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Quote 1071 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1071 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1071 There—for your entertainment & amusement, will pass before you in Review the rise and fall of succeding Empires, from the birth of time to the present period—there you will at leisure Review the various Stages, and shifting scenes of the last glorious Revolution, in which you, Sir, with your compatriot Army, have reaped the Laurels of the well-fought Field, and returned triumphant with the plaudit of a gazing World. there, you will enjoy the pleasing satisfaction of viewing, as the fruit of your services in those "anxious days and nights" spent in conflicting War, an Empire rising with unrivalled dignity—And there—not confined to the present sphere, your contemplations will expand, and look forward to the brighter scenes of Eternity, and anticipate that future glory which the "pure and benign light of Revelation" most perfective of human Virtue, has taught you so firmly to realize—and there—will you, greatly perfect in those virtues which "were the characteristic of the divine author of our blessed Religion, & in humble imitation of whom," you will ripen for that seat of immortal felicity, to which, when satisfied with life, may you be raptured by an Escort of Guardian Angels. I have the honor to be with all imaginable respect

Lyman Hall: letter to George Washington, 15 August 1783

Quote 1089 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1089 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1089 My Situation is rather unlucky in A Government very deficient in its Laws and those greatly relaxed in their Execution, A Legislature as yet incompleat and not disposed to unite and give Aid to the executive Authority.

George Read: letter to George Washington, February 5 1778

Quote 1103 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1103 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1103 [George Washington] And as to you, Sir, treacherous is private friendship (for so you have been to me, and that in the day of danger) and a hypocrite in public life, the world will be puzzled to decide whether you are an apostate or an impostor; whether you have abandoned good principles, or whether you ever had any.

Quote 1104 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1104 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1104 I return your Excellency Thanks for your Polite Congratulation on my Appointment to the Government of this State, and shall be happy if by my Exertions in my Department I shall be able to contribute to the general Interest and Welfare of the United States.

William Paca: letter to George Washington, April 25, 1783

Quote 1105 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1105 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1105 As long Sir as Mankind shall retain a proper Sense of the Blessings of Peace Liberty and Safety, your Character in every Country and in every Age will be honor’d admir’d and rever’d: but to a Mind elevated as your’s, the Consciousness of having done Great and illustrious Deeds from the purest Principles of Patriotism; of having by your Wisdom and Magnanimity arrested the Arm of Tyranny—saved a dear Country and Millions of Fellow Citizens—and Millions yet unborn—from Slavery and all the Horrors and Calamities of Slavery, and placed their Rights and Liberties on a Permanent Foundation—must yield a Satisfaction infinitely superior to all the Pomp and Eclat of applauding Ages and admiring Worlds.

William Paca: letter to George Washington, December 20, 1783

Quote 1106 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1106 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1106 Amidst the general Joy on the happy and honourable Termination of the War we beg Leave to welcome your Excellency’s return to this City with Hearts Full of Gratitude and Affection.

William Paca: letter to George Washington, December 20, 1783

Quote 1118 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1118 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1118 To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest Glory to laud the more distinguished Character of Christian.

George Washington: Orders issued on May 2, 1778 by George Washington to his troops at Valley Forge
For God and Country (T.K. Marion)

Quote 1119 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1119 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1119 Almighty God hath created the mind free. All attempts to influence it by temporal punishments or burdens ... are a departure of the plan of the Holy Author of our religion.

Thomas Jefferson: Inscription on the northwest quadrant of the Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C., selected by the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Commission.
For God and Country (T.K. Marion)

Quote 1127 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1127 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1127 Our All is at Stake, and the little Conveniences and Comforts of Life, when set in Competition with our Liberty, ought to be rejected not with Reluctance but with Pleasure.

George Mason: letter to George Washington, April 5, 1769

Quote 1144 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1144 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1144 Good husbandry with us consists in abandoning Indian corn and tobacco, tending small grain, some red clover following, and endeavoring to have, while the lands are at rest, a spontaneous cover of white clover. I do not present this as a culture judicious in itself, but as good in comparison with what most people there pursue.


Quote 1158 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1158 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1158
As I have heard since my arrival at this place a circumstantial account of my death and dying Speech; I take this early opportunity to contradicting the first, and of assuring you, that I have not as yet composed the latter.


Quote 1196 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1196 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1196 It is better to offer no excuse than a bad one.

George Washington: letter to Harriet Washington (niece), October 30, 1791

Quote 1211 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1211 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1211 It is enough that you should have heard, that one party has seriously urged, that we should adopt the New Constitution because it has been approved by Washington and Franklin: and the other, with all the solemnity of apostolic address to Men, Brethren, Fathers, Friends and Countryman, have urged that we should reject, as dangerous, every clause thereof, because that Washington is more used to command as a soldier, than to reason as a politician Franklin is old, others are young and Wilson is haughty. You are too well informed to decide by the opinion of others, and too independent to need a caution against undue influence.

Roger Sherman: The Countryman - Nov 22, 1787
Quoted Document: The Countryman

Quote 1257 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1257 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1257 It is easy to make acquaintances, but very difficult to shake them off, however irksome and unprofitable they are found, after we have once committed ourselves to them.

Quote 1265 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1265 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1265 Light reading (by this, I mean books of little importance) may amuse for the moment, but leaves nothing solid behind.

Quote 1276 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1276 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1276
A good moral character is the first essential in a man, and that the habits contracted at your age are generally indelible, and your conduct here may stamp your character through life. It is therefore highly important that you should endeavor not only to be learned but virtuous.

George Washington: to George Steptoe Washington, December 5, 1790
The Quotable Founding Fathers

Quote 1302 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1302 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1302 When a question arises, whether any particular law or appointment is still in force, we are to examine, not whether it was pronounced by the ancient or present organ, but whether it has been at any time revoked by the authority of the nation, expressed by the organ competent at the time.

Quote 1356 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1356 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1356 Errors, or caprices of the temper, can be pardoned and forgotten; but a cold, deliberate crime of the heart ... is not to be washed away.

Quote 1374 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1374 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1374
To speak evil of anyone, unless there is unequivocal proofs of their deserving it, is an injury for which there is no adequate reparation.

Quote 1402 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1402 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1402 There is one reward that nothing can deprive me of, and that is the consciousness of having done my duty with the strictest rectitude and most scrupulous exactness.

George Washington: to Lund Washington, May 19, 1780
The Quotable Founding Fathers



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