th of July, 1776, by the gentlemen whose names are there inserted: whereas, no persons signed it on that day; and, among the names there inserted, one gentleman, namely, George Read, Esq., was not in favor of it; and seven were not in Congress on that day, namely, Messrs. Morris, Rush, Clymer, Smith, Taylor, and Ross, all of Pennsylvania, and Mr. Thornton, of New Hampshire; nor were the six gentlemen last named members of Congress on the 4th of July. The five for Pennsylvania were appointed delegates by the convention of that State on the 20th of July, and Mr. Thornton took his seat in Congress, for the first time, on the 4th of November following; when the names of Henry Hinds, of New York, and Thomas McKean, of Delaware, are not printed as subscribers, though both were present in Congress on the 4th of July, and voted for Independence.

Here false colors are certainly hung out. There is culpability somewhere. What I have heard as an explanation is as follows: When the Declaration was voted, it was ordered to be engrossed on parchment, and then signed; and that a few days afterwards a Resolution was entered on the secret journal that no person should have a seat in Congress during that year until he should have signed the Declaration of Independence. After the 4th of July, I was not in Congress for several months, having marched with a regiment of Associators, as Colonel, to support General Washington, until the flying camp of ten thousand men was completed. When the Associators were discharged, I returned to Philadelphia, took my seat in Congress, and signed my name to the Declaration on parchment. This transaction should be truly stated, and the then secret journal should be made public. In the manuscript journal, Mr. Pickering, then Secretary of State, and myself, saw a printed half-sheet of paper, with the names of the members afterwards in the printed journals stitched in. We examined the parchment, where my name is signed in my own handwriting.

Thomas McKean: letter to John Adams, 7 January 1814



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