Founding Fathers - Recently Added Quotes



The following list are the latest additions to our Quotes database. The last 15 quotes added to our database are listed below.

Quote 1452 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1452 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1452 Political contests are necessary sometimes, as well as military, to afford exercise and practice, and to instruct in the art of defending liberty and property.

James Madison: to William Bradford, Jr. Jan, 214, 1774
The Quotable Founding Fathers

Quote 1451 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1451 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1451 A diffusion of knowledge is the only guardian of true liberty.


Quote 1450 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1450 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1450 and let me tell you that it is Honorable for a man to be punctual in the discharge of every public trust.

Caesar Rodney: letter to Thomas Rodney, Oct 9th 1775

Quote 1449 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1449 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1449 We shall know more of this Matter before long, till when I am Convinced the Congress will not Rise— Whether they may then or not I cannot now pretend to say—However I do know that they are heartily tired—and so am I.

Caesar Rodney: letter, July 27th, 1775 - Philadelphia

Quote 1448 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1448 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1448 That it is our fixed, determined and unalterable resolution, by all lawful ways and means in our power, to maintain, defend and preserve our before mentioned rights and liberties, and that we will transmit them entire and inviolate to our posterity; and further, that we will adopt and faithfully carry into execution all and singular such peaceable and constitutional measures as have been agreed on by this Congress.

Caesar Rodney: letter, Aug 2, 1774 to George Read

Quote 1447 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1447 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1447 That it is the indispensable duty of all the colonies not only to alleviate the unexampled distresses of our brethren of Massachusetts Bay, who are suffering in the common cause of America, but to assist them by all lawful means in removing their grievances, and for the re-establishing their constitutional right, as well as those of all America, on a solid and permanent foundation.

Caesar Rodney: letter, Aug 2, 1774 to George Read

Quote 1446 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1446 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1446 That the subjects of His Majesty in the British American Colonies have had, and of right ought to have and enjoy all the liberties, privileges and immunities of free and natural born subjects within any of His Majestys Dominions, as fully and amply as if they and every of them were born within the realm of England—that they have a property in their own estates, and are to be taxed by their own consent only, given in person or by their representatives, and are not to be assessed of their liberties and free customs, sentenced or condemned, but by lawful judgment of their peers.

Caesar Rodney: letter, Aug 2, 1774 to George Read

Quote 1445 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1445 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1445 But when you consider that e are petitioning and dressing the august body the great legislative of the empire for redress and grievances; that in order to point out those grievances it was likewise necessary to set forth the Liberty we have, and out to Enjoy, (as free born Englishmen) according to the British Constitution.


Quote 1444 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1444 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1444 ... [Independence] is determined by the Thirteen United Colonies, without one dissenting Colony. We have now Got through with the Whole of the declaration, and... you will soon have the pleasure of seeing it.


Quote 1443 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1443 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1443 The Colonists have been branded with the odious names of traitors and rebels only for complaining of their grievances.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists - Nov 20, 1772

Quote 1442 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1442 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1442 First, The first fundamental, positive law of all common wealths or states is the establishing the legislative power. As the first fundamental natural law, also, which is to govern even the legislative power itself, is the preservation of the society.

Secondly, The Legislative has no right to absolute, arbitrary power over the lives and fortunes of the people; nor can mortals assume a prerogative not only too high for men, but for angels, and therefore reserved for the exercise of the Deity alone.

...

Thirdly, The supreme power cannot justly take from any man any part of his property, without his consent in person or by his representative.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists - Nov 20, 1772

Quote 1441 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1441 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1441 The absolute rights of Englishmen and all freemen, in or out of civil society, are principally personal security, personal liberty, and private property.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists - Nov 20, 1772

Quote 1440 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1440 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1440 The natural liberty of man, by entering into society, is abridged or restrained, so far only as is necessary for the great end of society, the best good of the whole.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists - Nov 20, 1772

Quote 1439 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1439 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1439 All positive and civil laws should conform, as far as possible, to the law of natural reason and equity.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists - Nov 20, 1772

Quote 1438 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1438 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1438 Every natural right not expressly given up, or, from the nature of a social compact, necessarily ceded, remains.

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists - Nov 20, 1772
Web Source: https://history.hanover.edu/texts/adamss.html