Charles Thomson - (1729 - 1824)

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Religion: Christian
Charles Thomson on Founding Fathers Wiki Page

Charles Thomson Biography


Of all the patriots of the Revolution, no man was better acquainted with the men and events of that struggle, than Charles Thomson, who was the permanent Secretary of the Continental Congress for more than fifteen years. He was born in Ireland in 1730, and at the age of eleven years was brought to America in company with three older brothers. Their father died from the effects of sea-sickness, when within sight of the capes of the Delaware. They landed at New Castle, in Delaware, and had no other capital with which to commence life in the New World, than strong and willing hands, and honest hearts. Charles was educated at New London, in Pennsylvania, by Dr. Allison, and became a teacher in the Friend's Academy, at New Castle. He went to Philadelphia, where he enjoyed the friendship of Dr. Franklin and other eminent men. In 1756, he was the secretary for the Delaware Indians, at a great council held with the white people, at Easton ; and that tribe adopted him as a son, according
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Charles Thomson

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Quotes by Charles Thomson

Quote 1077 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1077 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1077 I am sorry to inform you there is Reason to fear the Indian War is not quite at an End.

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, December 18, 1764

Quote 1082 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1082 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1082 When people are taxed by their own representatives, though the tax is high they pay it chearfully, from a confidence that no more than enough is required, and that a due regard is had to the ability of the giver. But when taxes are laid merely to “settle the point of independence,” and when the quantity of the tax depends on the caprice of those who have the superiority, and who will doubtless lay it heavier in order to bring down the spirits or weaken the power of those who claim independence, what encouragement is there to labour or save?

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, September 24, 1765

Quote 1085 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1085 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1085 The parliament insist on a power over all the liberties and privileges claimed by the colonies, and hence require a blind obedience and acquiescence in whatever they do: Should the behavior of the colonies happen not to square with these sovereign notions, (as I much fear it will not) what remains but by violence to compel them to obedience. Violence will beget resentment, and provoke to acts never dreamt of: But I will not anticipate evil; I pray God avert it.

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, September 24, 1765

Quote 1076 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1076 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1076 The securing a Country and fixing Boundaries is undoubtedly the grand Scheme of the Indians and to effect this they will use their utmost Endeavours, nor do I think it is possible to secure their Friendship without agreeing to this. They see themselves cooped up between two powerful Nations who are daily encreasing upon them and squeezing them into a narrower Compass; so that unless they now exert themselves they see plainly they will be quickly crushed, or deprived of their Country.

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, May 14, 1758

Quote 1083 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1083 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1083 The Sun of Liberty is indeed fast setting, if not down already, in the American colonies: But I much fear instead of the candles you mention being lighted, you will hear of the works of darkness. They are in general alarmed to the last degree.

Charles Thomson: letter to Benjamin Franklin, September 24, 1765

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