Thomas Cushing



Thomas Cushing III (March 24, 1725 – February 28, 1788) was an American lawyer, merchant, and statesman from Boston, Massachusetts. Active in Boston politics, he represented the city in the provincial assembly from 1761 to its dissolution in 1774, serving as the lower house's speaker for most of those years. Because of his role as speaker, his signature was affixed to many documents protesting British policies, leading officials in London to consider him a dangerous radical. He engaged in extended communications with Benjamin Franklin who at times lobbied on behalf of the legislature's interests in London, seeking ways to reduce the rising tensions of the American Revolution.
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Quotes about or to Thomas Cushing

Quote 139 details Share on Google+ - Quote 139 Linked In Share Button - Quote 139 Grievances cannot be redressed unless they are known; and they cannot be known but through complaints and petitions. if these are deemed affronts, and the messengers punished as offenders, who will henceforth send petitions? And who will deliver them?

Benjamin Franklin: Letter to Thomas Cushing (15 Feb. 1774)

Quote 140 details Share on Google+ - Quote 140 Linked In Share Button - Quote 140 It has been thought a dangerous thing in any stat to stop up the vent of griefs. Wise governments have therefore generally received petitions with some indulgence, even when but slightly founded.

Benjamin Franklin: Letter to Thomas Cushing (15 Feb. 1774)

Quote 141 details Share on Google+ - Quote 141 Linked In Share Button - Quote 141 Those who think themselves injured by their rulers are sometimes, by a mild and prudent answer, convinced of their error. But where complaining is a crime, hope becomes despair.

Benjamin Franklin: Letter to Thomas Cushing (15 Feb. 1774)



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