Founding Fathers - Top 25 Quotes



Top 5 Quotes for 2014

As people interact with our site, they at times will go to a quote detail page. From that page, they have the ability to share the quote on social media, or get a link for that quote. When that page is accessed, the quote gets a Vote. Below are the top 25 quotes that have the most votes (viewed the most).

Quote 822 details Share on Google+ - Quote 822 Linked In Share Button - Quote 822
It is Favorable to liberty. Freedom can exist only in the society of knowledge. Without learning, men are incapable of knowing their rights, and where learning is confined to a few people, liberty can be neither equal nor universal.

Benjamin Rush: Essay, 1786

Quote 1323 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1323 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1323
I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as cause for withdrawing from a friend.

Thomas Jefferson: to William Hamilton, April 22, 1800
Web Source: http://www.loc.gov/resource/mtj1.022_0228_0229/

Quote 1327 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1327 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1327
A fondness for power is implanted, in most men, and it is natural to abuse it, when acquired.


Quote 36 details Share on Google+ - Quote 36 Linked In Share Button - Quote 36
I am for doing good to the poor, but I differ in opinion of the means. I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. In my youth I traveled much, and I observed in different countries, that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.

Benjamin Franklin: On the Price of Corn and Management of the Poor, November 1766

Quote 1326 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1326 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1326
It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among our opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political & social opposition, who transferred at once to the person the hatred they bore to his political opinions.

Thomas Jefferson: to Richard Mentor Johnson, 10 March 1808

Quote 1328 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1328 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1328
Histories of Lives are seldom entertaining, unless they contain something either admirable or exemplar.

Quote 1325 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1325 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1325
I became of course the butt of every thing which reason, ridicule, malice and falsehood could supply. they have concentrated all their hatred on me till they have really persuaded themselves that I am the sole source of all their imaginary evils.

Thomas Jefferson: to Richard Mentor Johnson, 10 March 1808

Quote 1322 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1322 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1322
[G]iving a distinct and independent power to do any act they please which may be good for the Union, would render all the preceding and subsequent enumerations of power completely useless.


Quote 1318 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1318 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1318
Those that feel can best judge.

Quote 1320 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1320 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1320 Q. On what do you found your opinion, that the people in America made any such distinction?

-- I know that whenever the subject has occurred in conversation where I have been present, it has appeared to be the opinion of every one, that we could not be taxed in a parliament where we were not represented. But the payment of duties laid by act of parliament, as regulations of commerce, was never disputed.

Benjamin Franklin: Examination of Dr. Benjamin Franklin in the House of Commons - 1766

Quote 1319 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1319 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1319 Q. What do you think is the reason that the people of America increase faster than in England?

-- Because they marry younger, and more generally.

Benjamin Franklin: Examination of Dr. Benjamin Franklin in the House of Commons - 1766

Quote 1321 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1321 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1321 I think the difference is very great. An external tax is a duty laid on commodities imported; that duty is added to the first cost, and other charges on the commodity, and when it is offered to sale, makes a part of the price. If the people do not like it at that price, they refuse it; they are not obliged to pay it. But an internal tax is forced from the people without their consent, if not laid by their own representatives. The Stamp Act says, we shall have no commerce, make no exchange of property with each other, neither purchase nor grant, nor recover debts; we shall neither marry nor make our wills, unless we pay such sums, and thus it is intended to extort our money from us, or ruin us by the consequences of refusing to pay for it.

Benjamin Franklin: Examination of Dr. Benjamin Franklin in the House of Commons - 1766

Quote 1324 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1324 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1324 I suppose indeed that in public life a man whose political principles have any decided character, and who has energy enough to give them effect, must always expect to encounter political hostility from those of adverse principles. But I came to the government under circumstances calculated to generate peculiar acrimony.

Thomas Jefferson: to Richard Mentor Johnson, 10 March 1808
Web Source: http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-7586

Quote 667 details Share on Google+ - Quote 667 Linked In Share Button - Quote 667 Posterity, you will never know how much it cost the present generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you will make good use of it. If you do not, I shall repent in heaven that ever I took half the pains to preserve it.

John Adams: Unknown

Quote 1329 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1329 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1329
The ground of liberty is to be gained by inches, that we must be contented to secure what we can get from time to time, and eternally press forward for what is yet to get.

Thomas Jefferson: to Charles Clay Monticello Jan. 27. 1790.
Web Source: http://tjrs.monticello.org/letter/123

Quote 674 details Share on Google+ - Quote 674 Linked In Share Button - Quote 674 We have staked the whole future of our new nation, not upon the power of government; far from it. We have staked the future of all our political constitutions upon the capacity of each of ourselves to govern ourselves according to the moral principles of the Ten Commandments of God.

James Madison: 1778 to the General Assembly of the State of Virginia
For God and Country (T.K. Marion)

Quote 1330 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1330 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1330
It takes time to persuade men to do even what is for their own good.

Thomas Jefferson: to Charles Clay Monticello Jan. 27. 1790.

Quote 1199 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1199 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1199
To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead.

Thomas Paine: The Crisis No. V - The American Crisis (1776 - 1783)
Web Source: http://izquotes.com/quote/285410
Quoted Document: The Crisis

Quote 70 details Share on Google+ - Quote 70 Linked In Share Button - Quote 70
Government is instituted for the common good; for the protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness of the people; and not for profit, honor, or private interest of any one man, family, or class of men; therefore, the people alone have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to institute government; and to reform, alter, or totally change the same, when their protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness require it.

John Adams: Thoughts on Government, 1776

Quote 1331 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1331 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1331 The Bible is the best of all books, for it is the word of God and teaches us the way to be happy in this world and in the next. Continue therefore to read it and to regulate your life by its precepts.

John Jay: 1784

Quote 1317 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1317 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1317 To instruct, to advise, to qualify those, who have been restored to freedom, for the exercise and enjoyment of civil liberty, to promote in them habits of industry, to furnish them with employments suited to their age, sex, talents, and other circumstances, and to procure their children an education calculated for their future situation in life; these are the great outlines of the annexed plan, which we have adopted, and which we conceive will essentially promote the public good, and the happiness of these our hitherto too much neglected fellow-creatures.

Benjamin Franklin: Address to the public - 1789
Quoted Document: An Address to the Public (Concerning Slavery)

Quote 174 details Share on Google+ - Quote 174 Linked In Share Button - Quote 174 Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God

Benjamin Franklin: Pennsylvania Evening Post (14 Dec. 1775)
For God and Country (T.K. Marion)

Quote 1332 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1332 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1332 However [political parties] may now and then answer popular ends, they are likely in the course of time and things, to become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people and to usurp for themselves the reins of government, destroying afterwards the very engines which have lifted them to unjust dominion....The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism.

George Washington: Farewell Address, Sep. 17, 1796

Quote 172 details Share on Google+ - Quote 172 Linked In Share Button - Quote 172 If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or your arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen.

Samuel Adams: Unknown

Quote 1316 details Share on Google+ - Quote 1316 Linked In Share Button - Quote 1316 Attention to emancipated black people, it is therefore to be hoped, will become a branch of our national police; but, as far as we contribute to promote this emancipation, so far that attention is evidently a serious duty incumbent on us, and which we mean to discharge to the best of our judgment and abilities.

Benjamin Franklin: Address to the public - 1789
Quoted Document: An Address to the Public (Concerning Slavery)